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"Debo ir a ese monte."

Translation:I must go to that mount.

5 years ago

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

One minute it says monte is scrubland and the next it doesn't... "I must go to the scrubland is wrong" But el monte = scrubland ??????

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewandrew599

I don't even know what scrubland means, but I put that as well because it made more sense than "mount" as a noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyCoogan1

There is a St Michael's Mount in Cornwall in England. It becomes an island at high tide but you can walk to it at low tide. Its a bit specialist and Not really in common useage

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In the dictionary, it says that "mount" is archaic for mountain or hill, except for in specific names such as the one you mentioned.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TangSooKnott

Mount Rushmore.... Mount of Olives, ... Mount St. Helens

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChefeBispo
ChefeBispo
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Each of which would normally be called a mountain, not a mount.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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Just curious, seeing you're up to a 695 days streak. I'd be there except for 2 days I've missed in the past two years. But what do you DO with them. Do they just pile up? Don't you think DL would do well to sell raffle tickets for travel ads on their site. Like 10 lingots gets you a chance at a trip to Berlin, all expenses paid? Language studiers are a great set of eyes/minds to advertise to, and we'd love the travel, and DL could make some money for its project! But like how many lingots do you have saved up? I have more than `1000 and all I ever do is buy a double or nothing with them (which is not by the way a real double or nothing because they take away five of the ten they give you which is not how a double or nothing works.) But how many do you have saved up?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

Hi I also missed a day otherwise I would have about a hundred more, I am sure there are many like this. I have 2749 at the moment. Like you I can't use them for anything. If I could I would like to buy lessons from someone who is a native of Spain. As I have finished the tree and they have changed how the points work I am losing motivation to continue, I need new lessons.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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My sympathies. My that's a lot of lingots. I believe the site started as a way to get people translating the iinternet and that's a good way to motivate, a whole other community of translators on here. So you could try that. I've been translating an article for months and meet others working on the same one. That's the immersion tab, hundreds of subjects to choose from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

Hi BLPK I use the immersion tab now and then, perhaps I need to use it more. Thanks for the advice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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Hi Lesorton I also have more lingots than I can use. I find the points somewhat motivating, but moreso when I do the immersion. The immersion has been downright interesting - I've learned a bit of history, and about some Hispanic authors.

I have noticed that when I redo the harder lessons at the bottom of the tree, new vocabulary shows up.

In the meantime, it recently occurred to me to sign up as a Spanish speaker and do the English tree. I've also been working on German, and when that tree is complete, I'll sign up as a Spanish or German speaker and do the other tree.

Of course there are other free outside sources that you may have found. My two favorites are Study Spanish ( http://www.studyspanish.com/help/intermediate.htm ) - don't bother with buying their proprietary course, the free part is just fine - and and About Spanish ( http://spanish.about.com/ ) You also might find Loyal Books ( http://www.loyalbooks.com/language/Spanish ] of interest, and not just for Spanish.

I hope you find your enthusiasm again!

Cheers!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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Hi, like Eloise, I just finished the English course as a native speaker of Spanish (which I definitely am not). It helped in so many ways but the most significant one was reading and participating in the discussion. It was just like this one, ie, no one ever says this and/or why don't they allow this synonym and/or I've never heard this in my life. It was like I took a completely different course by spending most of my time reading native speakers debate, comment, etc. Don't know how this works but I never lost my streak or my lingots but the current course history does not show up on my achievements when I start as a native Spanish speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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For lafe55 - thanks for the encouragement!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camry77022

You have a good idea that would be geeat for both DL and the the students of DL. Maybe it will catch their eye and it work out for both. Now on another note. Double or nothing works like this-if you have a $1 and I have a $1. We make a bet for a $1 double or nothing. I win the bet. You now have nothing $0 and I now have $2. That's how it works.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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According to wordreference, monte is hill, vegetation, or forest. Mount is archaic in English and not used very often except to refer to specific places such as Mount Shasta, Mount Tam, Mount Hamilton and so on. We speaking in general, we say either hill or mountain. Mountain wasn't accepted, but I think it should be and will report it (April 2018). However, "I must go to that hill" is accepted.

