"Ona nosi czapkę."

Translation:She wears a cap.

December 11, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/paladyn.franek

I dont really know why it couldnt be "ona nosi czapki", like for wearing one hat in time, but sometimes changing it to another.

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb

Because both the English and the Polish sentence are about wearing ONE hat. Per se it's not wrong to say she wears hats / ona nosi czapki, but it's just not the correct translation for the sentence above.

December 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/paladyn.franek

OK but i met this sentence without any translation, just to fit the word "czapka". Someone could just be surprized (Ja nie).

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb

I'm not sure whether I understand you...

December 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/paladyn.franek

It doesnt make any sence when you have an exercise to fit only one word, like ive got. Where you dont have original english sentence to compare, only "ona nosi..." And you dont really know wheather she wears hats or a hat.

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb

Nevermind, I just noticed I've been understanding you wrong the whole time. So you got one of the exercises where Duolingo shows ona nosi... and you are supposed to select the correct form from one of the presets, right? If this is the case, then yes, czapki should be an acceptable answer, though it's just not very common to say she wears hats. I don't know whether it's possible to accept multiple possible answers for exercises like that. For the future, it's safer to just stick to the most likely answer. There are always dozens of possible answers on Duolingo and I often find myself in the situation that I type a too complex translation which per se is correct, but just so unusual it wasn't implemented.

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX

Is there a difference between a czapka and a kapelusz?

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
  • 1320

Kapelusz usually has an all-around rim, czapka doesn't. Kapelusz is usually rigid, czapka usually is either flexible or at least fluffy.

Going by the list here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hat#Styles

Kapelusz can refer to bicorne, bowler, derby, sombrero, conical Asian hat, fedora, montera, panama, pillbox hat, top hat, tricorne

Czapka can refer to ascot cap, balmoral bonnet, baseball cap, beanie, bearskin, chullo, cricket cap, coonskin cap, Phrygian cap, rastacap, Santa hat, toque, tuque, ushanka

Czapka may refer, although it's better to you a more precise word, to a beret. (Beret in Polish is beret.)

Neither can refer to custodian helmet, fez, keffiyah, hard hat, kippah, kufi, mitre, pith helmet, turban, zucchetto.

I have to clue how to classify a deerstalker, but I think it's czapka.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb

I was going to explain it myself first, but then I read your comment and I was like: "Nope. Nothing to do here." You nailed it perfectly. Concerning the deerstalker: I'd also say it's a czapka. As a rule of thumb you can say that every hat that is a formal headdress is a kapelusz and everything else a czapka.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kamrelim

Yes, long story short kapelusz=hat, czapka=cap.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DarcX

In my English these two words (when referring to clothes) are the same, lol. I'll keep that in mind, though!

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dont_tread_on_me

czapka is kinda similar to the word "sapka" in Hungarian. I did not even know this word, but guessed right, because its so similar...

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Allamanda2

Or chapeau in French.

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/e28144

Why is it czapkę? Is that the female version? And if so, which is the male and neut.?

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

Polish words have grammatical gender, but they just have it it does not change with a person who is wearing.
And word czapka, like most -a ending words happens to be feminine.

Polish language also has cases, meaning that words(nouns and adjectives) change depending on their function in the sentence, and which preposition or verb they follow.

You need accusative/biernik after nosić, and accusative form of czapka is czapkę.

https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/czapka

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GIJoeski

Rogatywka

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/anele418386

Czapką i czapkę ???? Ka?

August 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 926

"czapka" is the basic, Nominative form.

"czapką" is Instrumental. I wouldn't expect it being used often.

"czapkę" is Accusative. to wear/to be wearing takes Accusative in Polish, to this one will be common.

August 9, 2017
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