https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah_B_16

Cherokee course update and other potential courses in 2016.

If you saw my post from about two days ago, than you know that I emailed the Cherokee Nation about using Duolingo and them applying for a course and stuff. Yesterday though, I got a comment from a user who gave me the email address, press@duolingo.com . She brought up a good point about notifying the staff about the applications, so I sent them an email about how Cherokee would be good to add to the Duolingo list of languages and how they should be on the lookout for the applications, just to make sure the applications wouldn't go unnoticed. They emailed me back today, saying, and I quote:

"We are planning an initiative next year so you should hear from us within the first few months of 2016. It'll be an opportunity to save dying languages and we'll be able to pick 5. Given our small team, that's a lot of resources we'll be allocating because we understand the importance of doing so. Cherokee will doubtlessly get a lot of attention and we'll love to involve you for support and to make the course more likely to get created. We're also in touch with the White House, and they have some stake in working with US native languages."

So, not only is Cherokee a likely option, but up to four other endangered languages are likely to be chosen. With someone like the President of the United States backing some of these languages, I am 100% sure they will get done!

December 10, 2015

156 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

Five endangered languages to look forward to! Our cup runneth over!

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irusejka

I hope Greenlandic will be included

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaGlynn

Incredible! I'm hoping that one day Duo will open an incubator for Arrernte or Kaytetye, two Indigenous language from Central Australia spoken by my family. I would love to coordinate a team of bilingual volunteers to get an endangered Australian Indigenous language up and running in the incubator! I am not sure if Duolingo would be interested in a language with only 3000 native speakers, but it has the opportunity to attract so many Australians and international learners who want to learn more about Indigenous culture. Using duolingo architecture, we could ensure the language prospers for many years to come!! Love your work duo

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pratyush.

Duo is showing so many good dreams that I can't keep track.

December 13, 2015

[deactivated user]

    This is amazing news.

    December 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jillianimal

    I hope they really mean all of this & not like that "we'll contact you!" bs whenever you apply to do something. I've been thinking about reaching out too for Lakota but I know that's not anywhere near as in demand as Cherokee. Guess it's still worth a shot to get around to doing that.

    December 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

    The normal we'll contact you stuff isn't this specific in my experience.

    December 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jillianimal

    I was thinking that too, I guess it wouldn't really make sense to give us this kind of expectation if they didn't really plan this out at all, it would look pretty bad on their part.

    I'm just worried about getting my hopes up.. crosses fingers

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman_Huczok

    Lakȟóta heníčha? I'm trying to learn but there's absolutely no decent resources, I think the Lakota language is really great and I 100% support any chance of it getting on here.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jillianimal

    There are a few apps for it but yeah it is still pretty limited. There are also a few pages on fb that regularly teach some of the dakota dialect. I think those have been some of the most extensive & thorough resources I've come across.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

    Look for a post of mine called All Language Grammar. Just posted it 1/31/2016. Hope you get this.

    February 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coolazice

    Great news. Seeing as my home country of Australia has so many of the world's endangered languages, I would love to see at least one Australian aboriginal language on Duolingo.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeteFromDarwin

    One of the at-risk Pama-Nyunga languages would be awesome. A friend learned some Arrernte and was able to have enough of a casual conversation with other Pama-Nyunga language family speakers (Mirning?) a thousand kilometers away to share useful information and get them to fall over laughing with shock and amusement.

    December 12, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coolazice

    Haha yep. Western Desert languages (like Pitjantjatjara) are also particularly helpful, as they tend to be mutually intelligible. But Arrernte and Pitjantjatjara are actually some of the relatively healthy aboriginal languages. So many others have less than 100 speakers now, which makes finding people to create a course much harder :(

    December 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

    A friend of mine is the son of one of the main linguists who first documented and researched languages around Alice Springs - if you read old grammars and stuff for Arrernte, Pitjantjatjara etc you often see Gavan Breen as one of the authors).

    Tiwi or Yolngu Matha would have materials, teachers and speakers who could potentially be part of a project.

    Wiradjuri is taught in schools in the Wagga area, has lots of teaching materials etc. Might be possible to assemble a Duolingo team.

    Also, in the area where I grew up (East Gippsland, in Victoria) the local indigenous language Ganai (also called Kurnai, or even Ganai/Kurnai for inclusiveness value) is taught in some of the schools.

