"С Новым годом, друзья!"

Translation:Happy New Year, friends!

December 10, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasFisc4

"Happy New Year's, friends!" should be accepted as well.

December 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipMonk

I agree. In my circles (in Arizona, USA), "Happy New Year's" is significantly more common than "Happy New Year".

February 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jtaylor162

Ditto for Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington DC, Chicago, greater New York City, Philadelphia and a few other backwaters...

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GT_Shark

for some reason its just hitting me now how strong the "новOM" sound is in the word "новЫМ". People talk about how phonetic the Russian language is. Guess no language is really altogether phonetic...

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel8875

German is pretty close to being purely phonetic. The only thing i could think of in German not being spoken as written is the "silent H". For example the word "Rahmen" (Frame).

The German language goes through many reforms all the time to keep it as phoentic as possible and to keep the language up to date.

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Anirine

In German the biggest problem when it comes to being phonetic is the varying pronunciation of vocals in combination with single / multiple consonants. Rule: before double consonants is a short vocal (Damm) ; before a single consonant is a long vocal (Schaf) But you have so incredibly many exceptions

January 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung

It's a rather distinct sound, given enough time and training you'll probably hear the difference.

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel8875

Why do we use новым and not новый in this special case?

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung

It's because Russians don't say or write the full phrase in everyday speech (or on many greeting cards). The verb they omit is поздравить (to congratulate). It is a transitive verb - the person/people you're congratulating take accusative case, and the event/occasion you're congratulating them on takes the preposition С + instrumental.

A full sentence would look like:

Я поздравляю вас с Новым годом.

But in informal situations, like with friends, family, classmates or coworkers you oftentimes will just hear С Новым годом!!

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel8875

Thank you very much!

May 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/russianmasterx

Where is the "happy" in this sentence?

It should translate to just "New year, friends !".

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung

The full phrase is Поздравляю тебя с Новым годом (or any variation of that, if it's multiple people talking to multiple people then Поздравляем вас с Новым годом for instance). It would basically translate as "Congratulations on the New Year", but of course in English we don't congratulate people with holidays but rather wish them happy or merry holidays, which is how the translation comes out here. Because Поздравлять кого-то is a rather lengthy expression, they just chop it down to с праздником. "New Year, friends!" would be Новый год, друзья or Это Новый год, друзья.

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom882774

That was really helpful. I have heard the с used in happy birthday as well and always wondered how it was getting translated to 'happy'

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939

HOW DO YOU WRITE DRUZIA IN LATIN TRANSLITERATION ? i cannot finish this lesson because everything i write is rejected by DUO!! i wrote DRUZIA = rejected / DRUSIA = rejected DRUZiya = rejected - i read the lessons in cyrilic but I don't have the cyrilic keyboard ! I don' see where my mistake is. Thanks.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung

Druz'ya should be accepted. "Druziya" would be "Друзия"; "Druzia" = "Друзиа"; "Drusia" = "Друсиа".

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LindsayGer

" Happy new year my friends "

Should work.

December 28, 2017
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