"Мойбратиграетвфутбольнойкоманде."

Translation:My brother plays on a soccer team.

2 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rwhaller42

Just a note. If the student here is not American (.e.g. British), they would say football, not soccer. As far as I know, the US is the only country in the world that says soccer for the game everyone else calls football. BTW, I believe the expression "American Football" is what the Brits use for what Americans call football.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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You are wrong. "Soccer" is also used in Australia (where "football" means Aussie Rules), and in New Zealand and Japan. "Football" in Australia and NZ also means Rugby League. I am English and I remember that I and everyone else used to call the game "soccer" up until sometime in the eighties. It's a good old English word, invented by members of Football Association themselves in the 1890s. It is, of course, short for "Assoc. Football," which is what they used to print on the posters advertising upcoming matches. For reasons known only to themselves, British football fans saw fit to deprive themselves of their own nickname for the sport, just because the Americans ONLY used "soccer" and refused, quite rightly, to call it "football" since they already had a sport called that, thank you very much! This action by British soccer fans is what we used to call "cutting your nose off to spite your face."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nDroae

A note for American football fans wondering what it's called in Russian: it's Американский футбол. https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%90%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9_%D1%84%D1%83%D1%82%D0%B1%D0%BE%D0%BB

And a tangential surprising fact: "Seven out of the eight Australian states and territories run [American football] leagues; a total of 70 teams consisting of approximately 3000 players." http://gridironaustralia.org.au/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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It doesn't surprise me! American football at the amateur or semi-pro level is popular in many countries around the globe.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/richard547513
richard547513
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That's quite an eye-opener for me. I didn't realise that the English used to call it soccer back then. Thanks for the post

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aam.

In Quebec, we say ''soccer'' too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/killerbng
killerbngPlus
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"As far as I know, the US is the only country in the world that says soccer " Not that it is normal for all, but on both British and Australian shows, they do say Soccer from time to time. I believe I have also seen a show in New Zealand where they called it soccer as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheFinkie

Yes, we call it soccer in New Zealand, but football is used occasionally, too.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeanmenezesjjk

In portuguese we also call it 'american football"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski
serbioski
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The word "soccer" is a bit offensive, specially when you are from Argentina.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fr224
fr224
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How?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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"As far as I know"! Yes, well, you don't know very much, do you? "Soccer" is also used in Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, among others. It is also used by me, and I am English. We ALL used "soccer" (a word invented by Englishmen in the 1890s - short for "Association" - and used by ALL classes of people) to refer to Association Football up until the 1980s or thereabouts, or had you forgotten? And some of us still do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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In the Russian sentence, how am I supposed to know that the word команде is a noun and not an adjective?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
Mod
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No full-form adjective looks like that (check the endings ). Basically, all Russian adjectival endings are at least two letters long and always start with a vowel.

The major exception is how "animal-possessives" and the word for "third" behave. They have a /j/-sound after a soft consonant almost everywhere in their endings: третий→третья,третье, третьи, третьего, третью... Normal adjectives have two vowels instead of ь + vowel and just -его, -им instead of -ьего, -ьим.

Anyway... to have a neuter SHORT-form adjective as a predicate here, you would have to actually have the predicate consist of "to be" with an adjective. In reality, "plays" is the verb that acts as a predicate in the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewishPolyglot
JewishPolyglot
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Спасибо!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave168907

The fact that he "plays" indicates that he is part of the team on the field and not just on the staff.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave168907

Therefore it makes no difference whether you use "in", "on" or "for".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hexapyro
hexapyro
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What's the difference here between "for a [soccer team]" and "on a [soccer team]"? The first option makes more sense to me in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
Jenz114
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"For" only implies that you're playing something (could be soccer, but not necessarily) to the benefit of the soccer team, whereas "on" would not leave any doubt about the fact you are indeed one of the team's participating players.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john.newbe
john.newbe
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In a team sounds even stronger

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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To me (non-native, but UK educated), "on a team" sounds more American and "in a team" sounds more British.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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As a native British English speaker, I can confirm that for a team is the most usual form. For example, a news report may announce that "Dier is playing for Spurs now". However all three usages are possible.
in a team is more usual when solo competing ight be possible (for example in gymnastics, which is both a solo and a team event). For a team sport, it sounds slightly odd to me - a slight reaction of 'well, how else do you play football?!'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petrenko
petrenko
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to say someone plays for a team simply means they are a team member - it doesn't suggest anything about the nature of the relationship, to whose benefit it is etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nihaoearth12

What type of adjective is the word soccer here? How does the adjective change when the noun is in prepositional?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
keinemeinung
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It's a regular adjective with a regular adjectival ending. Lots of nouns in Russian become adjectives by adding -ский, -ний, etc. The adjective is in prepositional case with a feminine ending to match the case and gender of the noun (команда) it is describing.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
oulenz
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Squad?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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Looking at the Russian Euro 2016 website, I got the impression that
команда = team &
Состав = squad.