    However, I'm not sure if there are any full speakers, or if the language was fully documented before the last native speaker died. But maybe something like that. I've always been interested in Boon Wurrung / Bunurong which was spoken around the area where I live now. But I'm not sure if it was full documented. There are one or two partial speakers around though.

    I might email one of my mum's colleagues who is in the Ganai/Kurnai community... See if they want to get in touch with DL and volunteer...

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oskalingo

    NSW has just recently added Aboriginal languages as an HSC subject, beginning in 2016:

    As you mention above, they were already being taught in schools across the state, this initiative is just taking it further.

    January 14, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

    Victoria beat NSW to it by a few years - Indigenous languages and reclamation has been a VCE subject since about 2012 (I think).

    January 14, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaGlynn

    I am from central Australia. People from Alice springs and the surrounding area speak Arrernte. My family speak Kaytetye, but with only 300 speakers there woudn't be enough bilingual volunteers that have the literacy rates in english to contribute. However, I would love to coordinate a team of bilingual volunteers for ARRERNTE to get it up and running in the incubator! After speaking to a number of people, I have found 15 native speakers (who are fluent in English) and a few linguists who would be keen to contribute. There are several schools that teach Arrernte in Alice springs, and people would be very excited to work towards its graduation from the incubator. I am not sure if Duolingo would be interested in a language with only 3000 native speakers, but it has the opportunity to attract so many Australians and international learners who want to learn more about Indigenous culture. Using duolingo architecture, we could ensure the language prospers for many years to come!!

    July 8, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coolazice

    Fantastic! I hope somebody from Duolingo reads this. Maybe post on Luis' wall as well?

    July 9, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaGlynn

    thanks! will do

    July 9, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xefjord

    My gosh. I love hearing stuff like this. You are amazing good sir. But will this be five Native American endangered languages? or just 5 endangered languages in General?

    December 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah_B_16

    I believe just five in general, however it is likely one if not a couple of them will be native languages.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xefjord

    Well lets start our guesses now lol. What languages do you think they will add? Cherokee and Hmong are two languages I can think of. But I don't know many others :x

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fr224

    A while back there was a news article that Duolingo was going to start a Mayan course. You can find a Mayan flag in a sprite document by pressing F12.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hojinkie

    I'm sorry, but how do you get the sprite document?

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fr224

    Press F12

    Go to Click on Resources on the top row

    Open the Frames folder

    Open the first folder under Frames

    Click on Images

    Scroll down to flag-sprite10.svg

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hluigi3

    Now the image is flag-sprite10.svg. They changed something again.

    Another form to find the image:

    Go to the homepage and click with the right button of the mouse on the flag next to the words "(language) skills - level (number)"

    Click on Inspect

    Then look for some external link in blue (if you are using Chrome or Opera) or red (if you are using Firefox) and click. Will appear an image with the flags of each language and your respectives leveling up flags.

    The Mayan is between the egg flag and the Norwegian flag, but considering that this flag appears before the flags of languages that already are hatching or already are stable, such as Catalan, Welsh, Swahili and Guarani, I think that the Mayan language project was aborted for now.

    July 3, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan_Eo

    My guesses: - Sioux - Hawaiian - Cherokee - Yup'ik - Navajo - Shoshoni

    I'm personally hoping they add at least one critically endangered language (all of the above are actually "vulnerable", the least endangered category according to UNESCO's definition) but I'm not sure Duolingo would really want to put the effort into supporting a language that literally has only hundreds of speakers left, or even less. The above are usually around a couple thousand, at least, and are still absolutely worthy of conservation efforts.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

    Hawaiian would be cool! And so would Icelandic.

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irusejka

    Icelandic is not endangered, although it has not much speakers.

    February 29, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

    I heard Pawnee it critically endangered. I think there are less than 100 people who speak it and they all live in a town in Oklahoma

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/underwood.jones

    I'm going to guess that's in Miami county...a lot of smaller tribes were "consolidated" and moved to the northeast. Sadly, Wyandotte and other languages died out altogether there. Wyandotte was heavily documented by a linguist and there was a push recently to revive it, but it did not catch on and it wasn't truly documented enough to fully reconstruct. Hopefully humankind can keep other languages from sharing its fate!!

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

    In Pawnee, it is rare to have a sentence without at least one 30 syllable word. Duolingo course indeed.

    February 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaratea

    I have a feeling they meant 5 endangered languages of any culture, not only Native American.

