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"Chłopcy mają chleb."

Translation:The boys have bread.

2 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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The verb "to have" here is related only to possession, right? I'm asking since in English, it can also be used as a substitute of "eat/drink" (I'm having bread for breakfast). Dziękuję!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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Yes. In Polish the verb "mieć" has many meanings, the most important are "to own", "to hold" - but none of them means eating. See mieć:

mieć I

  1. to own
  2. to consist of, to include
  3. to be equipped with
  4. to experience some sensation
  5. to have a feature, opinion
  6. to be in relation with sb/sth
  7. to be in specified situation
  8. to take part in some experience
  9. to have some level of education
  10. (colloquial) to be in some spatial relation or to be in specified place or time

mieć II

  1. to have some sort of obligations or plans
  2. used in expressions meaning future with verb in infinitive
  3. used in expressions meaning past with verb in participle
  4. used in expressions meaning negation with verb in subjunctive
  5. used in expressions meaning doubt with verb in past tense

mieć się

  1. to be in certain condition
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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Thank you for the very thorough answer :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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Jak się masz? UA: jak sja majesz? So close!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magpie_gir
magpie_gir
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Mieć się and miewać się means the same: to be in a certain condition. These are personal questions. You do not ask strangers about their well-being in Poland with this questions. It would be like asking: Co Pan/Pani teraz czuje? - What do you feel now? You can use: Jak się Pan/Pani czuje? - How do you feel? (if someone don't looks good)

Jak się masz? = Jak się (teraz) czujesz? W jakim jesteś (teraz) nastroju? - How are you (feeling now)? What mood are you in (now)?
mieć się - is more used in context of now
Napisz, jak się mają rodzice. - Write what's going on with our parents. Sprawy mają się nieźle. = Wszystko w porządku - Things are going well . All right. -- Both things mean the same. But in second sentence person don't want tell you more about their personal life.

Jak się miewasz? = Jak się (ogólnie) czujesz? W jakim (ogólnie) jesteś nastroju? - How do you feel (generally)?
miewać się - is used for description of a longer time's perspective - It is used when we didn't saw someone for long time, but we know that that person had bad period in their life before (it's more personal question). Personaly I have never heard anyone say: "miewam się" but always "mam się" or more: Teraz czuję się nie najlepiej, ale ogólnie się poprawia. - I feel not good now, but my health is improving generally.

Both are imperfective verbs - there isn't perfective equivalent.

br0d4 wrote more about aspect in Polish here

TO HAVE Durative verbs:

"Mieć" [to have, to own] - joins two of meanings [to have, in given time], and [to have, to own always or often]. More about the meanings of verb "mieć" in this thread

"Miewać" [to have, sometimes] e.g. "miewam bóle głowy" [sometimes I have headaches];

Perfective verbs: do not exist.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenretten
jenretten
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It's hard to tell the pronunciation and forvo is not very clear either. Is the Chł combination said like "kw"? So Chłopcy sounds like kwohp-see? Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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No. "Ch" is pronounced like "H" (actually "ch" is harder and "h" softer, but very few people are able to distinguish these two). "Chłpcy" sound a bit like "Hwoptzi". Here is how other voices of Ivona speak it: Jacek, Jan, Agnieszka.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabe81
gabe81
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I think it's a misconception, based on different spelling of 'h' and 'ch' of people from south-eastern border, influenced by Ukrainian, where these are two different sounds - in model Polish 'h' and 'ch' are two ways of writing the same sound, as are 'ż' and 'rz'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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Not a misconception, but approved localism: http://sjp.pwn.pl/szukaj/wymowa-h.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabe81
gabe81
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If you had said, that it is a dialect thing - I would have agreed (in fact this is what I wrote as well). But you have written, that the sounds are similar, but not the same, which is not true, because in standard, model Polish they are (apart from some cases where voicing(?) happen, like in 'niechby' or 'klechda', and the sound of 'ch' is close to the voiced h similar to that in Ukrainian).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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The above explanations I would rather understand, that it is rather a matter of personal preference or family background, than any given dialect, as this originally occurred in several regions of Poland, and with the commixture of population after WWII - even in places where previously was not known. However I agree, that it is not a requirement by standard Polish, but also it is not an error.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Leaving aside the question of dialects within Polish, the Polish "h/ch" is not quite like the English "h," and may very well sound a bit like "k" to you. It's like the Scots "loch" or the Yiddish "chutzpah," formed in much the same way as a "k" except with more open airflow.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenretten
jenretten
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Thank you, I hear it there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/larry799380

