"My mamy ciasteczka."

Translation:We have cookies.

December 10, 2015

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kebukebu

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Suprnova123

For anyone who can't understand it, "it means come to the dark side, we have cookies!". :)

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/richardensor

Great! One question though: is "ciasteczka" the diminutive for cookies?

December 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pietrek92

Yes

December 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/idanlipin

Cake -> cookie -> small cookie = ciasto -> ciastko -> ciasteczko

May 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff204657

wwww

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CFCHAZARD10

XD

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuliy976593

Duolingo mówi ze ma byc "we have SOME cookies"

May 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Może być, nie 'ma być'.

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SpiralStat

I love the Duolingo community so much :')

June 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MS_Genius88

To mi się podoba!

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alex_tv80

Great picture ))

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ehsan_Mehmed

a lingot for you :D

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

How did I miss this before? You win the Internet for that lmao.

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne

Wow what a beautiful word for cookies. I'll never bake the same way again! :)

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimker

"Частичка" means "a tiny thing/part/particle" in Russian. So this word is twice as confusing for me.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/yarjka

Surely related to "тесто" (dough, pastry) though.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dimker

Oh, that clears out the origin of the word now, thank you.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LucySalamence

Частичка is cząsteczka in polish

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A3702

I can speak Polish nearly fluently but trying to turn that into text really makes me think for a while.

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

I can't decide if that's encouraging - because someone who can speak it still struggles with the writing - or depressing/terrifying, as a learner LOL 8-o

December 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NeldeParis

My problem is that I've lived in Poland for 25 years, never took any lessons (when I was younger and it was easier to learn a language) and spent all my time in an environment where someone spoke English (I was training English teachers) so I never really 'had to' learn Polish to survive. Now I understand a LOT (depending on the context and how fast someone speaks), but ask me to respond or take part in a conversation and.... pffft. I sound like a child raised by wolves or something, and it's quite stressful. So my problem is that it's too easy just to translate the sentences correctly into English and move on. I need to slow down and really learn the Polish, and especially work on practices where I have to write it in Polish and say it. I'm hoping that by the end of this course, I won't be such a total embarrassment to myself when someone who has only been here a year has to do all the talking just to order in a cafe. Sheesh!

April 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JakubWrobel

if you need help feel free to ask me bcause i am a native speaker

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/geowoj

I sat at my computer for 5 minutes trying to remember how to pronounce "ciasteczka"

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alyssa18223

Heres how i remember it (CHEST-ITCH-KA

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje

Can "ciasteczka" be translated as biscuits?

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilMcQ

Yes ciasteczko can be translated to biscuit. Cookie is an American word!

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje

That makes sense, I don't always know when they're synonymous XD

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ann666
  • 2067

"Biscuit" is "herbatnik" in Polish :)

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje

Dzięki :D

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzegorzZa35157

I would say Ciastka. But yes its same i think

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JagodaKuro
July 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AstroVulpes

Join the dark side, we have cookies!

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mogyi-modz

In Hungarian is similar tészta = ciastka. We use it for pasta and cakes/cookies. I normally can find a little mod to make Polish words easy to remember here just had to swap the first letter the rest is pronounced very similarly

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/wilson.lindab

Why is the plural of ciasteczko not ciasteczki?

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/4d1n

"Ciasteczko" is a neutral gender. Most of polish neutral words in plural ends with "-a" "-ta". "-i" is a typical ending of feminine plural forms.

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/FloS13

Is the my in 'my mamy' not too much? Mamy already says 'we have', so isn't it like 'we we have'?

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

Polish is a pro-drop language, so you can leave off the pronoun, but you don't have to, afaik. It's correct to use either. I think it's more usual not to use it, but I don't think either is 'wrong'. Native speakers would be able to elucidate further... :)

With the disclaimer that I'm not a native speaker of either language, Polish seems more inclined to drop pronouns than Russian, even though I believe they're both classified as pro-drop languages.

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano

I’m a native speaker of two Slavic languages (not Polish though). What flootzavut wrote seems correct to me. “My mamy” = a pronoun + a conjugated verb in the present, that implies usage of the aforesaid pronoun, so there’s no harm in dropping it. Although, in Polish it seems more common than in Ukrainian or Russian.

For example, in English it is possible to say: Q: why didn't you answer my calls last night? A: was busy. This is not grammatically correct in English, although one can drop a pronoun in their speech when it's obvious in the context. In Polish it's more fixed in the grammar due to conjugation.