    December 12, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

    I'm guessing we'll get Cherokee and at least one other Native American language, and the rest would be from other areas... which would be only fair.

    January 31, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

    I think so too.

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

    SCOTTISH GAELIGE | CHEROKEE | MAORI | CHICKSAW | CORNISH!

    January 30, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

    Now there are choices I truly like.

    March 17, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotCiro

    :D

    March 17, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aokoye

    I'm almost positive Hmong isn't considered an endangered language...

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xefjord

    Hmm... I always heard my Hmong friends complaining about all of their generation forgetting the language o_o So I thought it was endangered.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

    I was living in California when the Hmongs were brought to this country. They had only had a written language for about 30 years at that time. As far as I know, they do still teach it to their children because when my children were in school in California one of the problems in Fresno County was so many Hmong children who required bilingual classes in order to function in public schools. California is a minority majority state, but the highest minority has gone from being Hispanic to being Asian in less than 20 years.

    March 16, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

    As someone already pointed out, they talked about adding a Mayan language. They might also consider Nahuatl.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica4201

    I would love to see Haida added, as there are only 20 mostly elderly speakers left in the world. Efforts are underway to revive it, and Duolingo would be an excellent tool for that endeavor.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwenH_zhanghao1

    Mayan, Manchu, Sanskirt?

    December 20, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shukladhaivat17

    Sanskrit, yeṣ... I am eagerly waiting for this beauty...

    January 30, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

    Sanskrit does have a good base of speakers, though. However, it seems like it would be considered for this project.

    February 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimLeonard0

    I wonder if Ainu is being considered. I think there are not many speakers, but it is one that I have heard of, and there are people that want to revitalize it.

    March 16, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Herasmuse

    Well, all (natural) languages are native to somewhere ;)

    March 21, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

    There will probably be one from NA, SA, Africa, Asia, and Australia. That would make sense since languages are dying all over the world. Even in Europe there are some small languages that are falling in number of speakers, but not so drastically as everywhere else.

    February 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadowhawk.js

    I've emailed the Cherokee Nation about Duolingo in the past as well. They seem like the type to like the idea, since they have free language courses on their website. I'm also interested in learning other Iroqouian languages, most of them are extremely endangered with only a few fluent speakers left, and they are wildly complicated. It comes from having so many different cultures converging in one area I believe, gave them a unique flow.

    Mayan would also be great, I've looked into learning the Ch'ol dialect, which is the closest existing to Classical Mayan, and even considered visiting Guatemala or Honduras where people still speak it. I wonder what else they have in mind? I think an Australian or Khoisan language would be fun, since their cultures are ancient.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

    About Mayan: I was wondering which dialect would be taught, too. My guess would be K'iche' as it has the most speakers in Guatemala. Like you, I think that the Ch'ol dialect would be great to learn because it is thought to be closest to Classical Mayan . . . but is there any Classical Mayan left to read beyond inscriptions?

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadowhawk.js

    Classical Mayan is like Egyptian Hieroglyphs, they are conceptual or pictographs, not really read. I think there is a word connected to each glyph, but its vastly different from western literature. The Greeks saw written texts as a recording, and would read it aloud in their own voice because our texts were always supposed to represent spoken word. In many other cultures (Egyptian, Chinese, and Mayan) its more the imagery to visualize a story. Technically, ancient Egyptian, Mayan or modern Chinese could be "read" by anyone regardless of their language so long as they understand the symbolism.

    Ch'ol is pretty scarce today yes, something like 10,000 speakers at most last I checked, and its split between two countries. Though I think it would be cool for its historical context, but if they are going with Otali based on number of speakers I imagine they will likely do the same with Mayan as well and do K'iche'.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

    What you said regarding written Chinese, Mayan and Ancient Egyptian is a very common misconception, but incorrect. They are true and complete writing systems that also fully represent the spoken language, they just aren't alphabetic.

    For starters, Chinese is not hieroglyphic. True pictograms represent maybe about 5-10% of the characters in existence. But furthermore you can't read a text in modern Chinese without actually knowing the vocabulary and grammar of modern Chinese. Even a highly educated speaker of Japanese, who might know 20,000 characters, can't actually "read" a text in modern Chinese (though they could guess what it's about).

