"Pa pa!"

Translation:Bye bye!

December 12, 2015

84 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhuloux

Man, Polish is way cuter than I expected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janoteh

It's so curious :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

I joke with my polish friends about this, "ta ta" in English means goodbye, in polish it means "father" and the polish word for goodbye is "papa" which mean "father" in english ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cours_toujours

Wait... ta ta means goodbye in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBenet

Have you ever seen Tigger from Winnie the Pooh? TTFN, Ta ta for now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

It does, although it's very casual and not usually seen on the internet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

Thanks for spotting the typo. Corrected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidanBehrens

Yeah but you end up sounding pretentious. I'd use bye or good bye. On the internet, bye usually is a safe bet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

It's a brilliant way to say goodbye if you want to mock someone >=)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pia.M.

Love your avatar. It's like a cuter version of the Welsh flag


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

Why thank you! that's just what i intended when I designed it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rdrmb

You have the same languages as me except I'm not doing Welsh :D (I was doing Danish, Italian, and French, but I wanted to focus on Spanish more)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

See, good minds think alike :) I picked Spanish, German, Polish and Welsh as they are good representatives of some of the major sub families of the Indo-european language branch (Latin/ Romance, Germanic, Slavic and Celtc). I do one day want to learn French and Dutch as they are both close to English, but I wanna get the harder languages done first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J0W3x

Papa means "father" in french too ! That's how I'll always remember that expression from now. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toplexil

Yep, I'm French and my brain just went blank when I read "papa". I was like- what does father have to do with all this?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wojo4hitz

In British English, not so much American English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielDabrowski

And pope in Italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ObasiLuchi

Lol. Very funny


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pavelmeshchanov

Not only in English, Ash. Most likely English took it from French (Spanish).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoVilela87

I remember Hannibal Lecter saying "ta ta" in the 2001 movie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dr_Oa

Hungarian also uses it (pápá), now I know where it came from. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmo-pedant

dr Oa: Romanian uses it similarly as "Bye bye", as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4.leaf.clover

Pa pa is potato in South America. xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvesAB

Except in Brazil, which speaks portuguese. Papa means pope, but also could mean a kind of baby food that is made with smashed vegetables. Potato in portuguese is "batata".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xkivix

Well, that's interesting, as in Polish you can also say "papa" about a smashed form of food :) It's very colloquial but still.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I know "papka", but "papa"? I don't see this meaning in the dictionary...

I know it either as a waterproofing material, or as a... childish vulgarism for one's face/mouth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xkivix

Ah, in my family we have always said also "papa" - and "papka" too, but simply as the diminutive of "papa". Idk if it's correct but I know this meaning since always.

Anyway of course I know the rest of the meanings too :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikanokoi

I have a polish friend and she says "papatki" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gumiennik

Cute ^^ - looks like she uses a diminutive there. What she does is very informal, tho.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuratNasyrov

I translated "Father!" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

It sounds like the informal good-bye in Russian, пока (pa-KA)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToraTroll

isn´t it more natural to say only "pa" and not "pa pa" ? From my experience Polish youths does not use a double "pa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gumiennik

If at least one of the people in the conversation is a young child, then both are more likely to say "pa pa." If not - then "pa" is the usual form, yes :).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhuloux

It sounds the same as the difference between "bye" and "bye bye" in English. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToraTroll

Ah alright =) thank you for the reply =D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrzegorzZa35157

Pa pa more use for smal kids


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortispl

And "pa" is rather used by girls. I can't imagine a dude saying "pa" to his male friends.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luismy08

Hahaha, so, how does a man say "bye" to his male friends?, do widzenia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

Maybe with "Na razie!" or something similar, but I could also imagine a single "pa" used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiZPl4y

Depends. "Cześć", "Siema, "Nara", "Na razie". Depends on how close they are, how old they are, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yola448704

Because it is a bit personal and affectionate. But, one day, you might say it to your sister, mother, girlfriend or wife.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HellasCad