They say that scrubland = matorral which also means brush, brushwood, or scrub. I don't know about the rest of you, but I've never had a burning desire to go see some brush or scrub. On the other hand, a hill, mountain, or forest would be worth going to see.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

EXACTLY my thoughts. DUO please, please be consistent Scrubland makes sense here. WE KNOW that because you taught us the meaning of the word. Mount does not make sense here -- unless you are talking about a horse or a computer storage device.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adcook
adcook
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What does this mean?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Mount is likely short for mountain and I guess it is a conversation about a specific mountain. Maybe by snowboarders/skiers/mountain climbers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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"Mount" is NEVER used this way in English. Yes there's Mount Everest, but it's always a "mountain" away from its name.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodiBeth

Mount is more of a poetic or old-fashioned use here. You wouldn't hear someone in normal convo saying this unless they were maybe quoting scripture or speaking in a poetic way. Useful to know that mountain/montaña can be shortened in Esp. though!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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In that case the only thing that seems to both agree with the Spanish "monte" and the English "mount" would be a large hill.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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can you give an example familiar in the US? like the hills of San Francisco, would they be called les monts? or the "heartbreak hill" of the Boston marathon? or... ? This is my continual point about how useful context would be for these "sentences", which are not always of course even sentences.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I guess you mean an example of a famous "hill" with "mount" in its proper name to show that someone is calling a "hill" a "mount" in US? No I do not know of any. It could be as rare in actual usage as calling a "mountain" a "mount". In that case I think maybe the English translation should be "mountain" for "monte"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
BLPK
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all I meant is an example of something we in the US would know that is called "mont" in French.

(Not something with Mount in its proper name, which is where the confusion lies in the lesson.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IbexMark

The only time you hear that in English is in reference to Mount of Olives which is in Israel. It seems to be a hold over from archaic English used in the King James bible.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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The only one I can think of in the USA is Mount Vernon - George Washington's house, which is at an altitude of 79 feet.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonBro9

In English, mount is used before a named mountain and capitalized as part of the proper name; Example: Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Tabor. It is commonly abbreviated to Mt. (Mt. Hood) We would say either : "I must go to Mt. Hood" or "I must go to that mountain".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeeAnn

It won't accept "I should go to that mount." But it lists "should" in the translations list.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
truelefty
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Actually should is "debería", I should go is "debería ir".

"Debo ir" is translated as "I must go"
"Necesito ir" is "I need to go"
"Debería ir" is "I should go"
"Tendría que ir" is "I should have to go"

And the one that many people misunderstand, the use of the verb "deber" as "to owe":
That's "Te debo 10 dólares", "I owe you 10 dollars",
but not "Te debo dar 10 dólares", which is "I must give you 10 dollars."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yetanothername

That's nice and all, but they neither explain that, nor are they consistent.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OjosDelMundo

Accepts "I should go to that mountain." as of 8/14/14.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yetanothername

And it doesn't accept it in 2018. Duolingo SHOULD fix this.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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That's interesting because they don't accept "I must go to that mountain."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

And all the drop down clues were for verbs, not nouns!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rondinella01

I should is conditional. I must is the present.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daemok
daemok
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But... deber is "to owe". In English, saying "I ought to run" means exactly the same thing as "I should run".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Like many words, deber has multiple meanings. "Should, must, and ought" should all be accepted.

"The verb deber and the verb phrase tener que are the two most common ways of expressing obligation in Spanish, to say that someone has to, should, ought or must do something."

"A weaker sense of obligation can be expressed by using the conditional form of deber. The conditional forms of deber are especially common in questions."

https://www.thoughtco.com/expressing-obligation-spanish-3079893

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

"I must" is both present and future.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gosuka
Gosuka
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Mount as a noun in English refers to something to ride (horse/bike/husband) or an area to put something on another object (tripod mount/trophy mount etc.) Otherwise it's a verb as in "to get up and onto" (horse/bike/husband)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Sometimes it is. St Michael's Mount, for instance. Or in biblical tellings perhaps. But normally we would use mountain. And the phrase 'I must go to that mount' just sounds plain weird!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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I thought the sentence meant "I must go to a different horse" or as you suggest "I must go to a different mount (for my statue, my camera, etc.). But the use of "go to" in these sentences does not seem like good English to me. I didn't even think of "mountain" as a possibility until I read this discussion. But then I'm in the US. Maybe in Australia or England they refer to the mountain as the mount.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anniewicker

in my understanding, Spanish has only one word (deber) for should, ought to and must.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