    Equally, Mayan and ancient Egyptian were not "just pictures". It's actually a mixture of true pictograms and various phonetic characters and a syllabary layered on top of each other. Both of them have systems that you can render all words phonetically if you chose to. If you don't know the spoken language, you can't fully read them.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadowhawk.js

    I did not mean to imply they were "just pictures". I said they were closer to pictographs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pictogram

    Chinese is not hieroglyphic, they just have (some) symbols derived from a resemblance to physical objects. I just meant that it was more conceptual than phonetic like Western languages.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

    Luis von Ahn is from Guatemala, and my conjecture is that the Mayan language that he prefers is the one being worked on. K'iche' is purerly a guess.

    Well, my question was really about how much is actually available to read in Classical Mayan. Is there much more than King lists and dates? I really don't know.

    Also, I thought that nowadays (since the 1980s or so) the Mayan script has been thought to be not only logographic but also syllabographic and related to a particular language. See, for example this .pdf. However, this is all fairly new to me, and I simply don't know.

    January 13, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xoboo

    I actually took a class with a proff fluent in Kitche and we read the popul vu (a religious text) so there are still lots of ancient Mayan texts. Sadly the Spanish destroyed a large chunk if not most material. However Mayan is still spoken by a big population so I imagine there's even a lot of modern literature.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mayan_literature

    January 31, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

    I actually took a class with a proff fluent in Kitche and we read the popul vu . . .

    That is so cool! I bet that was really fascinating.

    The Mayan I'm talking about was older and (it is thought) a different dialect or language, as it was from more than 800 years before the Popul Vuh was written down. However, from the little I've read, there doesn't seem to be much remaining other than inscriptions on stelae. I really don't know how different the various Mayan languages are.

    Maybe Kitche would be the way to go, as there sounds like there's more to read, and it's a language that is still spoken. I don't know which variety Duo is planning to present.

    February 1, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReidHT

    I agree with you in that they should add the Iroquoian languages.. Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga and Oneida are severely endangered, while Tuscarora is nearly extinct. Plus, Cherokee is actually an Iroquoian language too. I think they have a good shot at adding Mohawk, and possibly Cayuga as it is right now...

    December 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadowhawk.js

    Southern Iroquoian, which gives it a different flavor, but it still sounds much the same. I'm curious if they'd be teaching the Eastern or Western dialect. There is a pretty big difference between the two, something like 60 extra syllables in the Western dialect that don't even exist in the East, not to mention all the loan words they acquired from Western tribes that those sounds are used for. The Western dialect is much more commonly spoken, and promoted more, but its also crazy complicated and not as "authentic" some think. I'd actually really like to learn Mohawk, or any northern language.

    December 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReidHT

    Hmm... you know, that brings up a whole new question for Duolingo of what dialects to add- like if they should add one, or add multiple. I guess it's a question the creators will have to ask as they add smaller, endangered languages like many Native American languages.

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

    If each dialect would require a whole separate project, then it's not likely.

    It will probably depend on who they can get to work on it - I would guess that for Cherokee for example, it is most likely that the Western (Overhill) dialect would be used, as it has a much greater number of speakers and teachers available. Plus, the Cherokee Nation and Keetowah Band both use and promote western Cherokee.

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

    That sounds about right. My uncle is part Cherokee, I'll ask him if he knows anybody who is connected to the community... Although I think he's got about as much Cherokee as Elvis and Johnny Depp (ie had a Cherokee great great great great grandsomething).

    December 15, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadowhawk.js

    v-v, Western/Otali has much stronger representation. Especially considering many in Oklahoma moved to California during the Dust Bowl, so there are strong familial ties and Cherokee satellites as far flung as Los Angeles now. According to Wikipedia, there are nearly ten times the number of speakers in Otali.

    December 14, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eikoopmit

    Scottish Gaelic and West Frisian, please.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeteFromDarwin

    Or Scots, the forgotten and abandoned twin sister of English with a scattered and beautiful literature.

    December 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eikoopmit

    Scots is cool as well, but as Scots and English are mutually intelligible and there's unfortunately a limit at five endangered languages, unfortunately I don't think that Scots will as likely be added to the incubator as most other languages.

    December 12, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeteFromDarwin

    I certainly have more difficulty with Scots in a domestic register as an English speaker than understanding West Frisian as a Dutch speaker, but I totally get your point :-)

    December 12, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

    I agree with you. Also maybe Icelandic? I'm not very interested in Native American languages.