Pa is Bye bye in Romanian, so I can see the Slavic connection here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwillanski

I was thinking in Spanish and answered "potato".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBush2

Would not "goodbye" be an acceptable English translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gumiennik

"goodbye" is formal, "pa pa!" is very informal :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rkvance5

I'm excited to hear a real answer, but it seems like there's a big difference in register between "goodbye" and "bye bye". "Goodbye" is formal or neutral, "bye bye" is pretty familiar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gumiennik

yes, you're right - at least from a Polish native speaker perspective ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jXu4p

I have never had any Poles use that term!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It sounds childish (more than 'bye bye'), so will be only used when people are really familiar with each other, and even then there are of course other options.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rimdus
  • 1250

I guess pa pa is (very) informal. Isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yup, totally. Childish, even. Which doesn't change the fact that it can be used by adults, but definitely informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KS-IL

I heard ta ta after several tries not pa pa, and was marked wrong. Who else heard tata?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jobi6

I did. The male voice needs to be updated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

It sounds fine. Note that word-initial plosives are hardly aspirated, unlike in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vInTaGeGaLaXiEn

But sometimes polish people say Czecz for bye..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gumiennik

Cześć, yes, that word is both informal hi and bye. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARiepsaame

I've heard no pa as well. Does that mean the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yola448704

In a sense: Well, it's time to say "goodbye".

No to, pa! - Then/So/Well, bye!/ Bye, then
No to, pa, pa! - Then/So/Well, bye, bye!/ Bye, bye, then!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Shouldn't the comma be after "No"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kittehoftehnight

Could you just say "pa" for "bye?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewGusc

I translated it to 'bye bye' without the exclamation mark and Duolingo said i was wrong?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Must've been a bug, the interpunction is not marked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HiMeCriss

Same in romanian, coincidence or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nik659150

Just like пока пока in russian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gedharrison

Well, I admit I first learnt Polish about a million years ago (well, 35) but I never heard "pa"! Always "do widzenia".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gal_98

In Ukraine we use also "Pa pa" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lani99373

This is a pretty easy one. "Pa pa" is pronounced as it is in English, except that it has a more lifted character.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hun_gary_an

Not gonna lie, that's really similar to Hungarian :D(Pá pá)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yksinaisyys

We use exactly the same thing for "bye bye" in Czech republic, but we use this when we talk with little children, it's one of the first things they can say. I've never heard it among adults, but maybe it's different in Poland


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It sounds rather childish, but I can imagine an adult saying it. Just one "Pa" is a lot more probable for an adult, though.


[deactivated user]

    Oh man, I was thinking "my" was gonna screw me up, but I think this is gonna be harder for me to actually learn.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryCarson15

    It definitely sounded like po pa!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catherine607339

    I neeed to let admin know of the frustration I have been feeling for some time now about the lack of new vocabulary and grammatical constructions in the exercises. Here I am after over 400 days and still being presented with single words and basic greetings. After completing the free course I paid my fee only to find that the content is not any more challenging than what had gone before. Not only do I feel annoyed about the fee, but my time is precious and I feel that I am squandering it on here. Can admin please up the level of difficulty for people who want more challenging material? It is soul destroying to be still learning at a basic level after more than a year of daily conscientious daily practice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    I am a bit confused. The PLUS subscription doesn't let people access some different content, it's not for that. And I don't believe it's advertised differently anywhere. The course that you say you finished... that's it (although we are working on an update, but that's unrelated to any fees anyway). There is no different content for paying users.

    About the basic content... you decide which skills you want to practice (again), there's not much point in practicing the very early ones (and this exercise is super early, sure). If you're using a function that is for 'strengthening your skills in general', perhaps it's not working correctly - but this isn't something that's for discussion here, we just have no knowledge of how this works. This forum is for linguistic things.

    For complaints, I'd suggest this one: https://forum.duolingo.com/topic/1

    For technical issues, it's this one: https://forum.duolingo.com/topic/647


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanFCrespo305

    It means Daddy in Spanish

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