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"У вас в квартире есть балкон?"

Translation:Does your apartment have a balcony?

December 8, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaStyIes

Marked wrong for "Do you have a balcony in the apartment?" (with "the" highlighted as the error, and "Do you have a balcony in your apartment" given as a correct answer).

Possession is as clearly implied in the English as in the Russian; it'd be rare to find someone who has a balcony pertaining to someone else's apartment.

Reported.

In case it's not already added, "at" should obviously be available as preposition too, though I erred on the side of the literal "in", myself.

Edit: Now tried that, and was marked wrong for "Do you have a balcony at your apartment?", with the preposition marked as incorrect.

Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kosmozhuk

Strictly speaking I can live in an apartment, which is not mine. Still having my own apartment elsewhere. So, the first apartment would be "the apartment" but not "my apartment". In Russia (not in Russian per se!) that may be quite a distinction.

But for the purposes of this test I think you're right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PorkBellyRoast

Would it be right to say "Is there a balcony in your flat?". It is marked as wrong. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stanmann

"Is there a balcony in your apartment" was also marked wrong. I think we are both right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kpagcha

Literally it's "do you have a balcon in (your) apartment?", right? Else, I would be confused about the usage of есть because a previous centence says В нашем городе дешёвый интернет but there's no есть.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonapard

В нашем городе есть дешёвый интернет!!(I found it) В нашем городе есть дешёвый интернет?? When I talk about a well-known fact I say в нашем городе дешевый интернет.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lindo194154

although it seems pointless to make these comments, it remains frustrating to have correct answers continually marked wrong. "Is there a balcony in you apartment" is a perfectly accceptable translation... (just one example, several per exercise)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoddyEvans

Why is "at your apartment" marked incorrect. That is perfectly ok english. In fact i would very rarely say "in your apartment"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/palmik235

'Do you've a balcony...' is wrong English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndroidKanada

Still marked "the apartment" wrong, two years later. I thought implied possession (no pronoun needed) only held for body parts and family members. Shouldn't this be свой балкон to be "your apartment"?

(Edit: I seem to remember the construction "у pronoun в place" and am trying to find the notes...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rumpelstil12

what is the purpose of the в in у вас в квартире есть балкон ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

to specify that the balcony is part of the apartment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

In American English, when an apartment has a balcony, that means that the balcony forms part of the exterior of the apartment walls. You walk through a door from the interior of the apartment onto the balcony. That idea can be expressed as Duo suggests, "Does your apartment have a balcony?" or it can be expressed as "Is there a balcony on your apartment?"

If you ask, "Is there a balcony in your apartment?" that question asks whether there's a balcony inside the apartment - something which is possible in a two-level apartment.

If you ask, "Is there a balcony at your apartment?", this questions asks whether there is a balcony anywhere on the outside of the entire apartment complex - it's not limited to just a single (your own) apartment. As a result, it's not a question that normally would be asked.

The most likely question is thus "Is there a balcony on your apartment/Does your apartment have a balcony?" Either of those is natural and normal.

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