"Добрый день, Тим."

Translation:Good afternoon, Tim.

3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Elly_K
Elly_K
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Afternoon ≠ день

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    And добрый ≠ good (because «добрый» usually means 'kind' and not 'good'). However, in the context of this sentence this works as a translation. :)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/constantin60

    I haven't been taught that Добрый день means 'good afternoon'. I thought that it means 'Good day' and can be used in the morning, as well, but not in the early morning where 'До́брое у́тро' would be used instead.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Spirus123
    Spirus123
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    It is namely Good day,but in english that has no usage,so it is usually translated as Good afternoon.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HerrArbo
    HerrArbo
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    People do say "good day" in English.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
    zirkul
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    "Good day" is used in California, but largely as a parting remark, not as a greeting. (I guess it's a shortened version of "Have a good day".) "Добрый день", on the other hand, is definitely a greeting.

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Marcelo.Barbosa

    Good day is used in Australia

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Mikkel959063

    Isn't that more like "G'day mate"?

    2 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nbaussiekid

    I wanted to see if Duo took «G'day Tim». He didn't.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mr.ignacio

    пока! I am having trouble understanding the difference between доброе and добрый.

    Can anyone explain? Thanks!

    2 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Russian nouns have one of three genders assigned to them: masculine, feminine and neuter. Ве́чер 'evening' is masculine, у́тро is neuter. Most feminine nouns end in -а, -я or -ь; most masculine nouns end in a consonant or -ь (sometimes in -а or -я); most neuter nouns end in -о or -е.

      The adjectives should have the same gender as the noun: до́брый should be used with masculine nouns, до́брая — with feminine, до́брое — with neuter.

      Since unstressed vowels are reduced in pronunciation, both до́брая and до́брое are pronounced in the same way, /'dobrəjɪ/. But the difference exists in writing. To understand which one you should use, look at the noun. If it's feminine, you use до́брая. If it's neuter, you use до́брое.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/mr.ignacio

      thanks for taking the time to respond in such a clear fashion!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Dana.Bashkour

      день = Day Добрый день = Have a good day

      3 years ago

      [deactivated user]

        In English, I would use "Have a good day" as a farewell phrase. But in Russian, «Добрый день» is a greeting, and «Хорошего дня» is a farewell phrase.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/PetrReoSkp
        PetrReoSkp
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        Why not: Hello, Tim ?

        Is the wishing of a good day not a form of general greeting?

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/intrader
        intrader
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        Why "good" in good evening and good night use a different word? Добрый & спакоуп or something like that

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Amatziakutub

        In the Lonely Planet Russian phrasebook from March 2006 on page 111 Добрый день is shown to mean good morning/day, exactly like that with the "/" between morning & day. I think it's like good morning in spanish, buenos días which literally means good days, but is understood like good morning is understood in English.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Cesar_Benites

        Por lo que entiendo equivale al "Buenos días" o "¡Buen día!" en español y no a "Buenas tardes"

        9 months ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
        Danmoller
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        How would one say the standard good morning?

        2 years ago

        [deactivated user]

          «До́брое у́тро».

          2 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/LancadorDeLaser

          How do you pronounce the Russian letter "ы"? And how is "ый" pronounced in "добрый"?

          2 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/Reena_March

          It sounds to me as iy like dobriy.

          2 years ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/Roihu7
          Roihu7
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          So can день be both "day" and "afternoon"? It says it means day but apparently добрый день means good afternoon.

          2 years ago

          [deactivated user]

            Yes.

            It can refer either to

            • the part of the 24-hour period when the sun shines (in fact, «све́тлое вре́мя су́ток» 'bright time of the 24-hour period' is a cliché phrase in Russian, used instead of «день» sometimes), or to
            • the time between after «утро» 'morning' and before «ве́чер» 'evening' (='afternoon'), or
            • sometimes it can be used instead of «су́тки» to refer to '24-hour period', especially in colloquial speech where «су́тки» sounds too formal.
            2 years ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/Jebercito1
            Jebercito1
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            Can someone explain me the use of the letters "ь" and "ъ" please ???

            1 year ago

            [deactivated user]

              Most Russian consonants have two variants: soft and hard. So, н has two variants: hard н and soft нь. This is similar to Portuguese n and nh, but this difference exists for most consonants in Russian, not just for n/nh and l/lh.

              Before vowels, the vowel sign marks the softness of the previous consonants (а, э, о, ы, у is used after hard consonants: на is hard н + а; я, е, ё, и, ю are used after soft consonants: ня is soft n + a). In other cases, softness is marked by soft sign (нь = soft н). Hardness is unmarked, it is assumed by default (this was different before 1917: back then, Тим would have been written Тимъ).

              To make things more complicated, я, е, ё, ю have double meaning. After consontant, they show softness of consonant and mark a vowel sound. But after vowels, at the beginning of the word, and after ь and ъ, they mark Y sound + vowel sound. I.e. я = йа, е = йэ, ё = йо, ю = йу. This is the only case when ъ is used in modern Russian: in подъезд, it shows the pronunciation под-йэзд (with hard д, Y sound, and then e).

              You can search forum discussions for soft consonants, they cause difficulties for many learners so there should be many questions related to them.

              1 year ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/Jebercito1
              Jebercito1
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              Obrigado pela explicação.

              1 year ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/chucknorri995730

              are you supposed to say it in russian or english?

              7 months ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/-kit-kat-

              Добрый день. Afternoon-после полудня! (Lunch)

              1 month ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/AlPolyglot
              AlPolyglot
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              This is what happened to Tim Doner in the film shop. Watch the video ''Teen speaks 20 languages'' on youtube at 1:15

              2 years ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/nyanacat16

              so, is it pronounced as "doh-bre dim"?

              1 year ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/DuanDini

              Hello its the same

              1 year ago

              https://www.duolingo.com/idagagliuf

              W

              1 year ago
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