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

I'm glad it's not just me who has that perception of pro-drop tendencies with Russian (and Ukrainian) - I am guessing, though trying not to assume, that those are your two native tongues?

I managed to go through Russian to an honours degree level without ever even coming across the term pro-drop LOL even after spending a year learning Croatian as an elective, which is decidedly more pro-drop happy than Russian headdesk absurd, I know.

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano

Yep, those are my native languages :) In terms of pronoun usage, Polish very much reminds me of Spanish. And from my profound knowledge of the South Slavic languages (that comes from reading “Let it go” lyrics in Serbian :D), Serbian and Croatian indeed are more pro-drop than Russian, and probably just a little less than Polish.

In Russian and Ukrainian we usually drop a pronoun to avoid redundancy in a sentence (after the initial pronoun). Basically the purpose of pro-dropping is to make a sentence... Neat? But it’s 100% grammatical to use as much pronouns as in English.

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

And from my profound knowledge of the South Slavic languages (that comes from reading “Let it go” lyrics in Serbian :D)

This made me laugh aloud, thanks ;D

It is a very, very long time since I actually studied Croatian, but I think maybe the past tense in Croatian is more like Russian and less like Polish, so probably requires pronouns more than Polish, with its very specific past tenses. But my Croatian was one year's worth of uni fifteen years ago, so I don't know how accurate my recollection is. I have been searching for my language books for months and not finding them, so I can't check 8-p

It often boggles me how many little details I either missed or forgot after studying Russian so intensely. I don't know that it ever registered it was even okay to drop pronouns, though I presume I probably picked it up somewhat when I lived in Russia.

December 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano

As usual, when you are in a language environment you pick up clusters of information just like idiomatic phrases, without pondering over them too much :) Probably it was the case with Russian and its pronouns.

I'd like to see more Slavic languages here, on Duolingo, to make further comparison between them. At least one from the Balkan group would be great :)

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

I would absolutely love to see the Balkan languages make an appearance on Duolingo!

I am pretty sure I will continue the tradition of trying any Slavic language that appears (my main interest in Romanian is as a Romance language influenced by Slavic languages, I may be a little fixated ;)), but for it to be a South Slavic language would be a real bonus :D

December 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Balkan_Chick

I've been trying to sign up to help with adding Bulgarian to Duolingo, so your guys hopes might come true soon :)

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/alyssa18223

No but you dont need it because it is a simplifyed version if you dont use it. It is alittle like 'it is' compared to it's in english

April 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa679997

I also wondered this. I'm just starting out with polish. English is my first language and I am maybe 65% fluent in Spanish. I'm glad to see it can be said either way.

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sunstorm2204

Could someone conjugate the Polish "have"? I'm having trouble keeping up with we/you/I

December 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

1st sg: (ja) mam

2nd sg: (ty) masz

3rd sg: (on/ona/ono) ma

1st pl: (my) mamy

2nd pl: (wy) macie

3rd pl: (oni/one) mają

December 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano

These ciasteczka or these ciasteczka, please, help me to understand the distinction.

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/4d1n

It bases on size. Small - "ciasteczka", normal/large "ciastka". Personally I use "ciasteczka" only for small, crispy cookies, without cream. And of course for web cookies.

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Elenaverano

Thanks! How about the ones with cream?

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/4d1n

Just "ciastko"/"ciasto", eventually "ciastko z kremem".

December 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/tinyset

How the heck am I supposed to remember this word? :p

December 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80

At a first glance, I read "My mommy" :D

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/harthacanute

Come to the dark side, my mamy ciastezcka.....

January 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Radowicz

So, ciastko for one single cookie, and ciasteczka for several cookies..??

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/4d1n

Yes. Ciasto/ciacho/ciastko/ciasteczko singular, ciasta/ciacha/ciastka/ciasteczka plural

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Shougo_Kawada

Sounds similar to Ukrainian "тістечко" which means, as far as I understand, a quite different yet still related thing.

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ChunuMurmu

Why cant i use 'my maja ciasteczka' instead of 'my mamy ciastecKa??

January 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

Because mają (take note of the ogonek) is the third person plural (they) form of the verb. It would be like someone saying "They has" instead of "They have" in English.

(Non-native disclaimer in force.)

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sashkafix

Why does "We have an apple" is "Mamy jabłko" but "We have cookies" is "My mamy ciasteczka"? Does it have anything to do with being plural and singular?

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

No. It's just a choice of whoever put those sentences into the course.

"We have an apple" = "(My) mamy jabłko."

"We have cookies" - "(My) mamy ciasteczka."