    December 14, 2015

    [deactivated user]

      WOOOHOOO! AMAZING Can't wait!!!!!!! WHo knows, maybe i'll give Cherokee a try when it comes out!!!!!

      way to go, Duolingo!

      December 10, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vegjjany

      I really would like to learn Cree, but it isn't a language from US (it is from Canada)... I can just hope for it. Anyways, Cherokee will be an amazing addition and I surely will learn it.

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DasKevino

      Cree would be a great language for this. It's somewhat at risk, but, with it's current ~100,000 speakers, it has the potential to survive in the long run.

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vegjjany

      Thanks for share it, these are very interesting infos :)

      December 12, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsue

      You're welcome. :)

      December 12, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      FWIW, Cree does cross the border into the US in a few places.

      But either way - I would expect that they aren't restricting their endangered languages project to only US languages.

      As far as Native American languages go - I would guess the most likely are Navajo, Cherokee and Cree. Simply because they seem to have the highest profile and materials available. Navajo especially might be the one with the most access to speakers and teachers who could come on as team members?

      Also - Nahuatl or maybe Yucatec Maya?

      Inuktitut?

      Would they do Inuktitut or Cree in syallabics? That would be awesome, but might take some major tinkering with the Duolingo interface?

      But leaving the Americas for a moment... Did I hear anyone say BASQUE?!!!!

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vegjjany

      Yeah, I am hoping to see Tupi and Mirandese courses (both for Portuguese speakers) here. Basque would be a great addition, as well as Galician, Occitan and Romansh.

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doktorkampi

      Occitan :D

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrangeFruit

      I so agree with Mirandese!

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irusejka

      Greenlandic!

      February 6, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaratea

      I was thinking about Basque too^^ Also Romani, Rusyn, Yiddish or Siberian/ Uralic ethnic minorities

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Yiddish is already in the incubator. However, progress on it seems to have stalled, there haven't been any updates from the Yiddish team in quite some months...

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amaratea

      True, but I still hope they plan to do something with it...

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsue

      Written Cree uses those syllabics: http://www.omniglot.com/writing/cree.htm (which also says "Modified versions of this syllabary are used to write: Blackfoot, Ojibwe, Carrier, Slavey, Naskapi and Inuktitut.")

      Written Inuktitut uses those syllabics sometimes, Latin letters sometimes, even Cyrillic sometimes in the dialects used in Siberia. There's more about this at these links:

      http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/with-nine-written-versions-and-two-alphabets-inuit-language-finally-getting-much-needed-makeover

      http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2015/08/28/major-change-proposed-for-inuit-writing/.

      http://www.omniglot.com/writing/inuktitut.htm

      Which script Duolingo uses for a language should be up to whichever group of native speakers teams up with Duolingo.

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Oh wow, those are some interesting news articles. I would be a bit sad to see the syllabics dropped altogether, but I guess if the only ones using them regularly even in Nunavut are teachers and translators, then it makes sense to switch to Latin script for everyday usage.

      And I guess I can see why adopting a written standard is a good idea, at least on paper. Although the various dialect speakers of some other minority languages have found that a sore point in the past (e.g. the Caighdeán oifigiúil in Ireland etc).

      To be picky though - "Inuktitut" has never to my knowledge been written in Cyrillic, as the word Inuktitut only refers to Canadian varieties. Inuit languages spoken in Alaska or Russia (or Greenland for that matter) aren't part of Inuktitut, although they are part of the same overall dialect continuum.

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsue

      I stand corrected, thanks! :) What is the name of the overall dialect continuum?

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Just "Inuit languages". They form a dialect continuum, with the individual varieties nowadays often being considered separate languages, ranging from Greenland in the east to the tip of Alaska in the west, historically also into Chukotka (Russia).

      Greenlandic is standardised under the name Kalaallisut (and it is the national language there). It's quite a bit different to the Canada varieties.

      The Alaskan varieties are severely endangered.

      In Canada, people often call all the Canadian varieties "Inuktitut" but even then, linguists would mostly argue that is only the name of the Nunavut variety as spoken in Iqaluit etc.

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwertylaal

      Cornish, Manx, or any of the other Celtic languages.

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      I would vote for Breton. In the meantime, I will listen to Alan Stivell.

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oskalingo

      I would also vote for Breton, but in the meantime we can consider ourselves lucky in getting its close Brythonic relative, Welsh.

