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  5. "He wants a cup of tea."

"He wants a cup of tea."

Translation:Он хочет чашку чая.

December 9, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeVinDuRosier

чашку accusative чая genitive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jennypebel

чая genetive/partative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.alrashed

Why is it чашку and not чашка ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackVUL

Хочет puts the rest of the sentence in the accusative case, including чашка and чай, which transform into чашку and чая.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelleNauta

Isn't чая the genitive case? (masculine singular)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackVUL

My bad, you're right. Чашку is still in the accusative case, but чая would be the genitive. The best explanation I can give is that in a way, the tea belongs to the cup. This would put чай in genitive, not accusative, while чашка remains in accusative because it's the object being acted upon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tedoy1

To further add to this explanation because the tea is "of" something it becomes genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malchikrene

Does он хочет стакан чая also work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanisaChatte

"Стакан" is "glass"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matt.LeCroix

Another sentence discussion argued rather convincingly that tea in Russia is served in a 'glass' (стакан чая).

If I go to Russia, which should I ask for? Стакан чая? Or чашку чая?

Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rowdy_Wolf

I used стакан too. Previous exercises left me to believe the words were interchangeable, we are wrong! Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WayneWestl1

It told me to use чашечку instead of чашку. Me confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnP331

Why not Ему хочется чашка чая?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Me_Metida

You should use the form "чашку" anyways. But yes, "Ему хочется чашку чая" should work, imho.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EfremSkopje

So, this sentence means the same thing? Can you explain how that grammar works? It looks like it's in reflexive but I'm not sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomaszabel

Generally I see it as:

Он хочет - he wants Ему хочется - he feels like

An example is "Мне хочется курить, но не хочу." - would translate as "I feel like having a smoke but I don't want to." Even though I'd love a cigarette, I know i shouldn't now.

There could be gray areas where either is okay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirGlick

when is it хочет and when хочешь?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian53542

'хочет' is the third person singular form. (He/she/it) 'хочешь' is the second person singular form. (You)

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