In Polish, the personal pronoun is totally redundant for 1st and 2nd person, as the form of the verb makes it clear who's the subject. As 3rd person is concerned, it can be omitted as well, but it's not that common as with 1st and 2nd.

If you actually do use a pronoun for 1st and 2nd, it's as if you put more emphasis to it. So it's kinda like "WE have cookies".

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NeldeParis

Why couldn't I say, 'We have SOME cookies'? In some answers, I was able to say, 'They are eating some bread,' for example, rather than 'they are eating THE bread,' but it won't let me say, 'We have SOME cookies.'

April 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Well, technically those sentences would need 'trochę' + Genitive, but if we accept 'some' there, I guess it sounds reasonable here as well... Added.

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NeldeParis

OK, I can understand why 'bread' would be 'troche' (sorry, no Polish letters on my keyboard): we are eating 'a bit' of bread.

But this makes me wonder if 'some' cookies would be 'kilka' rather than 'troche', since cookies are countable. And thus to be perfectly correct, 'some cookies' would have to use 'kilka' and 'some bread' would have to use 'troche'.

So for me to be able to answer, 'We are eating some cookies,' the original sentence would have had to have used 'kilka' (or - how do you spell it - kilkanascie?)

What do you think?

Still, I think that in English, 'We are eating THE cookies' would mean, 'the particular cookies referenced in this context' ('Bill made some cookies.' 'We know. We are eating the cookies [that Bill made].') And 'some cookies' would mean, 'a quantity of cookies.'

I was just confused by 'some' being accepted as OK with bread, but not with cookies, because I know that in English, 'the' restricts the noun (in such a sentence) to cookies that are known about by both parties speaking (we're both thinking of the same cookies). So with no context, I thought 'some' was better than 'the' cookies here.

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Good point, "kilka" would make more sense here. Mamy kilka ciasteczek. Mamy trochę ciasteczek. Both seem fine, 'kilka' probably better.

I'd say that we should accept 'some' when it makes sense, but we rather can't make it the default sentence, as 'technically', from the point of grammar, it's an a bit different sentence. One that we haven't taught yet.

Sometimes we just can't be perfectly natural in both languages. And of course being natural in Polish is more important then.

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NeldeParis

Thanks again. Good to know that there's someone 'out there' who can answer questions authoritatively. I'm in Wroclaw, surrounded by Polish-speakers, but speaking your native language and being able to explain it are two different things.

April 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SherlockBond007

Funny story. When I was 20 I went to Poland. We were at a bar and I mentioned I wanted one of the cookies I had seen another patron eating. My friend Marek told me, "when the waitress comes, tell her 'po proszu ciastek.'" I did, to a shocked look. I'll leave it to you to figure out what I actually asked for.

January 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Pamienta

we have cakes Americanisms are Not used by English language speakers

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

Pamienta, people in America speak English, ergo cookies = used by English speakers. Duolingo is an American company, and they use American English as their primary mode of teaching and learning.

No matter how many posts you make about this, you will still be wrong.

(Not to mention that, for some kinds of biscuits, British speakers most certainly use the word cookie, I wouldn't be surprised to learn the same is true in other countries where cookie isn't the most common word.)

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Where do they say "cakes" anyway? In Britain if it's not "cookies", it's "biscuits".

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

Agreed. I'm really not sure why Pamienta has such a bee in his/her bonnet about this.

I believe ciastko (or ciasto?) can mean cake, though I'm not certain, but the consensus from native speakers seems to be more or less;

Personally I use "ciasteczka" only for small, crispy cookies, without cream. And of course for web cookies.

Small crispy cookies =/= cakes, and certainly web cookies are always cookies.

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

I reccomend google.pl search grafika/obrazy for words "ciastko" "ciastka" "ciasteczka", (not ciasteczko- also slang for sexy man) "ciasto", "herbatniki" "tort" "placek" to see different types of baked sweet things.

google images -ciastko

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut

Pamienta, American is not a language.

Duolingo is an American company; they generally accept British English (I have no idea about Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, etc), but they preferentially teach/accept American English, which makes sense, them being American and all.

The division you are trying to make between English and American does not exist. Americans speak English.

Either make your peace with that, or don't use an American site to learn a language.

Either way, please quit spamming.

Immery: I apologise this comes up as a reply to your post, this is Duolingo forum threading for you :-/

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Pamienta

Brilliant !! bardzo dobra Dziekujemy it is a " language Course " English / Polish Not American / Polish !

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Pamienta

cakes NOT American phrase " cookies !"

December 15, 2015
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