why can't it be the boys have some bread?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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From the English speaker's point of view, it could be an acceptable answer, but from the learner's of Polish point of view - not necessary. Literally "The boys have some bread" would be "Chłopcy maja trochę chleba". The difference is important, because when having/holding/owning something as a whole without stating the amount, we use the Nominative case: chleb. But if we state any amount whatsoever (some, a little, a lot of, a piece of, etc.), the case must be changed to Genitive - but with Genitive, the plural goes to the description of amount only, as it is in English. Also, Genitive has to be used in negative sentence:

  • Chłopcy mają chleb [Accusative, singular] (The boys have a/the/one bread - depending on context, it assumes "a loaf of bread") - but:
  • Chłopcy mają trochę/dużo/mało chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have some/a lot of/a little of bread) - see EDIT below
  • Chłopcy mają bochen [Accusative, singular] chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have a loaf of bread) - nothing is assumed, the amount is given directly.
  • Chłopcy mają dwa chleby [Accusative, plural] (The boys have 2 breads - it assumes "2 loaves of bread").
  • Chłpcy mają dwa bochny [Accusative plural chleba [Genitive singular] (The boys have 2 loaves of bread) - see EDIT below
  • Chłopcy nie mają chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have no bread)

EDIT

It has drawn my attention, that "bread" behaves sometimes as uncountable, sometimes as countable noun:

1.Countables:

  • Mam bułkę (jedną bułkę) [Accusative singular] - I have a roll (one roll)
  • Mam trochę bułek [Genitve plural] - I have some rolls
  • Ja mam dwie bułki [Accusative plural] - I have two rolls
  • Mam dwa chleby [Accusative plural] - I have two "breads" (yes, I know that in English bread is a massive noun)
  • Nie mam bułek [Genitve plural] - I have no rolls
  • BUT: Nie mam żadnych chlebów [Genitve plural] - I have not any "breads"

2.Uncountables

  • Mam wodę [Accusative singular] - I have (some) water
  • Mam trochę wody [Genitive singular] - I have some water
  • Mam trochę chleba [Genitive singular] - I have some bread
  • Mam dwa kubki [Accusative plural] wody [Genitive singular] - I have 2 mugs of water
  • Mam dwa bochny [Accusative plural] chleba [Genitive singular] - I have 2 loaves of bread
  • Nie mam wody [Genitive singular] - I have no water
  • Nie mam żadnej wody [Genitive singular] - I have not any water (Attention: Nie mam żadnych wód [Genitive plural] - I have not any waters - may be also correct, but only if it is clear, that we are talking about various types of water, like bottles of mineral water from various producers)
  • Nie mam chleba [Genitive singular] - I have no bread
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dieprinzessin
dieprinzessin
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Thanks for this explicit and helpful explanation. Just one question. Isn't wodę ( bulkę...) in the accusative case? And wody genetive not nom. (In :I have no water)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CelioFM
CelioFM
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br0d4:

After “MAJĄ” comes a direct object, so we must use ACCUSATIVE or genitive, NEVER NOMINATIVE, I suppose. You wrote “NOMINATIVE” several times, by mistake, I suppose, instead of ACCUSATIVE or instead of GENITIVE. [Casually the accusative here is the same as the nominative.]

• Chłopcy mają chleb [[[***ACCUSATIVE, singular] (The boys have a/the/one bread - depending on context, it assumes "a loaf of bread") - but:

• Chłopcy mają trochę/dużo/mało chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have some/a lot of/a little of bread) - see EDIT below • Chłopcy mają bochen chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have a loaf of bread) - nothing is assumed, the amount is given directly.

