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https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller

"Aluno" or "Estudante"? - Know the difference

Danmoller
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These two words might seem the same, but they are used in different ways:

Estudante

"Estudante" is someone who studies. Normally as compared to other professions.

So, everyone in school or college, for instance, is an "estudante".

Easy, right?

Aluno

Now, this is more than just being a student.
One that is an "aluno" is always linked to one that teaches.

So, there are "aluno de um professor" and "aluno de uma escola" (A student under a teacher and a student in a school)


Saying "meu aluno" (my student) is fine. But saying "meu estudante" is weird (Somehow it sounds like "my person that studies").

Saying "eu sou aluno" is ok if the school/college/teacher is implied, but would be just as weird if used as an answer to "what do you do? / what's your profession?"


There might be regional differences, as pointed out by some users below :)


Back to the Portuguese Help Index: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6331998

2 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MarryGabriele

I'm from Brasil,dont worry about it, it's the same thing ever. People wont mind if you speak you are an "aluno" or "estudante" and they dont even know the historical meaning of this word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danieltheodoro84

I think Danmoller explained it correctly.

You say "estudante" or "eu estudo" when you are talking about yourself: "ainda sou estudante", "eu estudo na universidade X", "eu estudo medicina".

The educational institution (including teachers) will call the students "alunos" most of the time: "os alunos que perderam a última aula deverão repô-la", "há doze alunos nessa turma", "gosto dos meus alunos".

People can call you "estudante" if they want to talk about you, or "aluno" if they want to talk about the institution: "ele é estudante de economia", "ele é aluno da universidade X".

Saying "eu sou aluno de economia" is not weird, but I guess people use "eu sou estudante" more. If the institution calls students "estudantes" instead of "alunos", as in "os estudantes que perderam a última aula...", I don't think it will be weird also, but they use "alunos" more. It IS weird to say "meu estudante", because it sounds like you are dating the student. People always say "meu aluno".

I am Brazilian, and I don't think there is any regional difference (since it is really not incorrect to use either, unless you want to say "meu estudante" -- which I am certain is weird anywhere in Brazil).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fhfata

Hey guys! My name is Fernando, I born and live in Brazil.

The problem is the ambiguity comon in these two languages!

I think that the better to explain these words is by using the portuguese dictionary.


Translated from the Portuguese Dictionary:


ALUNO - masculine noun

Who was raised and educated by someone; who had or have someone by teacher or tutor;


ESTUDANTE - adjective and noun two genres

Who regularly attends the course of an institution or any other free course in which one can acquire some skill and / or knowledge.


Hi, danmoller, could you add the dictionary translation as a complement to clarify these two words?

Hope that I have been a small help.

Thank you, Bye :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rosa40631

obrigada, essa ajudado muito com me compreensão a diferente entre essas palavras.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyglotCiro
PolyglotCiro
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This is very similar to Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Indeed.

A Brazilian can understand Spanish to a certain degree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyglotCiro
PolyglotCiro
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What about listening?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Listening too, although the opposite is not true.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianna.z

for me spoken Br-Pt is far more similar to Spanish than to Pt-Pt

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
Danmoller
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Pt-Pt is too fast and seems to hide more sounds in speeches, vowels are shorter either (my personal impression). I can't understand it quite well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianna.z

exactly! when I first came to Portugal I couldn't even separate the words when someone was speaking to me, everything was so fast and unclear that I had to ask everyone to repeat themselves :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john.alan.c

Yes, and, going the other way, it's usually harder for Spanish speakers to understand Portuguese speakers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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I am from Northeastern Brazil and in fact there are some people who prefer to be called "estudante", because "aluno" comes from Latin "alumnus", which means "no light" or "without illumination", like they have no knowledge about anything, or something like that :P. I am in High School (ensino médio) , and my class colleagues often feel offended about this...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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Actually, this is a very common misconception. The "a" prefix in aluno doesn't describe lack of something, but an ongoing process. So "alumnus" is not the one without the light, but the one receiving the light.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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It makes sense... I can see now that my colleagues confused the Greek a- prefix, which indicates negation, with the Latin one. I never noticed it... Thank You!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Or maybe it even has nothing to do with light and is related to a word for "nourish": etymonline thinks so

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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Yes, and I think the act of receiving light could be a form of knowledge nourishing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera
Scutigera
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Just to add to the discussion, there are similar words in English (albeit from Latin) but since they are not often used, there is confusion as to what they mean (especially since, in this case the singular is the one with the "s" ending):

a·lum·nus (əˈləmnəs/) noun; plural noun: alumni

a graduate or former student, of a particular school, college, or university.

"a Harvard alumnus"

a former member of a group, company, or organization.

"a Royal Ballet alumnus"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Milton586049

I'm satisfied with this answer. I can't imagine anything else needed to be said. So anyone dedicated to study, attends school, college or university, or even someone (like us) who takes SELF-STUDY seriously can be called a STUDENT. Whereas, those students who are in some (formal or informal) relationship with a teacher, a tutor or a school can be called PUPILS (paricularly by their teachers, tutors or schools).

Insidentally, some pupils simply have no choice about being students. (Parents can assign them to a tutor until they acquire the skills, the knowlege and the discipline; or until they are of age. FOR EXAMPLE:

NOW WHAT I mean is that as long as the inheritor (heir) is a child and under age, he does not differ from a slave, although he is the master of all the estate; But he is under guardians and administrators or trustees until the date fixed by his father. Galatians 4:1‭-‬2 AMPC http://bible.com/8/gal.4.1-2.AMPC

Consequently, a pupil may study begrudgingly or not at all... Whereas, those who are students by choice, (irrespective of their performance) tend to be more serious with their studies either out of love or necesity. That is, they may have a goal to attain (such as a diploma). In other words, NO DIPLOMA, NO EMPLOYMENT, NO DECENT JOB...

In our case, (IF WE FORFEIT OUR GOAL) it may mean: NO LANGUAGE SKILLS, NO TRAVEL, NO COMUNICATION WITH THE NATIVES... or the beautiful people of other lands.

ESTUDANTE = STUDENT ALUNO = PUPIL

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyglotCiro
PolyglotCiro
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Oh! When I readed the title of you post, I did think you had a typo(aluno:alumno) because I did think it were in Spanish, sorry!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenemm
greenemm
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So would I be right in suggesting that Estudante roughly translates to Student, whereas Aluno roughly translates to a Studier (or the act of studying) and if used in these contexts you wouldn't go far wrong? eg 'Meu estudante' = My student, whereas 'Meu Aluno' = My studier, doesn't fit quite right unless it is qualified in some other way ie meu aluno do universo = my studier of the universe?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fhfata

We can simply put your "roughly" in this sentence:

O brasil tem milhões de alunos e pouquíssimos estudantes

The translation to english with the context:

The Brazil has millions of students (who attends a course) and very few students (who really is applied to the studies)


It means that you can have someone to teach you (BE ALUNO/STUDENT OF A TEACHER), but doesn't means you are really listening to your teacher (BEING A GOOD ESTUDANTE/STUDENT).


IN A FEW WORDS, THE MEANING OF:

ALUNO could be the same as PUPIL or APRENTICE of an INSTITUTION or PARTICULAR PERSON

and

ESTUDANTE could be the same as ESTUDENT who that STUDIES


I hope this answer had have been some help :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdevi1991
jdevi1991
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Em minha experiência vi que no dia a dia não tem diferença más tecnicamente tudo que você falou é verdade, especialmente na parte de um professor falando meu aluno, não meu estudante.

1 year ago