"Pa pa!"

Translation:Bye bye!

December 12, 2015

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zhuloux

Man, Polish is way cuter than I expected.

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Atcovi

xD

December 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Yarabek

yep :)

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Janoteh

It's so curious :D

March 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

I joke with my polish friends about this, "ta ta" in English means goodbye, in polish it means "father" and the polish word for goodbye is "papa" which mean "father" in english ^_^

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Cours_toujours

Wait... ta ta means goodbye in english?

May 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet

Have you ever seen Tigger from Winnie the Pooh? TTFN, Ta ta for now!

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

It does, although it's very casual and not usually seen on the internet.

May 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rimdus

I does?

February 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

Thanks for spotting the typo. Corrected.

February 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AidanBehrens

Yeah but you end up sounding pretentious. I'd use bye or good bye. On the internet, bye usually is a safe bet.

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

It's a brilliant way to say goodbye if you want to mock someone >=)

August 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanesse77

Love your avatar. It's like a cuter version of the Welsh flag

May 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

Why thank you! that's just what i intended when I designed it :)

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rdrmb

You have the same languages as me except I'm not doing Welsh :D (I was doing Danish, Italian, and French, but I wanted to focus on Spanish more)

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

See, good minds think alike :) I picked Spanish, German, Polish and Welsh as they are good representatives of some of the major sub families of the Indo-european language branch (Latin/ Romance, Germanic, Slavic and Celtc). I do one day want to learn French and Dutch as they are both close to English, but I wanna get the harder languages done first.

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/J0W3x

Papa means "father" in french too ! That's how I'll always remember that expression from now. :)

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/toplexil

Yep, I'm French and my brain just went blank when I read "papa". I was like- what does father have to do with all this?!

July 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/wojo4hitz

In British English, not so much American English!

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelmeshchanov

Not only in English, Ash. Most likely English took it from French (Spanish).

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexeyShah

In Russian dad sounds like pápa (1st syllable stressed), whereas Ukrainians mostly call him táto. (Some people actually speak the mixed language so they use papa in Ukrainian, too). Actually knowing those two, I can easily understand simple phrases in Polish. Some words resemble Russian, others sound like Ukrainian, although the phonetics is totally different. What is fun for Polish people it's not easy to understand Russian or Ukrainian , because it's written in Cyrillic script, for it's not a problem, I know both scripts and some more than that))

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/dr_Oa

Hungarian also uses it (pápá), now I know where it came from. :)

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmo-pedant

dr Oa: Romanian uses it similarly as "Bye bye", as well.

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthew_Phelps

aww :)

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/4.leaf.clover

Pa pa is potato in South America. xD

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MuratNasyrov

I translated "Father!" :-)

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzegorzZa35157

Tata.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MuratNasyrov

Thanks. :-)

February 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/nikanokoi

I have a polish friend and she says "papatki" :)

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

Cute ^^ - looks like she uses a diminutive there. What she does is very informal, tho.

January 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It sounds like the informal good-bye in Russian, пока (pa-KA)

March 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ToraTroll

isn´t it more natural to say only "pa" and not "pa pa" ? From my experience Polish youths does not use a double "pa".

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

If at least one of the people in the conversation is a young child, then both are more likely to say "pa pa." If not - then "pa" is the usual form, yes :).

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/zhuloux

It sounds the same as the difference between "bye" and "bye bye" in English. :)

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ToraTroll

Ah alright =) thank you for the reply =D

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GrzegorzZa35157

Pa pa more use for smal kids

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mortispl

And "pa" is rather used by girls. I can't imagine a dude saying "pa" to his male friends.

November 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LuisMiguel207850

Hahaha, so, how does a man say "bye" to his male friends?, do widzenia?

July 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

Maybe with "Na razie!" or something similar, but I could also imagine a single "pa" used.

July 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LuisMiguel207850

Thank you!

July 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DiZPl4y

Depends. "Cześć", "Siema, "Nara", "Na razie". Depends on how close they are, how old they are, etc.

October 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/HellasCad

Pa is Bye bye in Romanian, so I can see the Slavic connection here.

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dwillanski

I was thinking in Spanish and answered "potato".

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBush2

Would not "goodbye" be an acceptable English translation?