Could any native Russian speakers confirm this please?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci
Gwenci
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Команда = team; состав is the players who are in the team. One could speak of "состав команды" (apparently "squad of the team" is also possible?).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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When it comes to international competition, there is a pool of players who are selected to represent their country in the competition. This is that country's squad. From the squad, a team is picked seperately for each match of that tournament.
Is that the same distinction as in Russian?
I have never heard "squad of the team" - I suppose, either one is interested in the sport enough to know the difference, or one doesn't care about the topic enough to want it explained!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci
Gwenci
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Your description suggests that a squad is a different thing after all. Состав is just all the players who are in any team. Other meanings of it include "composition" and "compound", if that helps (link), and also "ingredients" as written on food packages.

I wrote "squad of the team" because I had googled it and got quite a few results, and it appears that the use of "squad" in many of them matches that of "состав" (sort of "composition of the team").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
daughterofAlbion
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Have followed the google links and worked out what is happening. Strictly speaking, Manchester United is a football club. However, a lot of the supporters of this (or any other football club) will refer to supporting Manchester United as "following their team".
It is in that, looser, sense of the word team that the phrase "squad of the team" makes sense. It is the total pool of players on the payroll of that club (or "team"); not the list of players fielded by the club in a particular match.

As an example, for Euro 2016, the England squad comprises 23 players. (link). Only 11 will play in a team (plus substitutes).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci
Gwenci
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Hmm... Now I’m not even sure that a term analogous to "squad" even exists. There is "сборная [команда]" for a country’s team playing at international matches and comprising players from different clubs (dictionaries translate it as "national team"), but I have no idea if "сборная Англии" can refer to all those 23 players, or only 11, or both. Never been a football fan. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh
Quieh
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My brother plays soccer in a team. This sentence is different in Russian? Or should it be accepted too?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
keinemeinung
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Well, "My brother plays soccer in a team" in English sounds like there's a version of soccer where people play solo. The Russian for that would be something like "Мой брат играет в футбол с командой" which would express that he plays with a team in soccer as opposed to by himself, but it looks strange to me in both languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deny892533

Solution would be for duolingo to respect the country of the person learning

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoramZamir

My brother is play in a soccer team

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuliyaKitcune

why "is"? if he is playing just now so ...is playing... otherwise ...brother plays....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheFinkie

Not being a fan of any kind of sport, I must ask: can you play IN a soccer team, or is this bad grammar?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K0v_
K0v_
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Why not ''futbolnaya komande''?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
keinemeinung
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Because adjectives, just like nouns, also decline based on gender, number and case. futbolnaya (футбольная) is the feminine [gender], singular [number] nominative [case] version of the adjective, but in prepositional case (and dative and genitive cases), the feminine singular ending of adjectives is -ой/-ей.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lebrazil2008

When I was learning turkish in Duolingo, always there was someone explaining the endings... The comments in the russian section are bizarre and useless.... If someone could explain the endings and cases in every section would be very useful

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deny892533

Btw the other countries that call it 'soccer' are not really big footballing nations and are just following America

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deny892533

Soccer is american for gods sake. The rest of the world knows it as football!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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You know nothing. How old are you? I'm 67 and I remember myself and EVERYONE else in England calling the game "soccer" (as well as "football" of course) in the 1950s and 1960s. The word "soccer" (short for Assoc., as in Association Football - the sports's official name) is a good old English word invented by top officials of the Football Association in the 1890s, soon after the sport got going. It was used by ALL classes of English people until sometime in the 1980s, when the football-fan morons of England decided that they were going to cut off their noses to spite their faces! They stopped using THEIR OWN WORD just because the Americans (quite rightly) ONLY called it "soccer," and refused to use "football" because they already had a sport called that. I'll remind you that rugby is officially "Rugby Football," and that there is also Gaelic Football and Australian Rules Football, all of which - being equally descendants of the old county footballing codes along with American Football - have equal right to use the name "football." "Soccer" is used not only in the USA, but also in Australia, New Zealand, Japan and several other countries.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh
Quieh
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What a waste of time... This discussion leads to nothing. England nowadays call it football and soccer. Us calls it soccer. Aussies and kiwis call it soccer / football / whatever. The rest of the world can call it the way they want. Just Duolingo should accept both words and that would be the end of it.

Instead of learning Russian we are here discussing nonsense and minor details. Just my opinion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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True, but what harm is it doing? We are just having an interesting discussion among ourselves. No-one is forcing you to read it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh
Quieh
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Actually it was sending emails to me as I was following this discussion due to a question I posed early. Since it turned into a ego fight I'd rather unfollow it. So, my opinion on the subject as a waste of time continues and I am leaving this "chat". If you want to keep talking feel free to do so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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Fine, but before you go, there's just one thing. There is no ego fight. There is an argument about facts. The other person made an incorrect statement and I corrected him. He's one of millions who labour under the same misapprehension. Such urban myths annoy me, and I try to correct them when I come across them. That's all.

2 years ago
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