"You wear shirts."

Translation:Nosisz koszule.

December 12, 2015

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjb518

I wrote "Nosisz koszulę", but another correct solution was listed as "Nosicie koszule". I get the difference in the verb - I said you wear (singular), and the other is you wear (plural) - but why is there a difference in koszule? Did I make a mistake which was accepted, or are either correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matt.elsewhere

I think it's because "koszule" is plural accusative (shirts), while "koszulę" is singular accusative (shirt).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_tv80

But it is plural in English sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irnerne

from my experience with Polish course, Duolingo sometimes (or all times?) allows to use regular characters instead of special ones, same as it doesn't check commas etc. This wasn't the case for German though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larkspire

I think it was in Turkish where someone noticed that Duo can't tell the difference between un-accented letters and certain accented ones - wonder if it's the same here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Appoxo

Probably because saying things like "BrieftrÄger" sounds very different that "BrieftrAger". Dunno about things that contain accents but Umlaute are completely different letters in Germany.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Same goes for the special characters in Polish. But what can we do, a lot of people 'don't have them on their keyboard'...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vandebroin

why koszuli is wrong? can someone explain it to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

That's the genitive singular. But the verb nosić requires the accusative, and we also need the plural form here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfwgator

I assume that if this sentence takes the form of the Accusative case, what determines the female plural? Does it depend on the word, because in most cases of the Accusative Case, the female plural noun ends in -y and not -e.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Basementality

It generally depends on whether the ending of the noun stem is hard or soft. The "l" in koszula (koszul-) is soft so it becomes koszule in plural accusative. A noun like kobieta (kobiet-), however, ends with a hard consonant "t" and becomes kobiety in plural accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexeyPshek

WHY "-e" AT THE END INSTED OF "-ę"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Because here, you have plural shirts (You generally like to wear shirts, different shirts), not one shirt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexeyPshek

thanks a lot for your soonest reply. actualy i have already guessed it but anyways thanks again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard.birks

Question: how do you tell the difference (between Koszule and Koszulę in the accusative) when listening?

Would it be a context thing ?

Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I guess the safest way to make sure you men "koszulę" is to make it something like "only one shirt" - "Nosisz tylko jedną koszulę".

If you hear the Duolingo sentence, I guess the difference may be undistinguishable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adrian260219

if shirts are plural shouldn't it be koszulki?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

The plural of koszulka (T-shirt) is koszulki and the plural of koszula (shirt with buttons) is koszule. Both are accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lt_Serebryakov

Nosisz bluzki? Since bluzka is a blouse? Or are blouses not considered the same as shirts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thinkname

It's giving me the correct answer as koszulki. Why? How did the second k get there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

A buttoned shirt is "koszula". A t-shirt, which is commonly referred to as just "shirt", is "koszulka". Or we can use "t-shirt" in Polish as well.

It's surprising that you got "koszulki" as a correction, as it is just an accepted answer, not one of the 'best' ones...

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