      January 14, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      Welsh, Breton, Cornish are mutual intelligble... as Welsh was just released.... Idk if we'd get it

      January 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReidHT

      This is awesome! I hope that in the future, they add some European and Asian endangered languages too... In Europe, Romani is endangered, supposedly Walloon is too, Provençal in France, Cornish and Manx are critically endangered, and many others. But for now, I'm really excited to have them add Cherokee and I hope they add one of the other Iroquois languages, Arapaho, Massachusett and Hawaiian.

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Well, they've already got Irish which is definitely endangered as a community language, even though it's got a big learner community. Ditto for Welsh.

      As far as European endangered languages go, I'd be quite interested in Basque, Breton and either flavour of Sorbian.

      Oh, and also, if you hang out on threads to do with Finnish, someone ALWAYS eventually brings up Sami :)

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlufflePuffPony

      You are right. Walloon is endangered, because it has no standardized orthography, and is no longer an actively used language in Wallonia (darned French). I'm trying to learn something about it, but it's very hard... there is no instructional material.

      November 13, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeteFromDarwin

      Have you found the Wallon grammar (in French) at http://users.skynet.be/lorint/croejh/node171.html?

      November 13, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlufflePuffPony

      I have! However, it would take a lot of work to learn from, seeing as it's not organized for a beginner.

      November 14, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/het_aapje

      Hopefully Assyrian (Neo-Aramaic) is added too :)

      December 27, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinefrostLTU

      How about the unheard of language of Latgalian? 165,000 is not nearly enough speakers for a Baltic language...

      :)

      January 6, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanAJParry

      I'm just gonna say: Ainu.

      January 13, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinefrostLTU

      I hope Breton and Greenlandic are included.

      January 13, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irusejka

      Three lingots for Greenlandic!

      January 30, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      As much as I'd like a Breton and Cornish course, I doubt they'd work on it for a while because of the mutual intelligibility between that and Welsh which was just released.

      January 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irusejka

      Greenlandic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It would be very interesting. The language sounds nice and unusual.

      January 30, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hickory_2120

      Cherokee needs to be one because I am part Cherokee

      February 7, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

      I'm excited for Cherokee to be added! Not only is it still spoken in Oklahoma, but also in North Carolina. In North Carolina there is a town called Cherokee where you cannot own property there until you are a member of the tribe. In Oklahoma I used to live in the section that is the Cherokee Nation and many of my students were Cherokee.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      Fascinating :) They are giving Anishnaabe (sp?) lessons at my university in northern U.S. I would love to learn a Native American language, I'll definitely work on Cherokee if it comes out, but I still have to investigate the sounds of each and pick one. Navajo and Cherokee I believe are the two most widely spoken NA languages, but I hear Navajo is very hard. (I mean, come on, didn't they use it for code during WWII?) That could just be because the Japanese had no information or resources and that is why they couldn't crack it. Anyways! I'm rambling. I am interested in NA languages because of such difference of sound.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

      Oklahoma even has an test where teachers who know Cherokee can take the test and add it to their teaching certificate. That is something I would love to be able to do. I have no idea if North Carolina has the same option, although I would suspect that they do. Perhaps South Dakota and other states with large reservations have the same option for their local Native American languages. Navajo would be fascinating to learn.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      I totally agree.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseDG1

      I'd love to see the various dialects of Italian offered. Kashubian would also be interesting...

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eikoopmit

      I'd love to know how to say "Luca Brasi is sleeping with the fishes" in Sicilian using a method other than giving someone a fish.

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseDG1

      LOL!

      In all seriousness -- I want to learn Lombard, since it's what my great-grandparents spoke. :)

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyneweard

      If you want to learn the language, I know a bit of Lombard, as I'm from Lombardy

      October 11, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italianboy96

      I'd love to see Latin and Ancient Greek be two of the five,

      December 12, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

      I really want to see Latin added.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisLouieLou

      Very interesting and wonderful idea. Would be very nice to see Native American and other endangered indigenous languages protected and allowed to find fertile minds to take root in, via Duolingo's incredibly rich environment. Long live Duolingo and the generosity of those that make it possible!

      December 14, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      Any update thread?

