"Одевшись, она пошла в ресторан."

Translation:Having gotten dressed, she went out to the restaurant.

December 8, 2015

35 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

I would say, "Having gotten dressed.." but maybe that's an Americanism? How would other native English speakers feel say this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mightypotatoe

"Having dressed.." is what first came to my mind. "Having gotten dressed..." sounds a bit wordy but I think it's also correct. I think gotten is used in North American English and got is more common everywhere else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Could be. Having dressed sounds good too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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Got vs. gotten is certainly one of the UK vs. US usage differences. Which always makes me wonder why "I've got something" is accepted in the US (not that I mind - I am generally on the UK side of the "continental divide").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

No doubt, no doubt. We do say got a lot over here. Got milk? I get it, I get it! Get it? Got it? Good! Gotta go! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3
  • Got milk? -> У тебя/вас есть молоко?
  • I get it -> я понимаю/понял (I assume this is the meaning Alf42 had in mind)
  • Got it? -> понятно? or "Do you have it?" or "Do you have a secure grip on that?" etc
  • Gotta go! -> Мне надо/пора идти (not necessarily only for "I")

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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The question is not about Past Simple (which is "got" on both sides of the pond), but about the Perfect tense - that's where the two banks of the pond seem to differ. Your examples are not quite it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexmalaho

Lol. Я понял так: Взял молока? Давай бери. Бери пока есть. Ты понял о чем я? Взял. Всё, надо надо бежать.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

You wrote, "The question is not about Past Simple (which is "got" on both sides of the pond), but about the Perfect tense - that's where the two banks of the pond seem to differ. Your examples are not quite it."

Sorry, I was trying to be cute, going off on a tangent on the general preponderance of 'got' in American parlance. I wasn't trying to give additional examples of how gotten is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

Abd it was very helpful to properly translate them. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

B/c in Britain as well there used to be two conjugation patterns depending on meaning: get-got-gotten and get-got-got (it's a fun parlor game to find a Briton raving about "gotten" being some sort of depredation wrought upon his native tongue by uncouth Americans and show the multiple uses this word enjoys in Shakespeare :) The distinctions in the perfect eroded in British English but remain in American.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jed916492

Native-born American English speaker here. Yes, Americans may use gotten, but I would leave it out and just say "having dressed." On the other hand, I would say either "I dressed" or "I got dressed."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Buratino4

'Having got dressed' sounds odd to an English-speaker because it's stylistically dissonant. Using a perfect participle 'having ....' is typical of more formal contexts, whereas 'get dressed' is stylistically on the conversational side of neutral. That's why although we'd be more likely to say 'get dressed' than 'dressed,' we'd also be more likely to say 'having dressed' than 'having got dressed.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachel270

"Having gotten dressed" needs to be added to the correct answers. It's the American variant. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alepue

"Having gotten dressed" is a proper English. It is just a mistake in "correct" answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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It's not a mistake, it's certainly correct outside of the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alepue

Meaning? English-speaking countries or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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That depends on whether you consider the UK, Ireland, Australia, South Africa etc. English-speaking.
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/get
verb (gets, getting; past got /ɡɒt/; past participle got, North American or archaic gotten /ˈɡɒt(ə)n/)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atropos2015

There is "out" here but on https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/20997796 there is no "out". Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-aks-

cause "go out" is not a common occurrence... if you work at a restaurant you would just "go", but if you plan on eating there you would "go out ". I guess you can go out to school for a prom dance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ken138609

OUT is not necessary. One has to assume the restaurant is "out."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tarakan23.

Does anyone else hear the male speaker say "Анна" (with the first syllable stressed), rather than "она" (with stress on the second syllable)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N0thingness_

In this particular sentence I also hear the female voice say "Анна" instead of "она".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jed916492

My Russian-speaking girlfriend is very displeased by frequent errors in where some words are stressed. In this exercise, одевшись is stressed on the O, but she says it should be stressed on the Е. If I do a lesson without a headset, she frequently interrupts it to correct the pronunciation. Very distressing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessandroVerc

Why "Having got dressed, she went out to THE restaurant." but "Having undressed she went to bed (without THE)" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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Because "going to bed" does not imply any particular bed - it's a common expression indicating that she is reclining herself somewhere for the purpose of sleep. In the same way, you would not use "the" (or "a") in expressions like "to go to school", "to go to church", "to go to college" and (at least outside of the US) "to go to hospital". You can use "the" in these expression if you are talking about a particular building or establishment, but not otherwise. Why "to go to restaurant" is not on that list - I cannot tell you. Perhaps it was not such a common concept throughout the ages when these expressions got formed. So with "restaurant" you would have to use an article - not necessarily "the", she could be going to a restaurant (if the destination is unspecified or has not been decided upon).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlessandroVerc

Thank you for your explain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

I got a headache from all of this. I think we got 'er did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ksanalo

Why here used "out"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-aks-

imho it's a set expression " to go out" kind of like our " выйти в свет "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann55075

ОдЕвшись. The male voice is wrong as always :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetGidle

Ok, looked in 501 Russian Verbs book. Found at the end of conjugations I have ever heard of. DEVERBALS Past act. Одевавший (ся) Good example of why Duo doesn't teach grammar forms in Russian. It's a nice intro to hearing it exists, but I would not be ready to get too heavy into this grammar yet. So it's something she did in the past in the reflexive adverbial form? Ok, then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffCat6

Но она Анна. (One day i will hear the difference. Or meet Anna. lol)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y3Ct6

Getting dressed she went out to the restaurant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlleyH2

WROTE 'dressed ,she went to the restaurant ' and got it wrong, how?

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