"Tomorrow we are going to go to my sister's house."

Translation:Morgen werden wir zum Haus meiner Schwester gehen.

6 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DeeRamm
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Let me try to address the words "nach Hause" which are referred to in several queries and, while I'm at it "zu Hause". I'm pretty sure that they always refer to the home of the subject. If I say "Ich gehe nach Hause" that's going to my home. That can't refer to my sister's house (unless she lives the same place I do - not unusual, but not what seems to be referred to here). If I say "Meine Schwester geht nach Hause." then that's referring to her home.

Similarly, if I say "Ich bin zu Hause." That means I'm in my own home. If Dan is visiting me and sitting next to me, I can't say "Dan ist zu Hause." That would imply he is in his own home, not mine.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WesWalden

Isn't it possible to use the preposition "bei" in this situation to mean "at her house"? And wouldn't it be simpler? "Morgen werden wir bei meiner Schwester gehen"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tupoleva

Gehen ist a verb of motion, it needs a complement of motion towards...so nach Hause

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kasra
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From what I've seen here, "gehen" can be regarded as redundant and dropped in these kinds of sentences; so "Morgen werden wir zum Haus meiner Schwester" should also be correct. Am I right? it was rejected; I reported it; but I want to make sure I understand it correctly.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kwonnnn
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Why is "Morgen gehen wir nach Hause meiner Schwester" an incorrect translation?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

First: 'go to' = 'gehen zu', you're missing the 'zu'. Second: syntax. Toss around some words and get: 'Morgen gehen wir zu meiner Schwester nach Hause' and you get a rather colloquial sentence, in my opinion. It would translate to 'Tomorrow we are going to visit my sister at her home'. I don't like the german translation given by duo here, since it translates to 'Tomorrow we're going to my sister's house, stand around outside and won't even ring the bell'. That might be intentional, but misleading anyway.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrGardner

Why can't I say, "Morgen gehen wir zu meiner Schwester" are they forcing us to use the genitive case here by using "Haus meiner Schwester" "Morgen werden wir zum Haus meiner Schwester gehen" seems klunky to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aldittli

"Morgen gehen wir zum Haus meiner Schwester." is accepted. With the Morgen in the sentence present tense can be used. I think it is more often said this way.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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What decides whether "zu" or "nach" is correct? If I understand what I've been reading elsewhere, one goes "nach London" but "zum Bahnhof," nach Hause but zum somebody else's house. What am I missing?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

Tough one. I've typed an answer but scrapped it. Anyway, I've found this great explanation for you: http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa061900a.htm

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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Thank you. I'll study this for a bit. Perhaps one eventually just internalizes common usage, as one does in one's first language. In the meantime, this explanation might help me sound a little less like Yoda when I speak German.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anca7
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Thanks for the site, it is useful indeed. However, based on its explanations, I would still use "nach" in the sentence above...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EHurtt

Aha! You've discovered one of the great German Learning Headaches(GLH): Depending on the location you can use nach, zu, or in! (Wir gehen ins Kino). I have yet to come across a really clear table detailing where one uses which preposition and have just decided to learn by individual example . . one does end up getting an ear for which sounds 'right'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ohookins

What about this translation (apparently incorrect): "Morgen gehen wir nach meiner Schwesters zu Hause." ?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shardman

I typed "Morgen gehen wir zu meiner Schwester Hause" which was wrong, but why?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fraurickerl

You can also say "zu meiner Schwester" even though it is not counted as correct here. Germans understand the implication of 'my sister's house' when just saying to my sister.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anhayes2

OK, so I thought I had the whole dative/accusative case thing sorted out with respect to prepositional phrases, but apparently not. In this sentence, the dative case is used for "zu dem Haus." However, I thought that you would use the accusative "zu das Haus" here because there is movement/change of state. We are going to the house, we are not in the house. Somebody help, please!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio
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But "zu" is a dative preposition - its object is always dative.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EHurtt

The action/inaction rule only applies to the prepositions that can take EITHER the accusative or the dative. There are some prepositions that always take the accusative, some that always take the dative and then don't forget the few that always take the genitive! (I can only remember anstatt, während and wegen at the moment). Ah, the joys of learning German – it certainly keeps you on your toes :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/F_a_b
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Why fahren cannot be used instead of gehen

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrGardner

"Gehen" implies walking. "Fahren" implies "going" in some sort of vehicle. So if it is farther than you would walk, then you use "fahren". The big joke in Germany is when someone says, "Wir gehen nach Amerika." and people say, "Ziemlich weit zum gehen..." HAHAHAHA!!!! (well... it's not THAT funny, but anyway.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolZaczk

Aw. I like it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kontny

Can I put Morgen just before gehen? If not, why.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrGardner

You CAN put Morgen just before gehen, but then you MUST have a subject. eg. Morgen gehen wir nach Hause. In a statement, the verb MUST come in the second position and the subject must be attached to it. You can begin the sentence with any number of things: Subject, Time expressions, Objects, Adverbs, Locations. This acts to emphasize the first word. The Usual structure however is Subject then Verb then modifiers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kontny

So what is wrong with: "Wir werden zum Haus meiner Schwester morgen gehen." ? I know, it is not as good as proposed construction, but is it wrong in terms of construction?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrGardner

Construction wise, it isn't wrong, but the convention is that you tend to put the time expression earlier in the sentence. The general rule is: Subject, Time expression, Objects, Manner (adverbs), Place. Which spells STOMP. You can put any one of these expressions first, but then the order changes, but keep the rest of the expressions in the original order. For example: P then STOM or O STMP

Remember, Duolingo doesn't have EVERY correct possibility listed. If you think it should be right, let duolingo know.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Houndour
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Can I put 'ins' instead of 'zum'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aldittli

zum= zu dem (dative) meaning "go to the house" ins= in das (accusative) meaning "go into the house" That's not quite the same meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafa_7m
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I typed: Morgen werden wir zu meiner Schwester's Haus gehen.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafa_7m
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I typed: Morgen werden wir zu meiner Schwester's Haus gehen.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrGardner

Schwesters not Schwester's (no apostrophe in German to show possession)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafa_7m
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I mixed the rules , haha I need the German-Spanish much more than it thought

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolZaczk

So. I don't use "werden" here because "Morgen" already places the sentence in the future?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aldittli

Yes, German uses present tense for future events whenever it would be understood.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolZaczk

Thank you. I just started the exercise and everything was "wird" and "werden" until this sentence. I just kept going without thinking!

4 years ago
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