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah_B_16

      No, not currently. However I will probably ask for an update by April if there aren't any Cherokee or other endangered language courses by then. During an interview though, Luis mentioned a plan to put a few native american languages on Duolingo, here it the article: https://www.quora.com/Luis-Von-Ahn-What-would-it-take-to-start-a-partnership-with-a-Native-American-tribe-using-Duolingo%E2%80%99s-technology-to-propel-a-Language-Nest-initiative which means it is likely we could begin to see some endangered native languages here soon.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      Thank you.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica4201

      This is awesome news. I've tried to get information on learning Native American languages, but the resources are either nonexistent or too expensive, including for languages spoken locally in my area. I'd love to see Duolingo change that. :)

      December 10, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sommerlied

      Amazing!! Thanks for your effort and this great news!

      December 10, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flootzavut

      That's fantastic news! :D

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Footsore_Rambler

      That's wonderful! I'm thrilled to hear it! (I hope one of them is Navajo ... fingers crossed)

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mduffy19

      Haitian Creole should be added to duolingo. Its a great language to know if you live in southern florida.

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stardust103158

      That's actually a really good option.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinefrostLTU

      When I visited, I could only find Spanish, Haitian Creole, and Portuguese speakers.

      January 13, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwenH_zhanghao1

      Duolingo! Will you pick Manchu? I would like to learn it!

      December 20, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azn.Bby.Girl

      So, does that mean that our hmong language will be part of the 5 chosen languages???

      January 24, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      I just really hope for Basque, Yiddish and any widely-spoken NA language. Perhaps they'll try to get new Yiddish contributors as it is truly dying but according to the incubator, not being worked on.

      I'd vote for Cornish or Breton but because of the intelligibility with Welsh that was released I think this year we should concentrate on other languages... but if one finds its way to the incubator it'd be cool.

      Old English? Aren't some Indian languages becoming less used because of the rise of Hindi and Tamil?

      January 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwenH_zhanghao1

      Wow! Old English? Old English has some weird symbols like þðȝ⁊æœƿᵹ…

      February 2, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

      Thorn and Eth are really the only new ones you would have to learn.

      March 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauBofill

      Basque would be awesome. There are quite a few volunteers who could contribute to this course...Though any other endangered language would be great too, of course ;)

      March 24, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crush

      I wouldn't consider Basque an "endangered language" by any means, though. Perhaps certain Basque dialects. But we've already had quite a few people send applications in to the incubator, i think it's just a matter of time (Duolingo finding the resources and us keeping up the pressure) before it gets added.

      Seeing more indigenous languages (Quechua, Mapudungun, Nahuatl) would be great, too.

      March 25, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauBofill

      Noski ezetz ;) I wouldn't consider it endangered as a whole either, though it is a minority language which I think also interests Duolingo.

      March 28, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crush

      Definitely, i also think it would benefit enormously from a course here at Duolingo :)

      March 28, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/princessmiwi

      wow, it would be just great to see Duolingo help save endangered languages! you go, Duo!

      December 12, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pratyush.

      I wonder when will those languages come. I will be awesome to have those languages here.

      December 13, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

      I wonder how they will select those 5 languages?
      There are a pretty huge amount to save: endangeredlanguages.com.

      Will they try to add one by continent (except Antartica ;)): well, there would be one among Asia, Europe, North America or South America (depending on how you count the continents) that would not be represented (looking at the map and the proportions of endangered languages, "should" be Europe to be left "orphan" :().

      Will they tend to add languages very very endangered, the one that need more help but thus harder to create the course, or endangered but not too much thus easier to create the course?
      If Cherokee is likely to be one of the 5 (cf. Duo's answer) then the choice is the latest. Thus looking at those "orange" (on the map) dots, how to choose among them?
      Looking at the density of dots: Mexico, Nigeria, Himlayan region, Papua New Guinea/Indonesia looks like in good place (and on different continent) to have one of their endangered language chosen. then the fifth? Well, Amazonian area seems to

      1. have quite high density too
      2. Be on another continent than the 4 listed above.

      But well, if Cherokee is likely to be in the list, it's that the criterias involve other things (if they even involve the above). Which makes sense. For example, if you want US politics to get involved, you need at least one US native language. But will it be only one?

      Well, I'm impatient to see Duo's choice. ;)

      December 20, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      Great news!

