"Dziewczynka"

Translation:A girl

December 11, 2015

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JackVUL

This word makes me scared for the future lessons.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

What's the difference between "dziewczynka" and "dziewczyna"? Are they interchangeable, or are they different forms?

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/zim_ek

"Dziewczynka" (a little girl) is a diminutive form of "dziewczyna" (a girl).

The same goes with "chłopiec" (a little boy) and "chłopak".

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz

It's worth adding that dziewczyna/chłopak can also mean girlfriend/boyfriend.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Thanks!

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Thank you!

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

Also, "dziewczynka" is typically used when talking about young-children-kind-of-girls.

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Thank you!

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Olciax25

Dziewczyna is for older girls, and dziewczynka is for younger girls

December 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/carousel240

Can someone write out how this word would be said? I can't wrap my head around what letters are making what sound!

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Something like "jyev-chihn-kuh". The dzi combination is approximately j as in juice, and the cz is like a ch. A y is always ih, never ee. Hope that helps!

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jantek_Jantek

I think we should add here a note that we have soft and hard sounds. For example we have ć (ci) and cz. The first one is soft and and the second one is hard. English ch is something between two of them. Though English tch would sound more like the hard one. But I can't recall any English word where the soft ch is used. The soft sounds are pronounced with tongue and mouth bent quite like when saying the English yyy and the hard ones with the tongue touching the palate.

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/natemarz

The sounds exist in English, but they are allophones - the only difference is the position in a word relative to other sounds. So English "chin" or "chip" are close to ci and "chop" or "check" are closer to cz.

April 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mskycc3

As a native speaker of American English, I never thought there was a difference between "ch" and "tch", but I could be wrong...

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew_Phelps

There might not be that distinction in English. But in Polish, there really are different "ch" sounds.

July 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Thank you for clarifying. I'm not sure there are any English words using a soft ch, because I can't think of any either. But I do get what you're saying, I think. :-) Thanks!

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cwks-legia

I would just add that dzie combination is approximately j while dzi alone is more like g. "dzis" or "today" is said gee-s.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mskycc3

I think "j" and soft "g" make the same sound--at least where I come from (Florida, USA). :)

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

Thanks!

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Menelion

To y'all language geeks like me :): I know that all Polish words are stressed on the penultimate syllable. On the other part, here in the lesson I definitely hear that dziewczynka and mężczyzna are stressed on the antepenultimate (well, the third from the end) syllable. Is it my Ukrainian ear, the TTS gets it wrong or is it something related to y in the penult? Thanks!

January 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/freyka

Actually not all Polish words are stressed on the 2nd to last syllable, just most of them. There's an accent on the last syllable when the word is borrowed from French ( ateliER, juRY, meNU); in case of acronyms (PKS – pe-ka-ES, ); words with the added prefix arcy-, eks-, wice- to monosyllabic words ( wiceMISTRZ, eksMĄŻ). There are also some words that are stressed on the 3rd syllable to the last. Like words borrowed from latin with the suffix -ika, -yka in nominative (mateMAtyka, KRYtyka, PAnika, LOgika, loGIStyka); in ordinal numerals with the suffix -sta, -set (CZTErysta, PIĘciuset); and most verbs in the conditional mood (płaKAłabym, PŁAkałbyś, PŁAkałby) except for those in the 1st and 2nd person plural (płaKAlibyśmy, płaKAlibyście) those are stressed on the 4th syllable to last (!!!). "DziewCZYNka" and "mężCZYZna" are both stressed on the penultimate syllable. That's also how i hear it here.

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mskycc3

Well I thought I was a language geek, but now I feel like such a novice, lol. So...Polish pronunciation be like 'this is the rule, except when this is the rule, except when this is the rule...". XD Still, English is probably worse, lol.

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Menelion

Thanks a lot!

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bokauno

Can someone exain my how to pronounce y and ł?

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

ł is read just like English w. as to y - it's a sound that English language doesn't have. maybe listening to its pronunciation here, in Google translator, or somewhere else - is the thing to do? or maybe another Duolingo user can explain it, bc I can't.

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User

I would say that y is like the i in with. :-)

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kania336

It should be dziewczyna cuz dziewczynka means a little girl

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

Still, there's nothing wrong with calling a little girl just a "girl".

March 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lars336830

no, it's really weird to call a <10yo girl "dziewczyna" and an older girl, about 12+ would get offended by calling her "dziewczynka"

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Umlaut1947

can anyone explain why "a small girl" is considered wrong, but "a little girl" is given as a correct answer?

October 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

I believe it's just unidiomatic. "A small girl" sounds to me like a literally small girl. "A little girl" is closer to "a younger girl". Which is who "dziewczynka" is. Usually up to, let's say 13 years of age. But that's very subjective.

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sophie972273

How do I even remember that

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mhdyxlyly

Polish is very scary

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/CeliaDavids123

Always gets me

February 18, 2019
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