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

"goodbye" is formal, "pa pa!" is very informal :)

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rkvance5

I'm excited to hear a real answer, but it seems like there's a big difference in register between "goodbye" and "bye bye". "Goodbye" is formal or neutral, "bye bye" is pretty familiar.

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

yes, you're right - at least from a Polish native speaker perspective ;)

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Puppiz

I cannot do it but now I can

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jXu4p

I have never had any Poles use that term!

August 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

It sounds childish (more than 'bye bye'), so will be only used when people are really familiar with each other, and even then there are of course other options.

August 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/lethal_gnome

Oh man, I was thinking "my" was gonna screw me up, but I think this is gonna be harder for me to actually learn.

January 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Cristi_Here

Same in romanian, coincidence or not?

June 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nik659150

Just like пока пока in russian

June 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vInTaGeGaLaXiEn

But sometimes polish people say Czecz for bye..

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

Cześć, yes, that word is both informal hi and bye. :)

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ARiepsaame

I've heard no pa as well. Does that mean the same?

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

It's „No, pa” and not quite, it would be something like „All right, bye” or „Well, bye then”.
Polish „no” is evil, it has many meanings and is 100% colloquial, so even dictionaries won't help you much – I would say it's even worse than German „Naja”(if by any chance you know what I'm talking about here), as it can work as 'OK', 'yes', 'no', 'I don't know', 'well', 'sure' and a few others too – context and prosody is very important here, so don't expect to fully 'get' „no” until something like C2 level of competence in Polish, I'm afraid. ;)

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

IMO, quite the contrary. It's not absolutely necessary word, but not that hard to understand, actually. No can have some meanings when it's alone, but when coupled with certain words, it's mostly used as an emphasis. You can have normal „pa” (bye), NO with a comma „no, pa” (okay, bye – no is a separate word), but also NO without a comma „no pa” (bye-bye then – no strenghtens the following pa).

There are many words that can be strenghtened with „no”. See the example:
„Nie” – "no (English one)"; „No nie” – "Oh, no, come on"
„Tak” – "yes"; „No tak” – "Oh yes, how I could not think of that"
„I” – "and"; „No i?” – "So (what?)"
„Wiem” – "I know"; „No wiem” – "I know that, I'm not stupid"
And so on :)

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

Yeah, and then you have:
– Kochasz Ewelinę?
– No…

:P

I know what you mean, but consider all the things we use it for, when not used as an intensifier – it can have more meanings than the famous 'k-word' and as to how much it's dependant on prosody, consider that we can't even agree, whether it's the version with comma or not that ARiepsaame heard…

I concede that the use as an intensifier is easy to explain(you just did, in full I think), but I meant the whole total of the meaning(s) of „no”. ;)

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

„No” as independent word? Three meanings come to my mind: "yup", "come on!", and "well…". And I guess also „no, no” (good job).

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Vinyamoiel

Why not only "bye"... ;-;

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kittehoftehnight

Could you just say "pa" for "bye?"

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumiennik

Yes

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kittehoftehnight

thank you

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewGusc

I translated it to 'bye bye' without the exclamation mark and Duolingo said i was wrong?!

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Must've been a bug, the interpunction is not marked.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewGusc

It wont accept it with the exclamation mark either. It won't let me finish this lesson until I get it right :(

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

That is very weird, but I can't do anything about this... I suppose you just have to try it later.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rimdus

I guess pa pa is (very) informal. Isn't it?

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Yup, totally. Childish, even. Which doesn't change the fact that it can be used by adults, but definitely informal.

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AWSMDEWD

Johny Johny?

October 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Gedharrison

Well, I admit I first learnt Polish about a million years ago (well, 35) but I never heard "pa"! Always "do widzenia".

November 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Marijo333

i wrote in letters and it changed to

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Vengir

For some weird reason, Duolingo can't display your entire comment, but I can see it in the e-mail notification.

I believe your phone's keyboard application automatically replaced your words with emojis. I've never seen anything like that, but try to find a way to disable that.

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Marijo333

i have to write without a space, this works: good bye

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexeyShah

I wonder which syllable is stressed,as far as I hear, it seems to me, it's the 1st pápa, whereas sometimes people use it in Ukrainian (pretty much sure it's borrowed) and it sounds like pa pá (2nd stressed). Which is correct, if somebody knows for sure?

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

I'd say that the last syllable is stressed here.

April 7, 2019
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