• Chłopcy mają dwa chleby [[[***ACCUSATIVE, plural] (The boys have 2 breads - it assumes "2 loaves of bread"). [here is 2-3-4ACCUSATIVE ]

• Chłopcy mają dwa bochny chleba [loaves in [[[***ACCUSATIVE plural, bread in Genitive singular] (The boys have 2 loaves of bread) - see EDIT below

• Chłopcy nie mają chleba [Genitive, singular] (The boys have no bread)

EDIT

It has drawn my attention, that "bread" behaves sometimes as uncountable, sometimes as countable noun:

1.Countables: • Mam bułkę (jedną bułkę) [[[***ACCUSATIVE singular] - I have a roll (one roll)

• Mam trochę bułek [Genitive plural] - I have some rolls

• Ja mam dwie bułki [[[ACCUSATIVE plural] - I have two rolls •
• Mam dwa chleby [[[
ACCUSATIVE plural] - I have two "breads" (yes, I know that in English bread is a massive noun)

• Nie mam bułek [Genitive plural] - I have no rolls • BUT: Nie mam żadnych chlebów [Genitive plural] - I have not any "breads"

2.Uncountables • Mam wodę [[[***ACCUSATIVE singular] - I have (some) water

• Mam trochę wody [Genitive singular] - I have some water • Mam trochę chleba [Genitive singular] - I have some bread

• Mam dwa kubki [[[***ACCUSATIVE plural] wody [Genitive singular] - I have 2 mugs of water

• Mam dwa bochny [[[***ACCUSATIVE plural] chleba [Genitive singular] - I have 2 loaves of bread

• Nie mam wody [[[***GENITIVE singular] - I have no water

• Nie mam żadnej wody [[[[***GENITIVE singular] - I have not any water (Attention:

Nie mam żadnych wód [[[[***GENITIVE plural] - I have not any waters - may be also correct, but only if it is clear, that we are talking about various types of water, like bottles of mineral water from various producers)

• Nie mam chleba [[[***GENITIVE singular] - I have no bread

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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You are generally right: at all places where was written Nominative, it should be Accusative. I have checked through my previous post and made corrections, but not exactly as you suggest, eg. the last "nie mam chleba" is Genitive.

BTW, months after creating this post I made a longer explanation about what is Genitive case useful for, it may be also helpful: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/16569658

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CelioFM
CelioFM
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Ok! Fixed the typo: "genitive", instead of "accusative".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dont_tread_on_me
dont_tread_on_me
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So the "y" basically sounds like an "e" right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dahlie5
Dahlie5
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It's like the "i" in British English bit or the "y" in German sympatisch.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Urmumgey123

chleb sounds alot like bread.. i find polish to be easy and similar to english (in pernonciation depending on word) like chleb sounds like bread, woda sounds lke water, ect

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theduh
theduh
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Incorrect translation.

It should be "The boys have some bread"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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There is nothing incorrect about, "The boys have bread," and it's a more direct translation as it is. I think that in order to say, "the boys have some bread," you could decline chleb into the genitive case. Chłopcy mają chleba. This should translate more accurately as the latter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
br0d4
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Yes, "Chłopcy mają chleba" would be "The boys have some bread". But it is not a common phrase and most people would not say that with "chleb" in genitive. I am only not sure about some countrymen or elderly people. It is even a bit strange, because "Chłopcy mają chleba" is grammatically correct, but just uncommon. More common would be the exact translation "Chłopcy mają trochę chleba".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Jellei
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I have to say that "Chłopcy mają chleba" sounds simply incorrect to me, but if you say that it's just rare, I believe.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theduh
theduh
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I apologise, i didn't explain properly. I agree with you that there is nothing with with the Polish sentence, but when I saw the sentence say "The boys have bread" in English; I thought that was incorrect because the sentence is missing an article.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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That's fine. You could use the definite article "the" here. "The boys have the bread," but "some" is a noun determiner, not an article

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iprWPq1J

so helpful

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordynChas
JordynChas
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How do i make the t looking thing on a tablet

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim
va-diim
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It's not a T-looking thing. It's an L-looking thing because it's an Ł. You have to add the Polish keyboard. If it's an Android tablet, on Gboard you can add the Polish keyboard by holding down the comma (,) and pressing the Settings icon. Otherwise, you can go into the main Settings app and select "Languages and Input." On an iPad, it's similar to that.

8 months ago