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https://www.duolingo.com/LiaLeonetta

Irish students, does Duolingo help with your Irish at school?

LiaLeonetta
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I've been wondering about this lately, for students in Ireland who use Duolingo to learn Irish, do you find that it's helpful with schoolwork? As I've only just started to make meaningful progress on the tree, I can't really tell how helpful it is yet, but I'm curious to see whether people find it helps to raise their grades or not :) Go raibh maith agaibh!

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

School would probably be a better supplement to the Duolingo Irish course than the other way round.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafydd88
dafydd88
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If only that were true. Irish in schools has failed generation after generation. Just like 'Welsh Second Language' in Wales. It's time our governments started treating our languages properly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

I agree with you, but I feel some may have not fully understood my comment.

A supplement is something you add to something else in order to enhance it. So when I say 'School would probably be a better supplement to the Duolingo Irish course than the other way round', that means learning Irish at school would be better for enhancing your main Duolingo studies as opposed to Duolingo used for enhancing your main school studies.

My original comment in short: Duolingo Irish is better than school Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EztizenS
EztizenS
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Second languages at school tend to fail, specially if mandatory, because you don't learn a language that you don't want to learn just by doing some exercises a couple of hours a week. That's why, even though English is mandatory is so many countries, most people in those countries can't use it at all. If they wanted people to really know the language, they need immersion schools, where the language is not just a subject, but the language of instruction. That makes people native speakers, not just parrots who learn a couple of words and just leave it at that. But for that, firstly the government has to offer it (schools, teachers, books) and then society has to accept it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafydd88
dafydd88
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That's what we are trying to achieve in Wales. We believe every child has a right to a Welsh medium education and the only way to do it is immersion for all not the select few. Only 20% of our schools are currently Welsh immersion. Obviously we can't just make all schools Welsh medium over night as that would mean many great teachers out of a job. The current teachers will be placed on voluntary sabbaticals were they will spend 6 months studying the language intensively every day and how to teach through that language. Those with no Welsh language skills will have a year off with full pay. No current teacher will lose their job if they don't learn the language or teach through it but they will be given incentives to do so. Then to invest in the future all future trainee teachers must speak Welsh before commencing teacher training. Those with little or no Welsh will be entitled to the same 6 month or 12 month intensive training as current teachers before commencing their teacher training. It can be done and within a year all primary schools must have a minimum of 30% teaching time through the medium of Welsh. This will increase every couple of years. In secondary schools the same will be done starting with certain subjects. The two subjects that have been singled out for the pilot year are ICT and PE. Welsh medium education for all will soon be a reality. Bilingualism is now a right for all children in Wales regardless of background.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatConn
MatConn
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I like most of what is said above. However my experience learning Irish has been that ALL of my Irish teachers were fluent in Irish. They just were not able to get any enthusiasm for the language into their students. In a related note, I've always felt that if you enjoy a subject, the better you get at it, and the easier it is to study. Conversely, if you get better at a subject if it is easier to learn and therefore to study. My conclusion is that the way Irish is taught from a very early age is key to success in learning. Whether that comes from parents who make the effort to speak Irish to their children, or the day care helpers, or first teachers, or all of the, I'm not sure. Early quality teaching:That's the key!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

@dafydd88

they'll never take it seriously unfortunately. (my opinion) Ireland has enjoyed decades of Investment from Multinationals like Medtronic, Apple and Goggle. Part of this would be to do with the low corporate tax rate but also because Ireland is a mainly English Speaking country which helps. The Government don't want to risk losing even a bit of investment by trying to revive Irish (meaning English will maybe have less importance). Of course they will try and make it seem like they are doing their best to revive the language but when experts actually put together reasonable plans on how they could go about it more efficiently they never take their opinions into account. Which i find horrible.

DISCLAIMER: This is only my opinion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafydd88
dafydd88
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That implies that the government believes any serious investment and a true revival of the language would result in a monolingual Ireland. The English language is going nowhere and the fact is bilingual societies are becoming the norm. A monolingual Anglophone Ireland is an anomaly. An Irish speaking Ireland would complement English speaking Ireland, culturally enriching it further while not effecting external investment as investors will know English will still be an integral part of Irish society. The problem is their country is led by a Dic Sion Dafydd (traitor) who has betrayed his linguistic community. But obviously the problems go beyond him and the rest of Fine Gael.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiaLeonetta
LiaLeonetta
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To be honest I think the problem is less about the government and more about the country's opinion of Irish in general. In school the majority of students dislike learning the language and don't see it as worthwhile nor useful, and adults rarely use the language at all after finishing school. Irish-speaking schools do exist and are growing, but still make up only 10% of primary schools and 3% of secondary schools. The main problem is how Irish is taught in school, with little focus on actually speaking the language, but sadly I can't see this changing anytime soon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dafydd88
dafydd88
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Schools are only half the battle. But if the language is to survive let alone thrive as a community language then you must start taking more radical action. It amazes me that their has been no radical action for Gaeilge for nearly a century. Where are the rallies? The protests? The hunger strikes? The vandalism of public property? The imprisoned martyrs? I will never understand the indifference. Irish speakers, learners and sympathisers need to learn to unite and fight for the language before it's to late. Inspire the next generation, show them the language has real value and isn't simply a school subject. Show them that it is their heritage and it is being taken from them. Show them the suffering of the community and warrior spirit the refuses to die. The youth have no respect for the language, teach them to respect it. Show them that it can be cool, show them that it is relevant to them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dquedenfeld16

I hope it's not too late. There is a lot of resentment towards Irish in the younger generations (though I speak second-hand, I am from America).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiaLeonetta
LiaLeonetta
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I interpreted your comment incorrectly too, and unfortunately there is a huge amount of resentment towards Irish in schools, with few students liking the subject unless they use it outside of school independently, and many finishing school not able to hold a conversation in the language.

2 years ago