      January 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaGlynn

      I am from central Australia. People from Alice springs and the surrounding area speak Arrernte. My family speak Kaytetye, but with only 300 speakers there woudn't be enough bilingual volunteers that have the literacy rates in english to contribute. However, I would love to coordinate a team of bilingual volunteers for ARRERNTE to get it up and running in the incubator! After speaking to a number of people, I have found 15 native speakers (who are fluent in English) and a few linguists who would be keen to contribute. There are several schools that teach Arrernte in Alice springs, and people would be very excited to work towards its graduation from the incubator. I am not sure if Duolingo would be interested in a language with only 3000 native speakers, but it has the opportunity to attract so many Australians and international learners who want to learn more about Indigenous culture. Using duolingo architecture, we could ensure the language prospers for many years to come!!

      July 8, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizsue

      Wow! :D

      December 11, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Quizzical

      Yes, 5 more languages will be great. Especially because they are endangered. Duolingo promised to put endangered languages in priority and already have Welsh, Irish, Yiddish and Cantonese.

      "We will be able to add 5 courses" So will this be replacing 5 courses in the incubator currently? Will this fill up the incubator for a couple months?

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Haven't seen Canto in here, you might have confused it with something else?

      Anyways... Canto isn't really "endangered" in any global sense. Cantonese has an enormous popular culture film/music industry and literally millions of speakers, plus a whole society/media/education system in Hong Kong that uses Cantonese pretty much for everything. Compared with something like Cherokee with about 10,000 speakers being considered relatively healthy by US indigenous standards.

      As for the other question - it won't replace anything already in the incubator. It would be pretty mean spirited of Duolingo to boot out any groups that were half-finished. Unless it was a group which had completely ceased to make progress (possibly the case with Yiddish at the moment).

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Quizzical

      Sorry. I meant Catalan. Yesterday when I looked up Catalan I thought the pages said Catalan was endangered, but my new searches tell me it is not. Whoops.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avrichard

      Haha, no worries... Catalan is an interesting one, the definition of "endangered" is something we could discuss for a long time.

      It is definitely endangered in the traditional Catalan-speaking areas of France. But then over the border into Spain (or more accurately Catalonia) it's the official language and you can live your life only using Catalan, with media, schools, courts, government etc... Although still under a bit of pressure from Spanish, and back in the days of Franco, use of Catalan in Spain was banned. But these days it's fairly healthy, it's in a better position than Basque or Galician at least.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarefo
      • 1032

      My heart just stopped when I read "Cantonese" :P First, there has to be Mandarin (2017?…), then, one can hope, Cantonese will not be too far away.

      January 6, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

      So will this be replacing 5 courses in the incubator currently?

      "replacing"? Duo never kick out courses from incub. to add more.

      Will this fill up the incubator for a couple months?

      There are no fix limit of number of courses in Phase1... But since Duo has an empirical average of one new course added into Phase1 every 11 days, it's likely that if they add those 5 together then the probability they add another course during the following weeks will be lower (than if they hadn't add those 5 courses).

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Quizzical

      By "replacing" I mean that those 5 courses would be started once other courses have graduated the incubator.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

      There is no such thing as a "fixed number of slot" in Phase1 in incubator.

      If you have a look to the link I gave, in average:

      • one course is added in Phase1 every 11 days
      • one course go out of Phase1 (into Phase2=beta) every 17 days

      So the number of Phase1 courses is increasing (in average) over the time: no such thing as a "fixed number of slot" in Phase1 in incubator.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrangeFruit

      Cantonese?

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Quizzical

      Sorry. I meant Catalan. Yesterday when I looked up Catalan I thought the pages said Catalan was endangered, but my new searches tell me it is not. Whoops.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrangeFruit

      Oh, okay. That makes much more sense.

      January 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

      No, in fact, Catalan speakers were suppressed by the Spanish government for so long that some of the more extreme Independent-seeking folk suppress Spanish. So basically, don't go to Barcelona or Valencia if you ever want to immerse/study abroad for Spanish. Catalan is on the rise quickly.

      March 16, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MemeCrusader

      The Hiri Motu language would be great.

      March 31, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/syc200123

      Hi guys,

      I'm working for a language IT consulting company called Appen in Australia. We are currently running few language-related projects to improve the current language systems (voice recognition, keyboard etc.) used on some PC and mobile devices for the language and we're searching for Cherokee, Frisian, Kalaallisut and Maori speakers to help with the creation of a wordlist. We found it extremely difficult to find those speakers so it would be very helpful if someone could spread the words and let people know about this project, I am sure someone could find it interesting.

      Here is the link to apply in case you are interested: https://goo.gl/XbJQIB.

      Many thanks for your help!

      Veronika

      October 11, 2016
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