It uses different conjugations for different levels of intensity IIRC. Must also overlaps some with "have to" or "tener+que+[infinitive]." I'm having a lot of trouble with it myself though, so I might not be the best for explaining this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Somewhat odd English. I could be a horse or a mountain that I must go to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlpresn

Why doesn't "I must go to that hill" work? Before, I was marked correct when I translated "el monte" as "the hill".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hunter18288

That should be accepted. "Hill" is actually probably the best definition, as I believe monte basically means little mountain.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebaslunaa

I think it's the inverse, I think "Hill" is like "Colina" (a little mountain). Mount is used with big mountains like "Mount Everest" for example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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It is accepting "hill" as a translation now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JAMESTOMLI2

"mount " is never used like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amaizquierdo
Amaizquierdo
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Why use "deber" instead of "tener que?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Should, ought, must (conditional) vs have to (present)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

It gives a translation as 'scrubland' only 2 mins ago and now won't except the same answer. Sheesh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

?Por que, un sacrificio?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edhausman

I say that all the time. Now I must go to that mount.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scarolan108

Mount is never used this way in modern English. Maybe 100 years ago you might refer to your horse as a "mount". Duo, please change it to mountain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHalat

colina - monte - montaña. En español hay tres niveles; Hay en inglês uno que venga entre hill y montain?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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No que yo sepa. "Mount" se utiliza a menudo en los nombres de las grandes colinas. Piense en "Mount of Olives". Sin embargo, el tamaño medio no tiene un nombre particular en ingles. "Foothills" refieren a un lugar por colinas grandes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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Mucha gracias. Nos ayuda a entender. Sí, en ingles hay las dos palabras y nada más para describir este concepto. Por eso, tenemos esta confusión. ¿Nos prestan su palabra? La necessitamos. Jajaja

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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"I should go to that hill" was not accepted. Must be a strong flavor of deber.

(later) oops. I guess should would be "Debo de ir".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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I put in the same answer and it was accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divaluisa
divaluisa
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"go to that mount"???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EaterofPumkin
EaterofPumkin
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Mount as in horse?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacque543059

Yes, my first thought was of choosing which horse to ride.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

This is mount as in Mount Everest. It's actually synonymous with mountain in that sense. "monte" has other meanings beyond mountain, however, which is why Duo doesn't just use montaña instead.

It's good for native English speakers to know that native Spanish speakers use monte and montaña, even if mount rarely appears in English.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alethea436961

I THOUGHT Debo ir . was I SHOULD go and Tengo que was I MUST go or I have to go. Very different motivations -- in English anyway. Also agree with the discussion on mount, Duo, Please rethink this sentence.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Deber has several shades of meaning, one of which is "must" when used with an infinitive. The Spanish verb seems to have a strong suggestion of social or moral obligation, while tener que does not. You are quite right that debo ir could mean "should go."

Without any context, it's not clear why Duo chose this particular sentence to include deber. Perhaps, this is something Moses said. Otherwise, it could just as easily have been tener que. Because there is so much overlap in meaning, usage of the corresponding English verbs is less helpful than understanding the subtleties associated with the Spanish.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

Thanks !

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarrenEsch
WarrenEsch
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'Mount' as in hill or horse?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
Eloise23
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11 January 2018 - As a noun, it refers to elevated land, as in hill or mountain, or to undeveloped land, as in countryside, scrubland, woodland or bush.

More here: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/el%20monte

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RileyIngle

Nobody says "mount" in American English

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrystalDove
KrystalDove
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How do you know when "deber" means should or must and which one Duolingo will accept as correct for that sentence?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I can't speak for Duo (though I have been accused of that), but deber can mean "should" or "must" when used in the present indicative. In part, the confusion comes from English usage of should, ought to and must. We often use them interchangeably, with possibly subtle shifts in emphasis. Some argue that "must" is stronger than "should" and I would tend to agree. Nevertheless, debo can mean "I ought to," "I must," or "I should."

When you are expressing a conditional obligation, "should" is generally preferred and in Spanish that corresponds to debería. For this reason, you will see people suggest that debería means "should" and debo means "must." I find that a useful, if a bit too simplistic, distinction and it may match the way Duo uses deber most of the time.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScotRobert1

Monte,...... Mountain.....

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne926934

not natural English English to use mount

2 weeks ago