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  5. "Noi facciamo una torta."

"Noi facciamo una torta."

Translation:We make a cake.

January 10, 2013

69 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nictheman

Why is "we make out with a cake" not correct? We do that sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duomail

Sorry, what exactly would "we make out with a cake" be? That is, in other words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

Teenagers 'make out with' each other in the back seat of a parked car (necking, etc.) . You don't 'make out with' a cake (or have I just led too sheltered a life to have encountered this behaviour?) :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rakalaw18

It's all the rage now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cedrean

Three times a week is average


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolomontecillo

Jim Levenstein did it with a pie :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Girishkorgaonkar

I was just about to say that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/armageddonout

Licking the frosting violently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kr2002

Because you can't make out with a cake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielRPrada

Not with that attitude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChumiPepper

As odd as it might seem, there is an expression, "Make/made out with (a) the __" It means you have left with or been given something good, surprising, unexpected or at a good price.

"I am going to hit the bakery right before closing and make out with a cake."
"I totally made out with the tires. They were on sale." "My parents bought me a car for graduation. I really made out."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amgoad

I've heard "make out like a bandit" a lot when referring to good deals or situations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChumiPepper

Yes, good example!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

Maybe it's regional. I've never heard it used in that context, especially when followed by a particular noun. In fact, your first 2 examples about the bakery and the tires still made me grin (yes, I am that immature). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoogDiHoogland

What region? Upstate new york. Well I'm from Utica and I've never heard the phrase "made out". Oh not in Utica no, it's an albany expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

No doubt ... I totally made out on that deal!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

With regards to the first comment, I guess it is because prepare is a different verb in Italian, although it does mean the same thing. For the second comment, I have only ever heard the phrase 'to make out with' in the sense of 'necking', i.e. kissing,hugging, etc., and have certainly never heard it used when referring to baked goods! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjlagrande

Must be a pretty delicious cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marshame

Please! You just made my wine come out of my nose!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jestophre

I love that you're drinking wine during your ”lesson”. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke766746

As a university student studying Italian for my degree i love using duolingo to keep my mind active but one thing that bothers me is the constant use of "noi" "voi" etc when in real life theyre never used due to context and extreme obviousness


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wildflamer17

that awkward moment when you confuse cake with turtle XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twisted_fool

In the 3 options, one was "we eat a cake", which was marked incorrectly, but in a previous question "faccio colazione" meant I eat breakfast. Does the above sentence ever translate as "we eat a cake"? How would one know when the verb fare could mean eat and when it couldn't?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

That's a good question. Maybe you only use fare in the context of eating when speaking of a particular meal (colazione, pranzo, cena), but it means 'making' for individual dishes that require preparation. Just a guess. Any more fluent speakers of Italian out there care to weigh in? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

Fare is not quite synonymous with eat :) There are certain phrases you'll pick up such as fare colazione but think of that more as an occasion or an event. I'm having breakfast is similar: you can eat your granola bar on the train, but you would almost be joking if you called that having breakfast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MMCK84

I tried "We bake a cake" - which was correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjojoe

In english an norwegian you can say both make and/or bake a cake, both words express the same meaning but with the small detail that (in norwegian) when you bake, it means that the cake is baked at least partialy in the owen. Some cakes are not "fried" in the owen f.ex. a cheesecake and the is not baked, but "only" made.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C00L10

Fare also means "to do" so I guess that if you're referring to breakfast, I think you can say that. Mangio would make sense too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ldalessio49

Does this literally only translate to "we make a cake", or is "we are making a cake" also a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

They would both work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I think there is another tense for:"we are making a cake."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

No, duolingo accepts both English forms in every sentence I've tried. I suspect that, as in French, the present indicative means both "we make" and "we are making", depending on the context. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Man, that's really good to hear. That was not the case when I started four months ago, but I continuously reported it where there was a sentence that did not take both forms, and I have not needed to report it for a while. So it seems much better now, thanks duo ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Ok, thank you. I didn't know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steinor

can it also be "we eat a cake", like "faccio colazione", is "i eat breakfast?" ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephineS11

noi facciamo isn't it we do from the verb fare?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

The verb fare can translate to lots of different things in English depending on context. Most commonly it will translate to make or do but there are plently of other uses as well. See www.thoughtco.com/italian-verb-fare-2011684


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris323324

Thank you for that link, most helpful. Grazie!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Em.elie

In Puerto Rico, there is a pizza place called Faccio, and everyone calls their pizza Faccio pizza. Technically everyone is making pizza lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ianFisher10

The verb for "make" is rendere. It should read "Noi rendiamo una torta"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noam330126

Good....

I dont really care ☻


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novik

Hey, Why "we prepare a cake" is not an option?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imblah

that would "prepariamo una torta"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Eressea

But how is "to make a cake" not "to prepare a cake"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filiwian

Can we omit noi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChumiPepper

Sure! There are a few cases where the subject pronoun has to be used, but in most cases it is optional. Here is a site you can check out. http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare164a.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alliebear21

I clicked the word "facciamo" and the bottom translation was "get stoned with." Didn't think that was correct here, but, hey, nothing's impossible!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rossemilie

Yah, we should report that. That was disappointing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cangurina777

I am confused, I believed "Noi facciamo" definition was "We do", and so, does this mean both, We make and We do,, sheeshka. :((


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamanthaCruz4

I accidentally wrote "bake" instead of "cake." FML XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjojoe

Do the italians have a special word for "bake"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlendonStreetman

No, you can never make just 1 cake, how dare you. >:(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SzaboAT13

Omg! why isn't correct We are making?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moonwalkfan

the most normal sentence I've ever seen so far...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerardodel256119

How would I say I make a cake or she/he makes a cake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greeneyed_lady

it just confuses me a bit that "fare" can mean do and make..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peterjweiss

There are several languages where the same verb can mean "do" and "make". In French, faire; in German machen; in Hebrew la'asot. If the idea is new and therefore troublesome to you, you'll just have to use it enough to become used to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jado1234

I wonder why it's make and not bake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarunasP

Why are all new words not translated in here? How am I supposed to know them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ltrYfYXM

i misspelt facciamo otherwise it was correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliHefny2

What are the conjugations of this verb ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rorke175

I had no idea what facciamo meant. I just figured fac > factory > make. Got it right :) Anyone know the Latin for to make? I'm too lazy and tired to look it up for myself right now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NJMarinaro

March 27, 2019. Facciamo or Rendiamo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SylviaArle1

In correct English you would say " we bake a cake "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monique678830

We bake a cake, should be the write answer but Duo uses " make" <••>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianWilso343250

Why is it we make a cake instead of we can make a cake

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