"Mam kanapkę i owoce."

Translation:I have a sandwich and fruit.

December 13, 2015

25 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericraff

Why is owoce not translated as "a fruit" rather than fruit? How can we tell if we should put the article in there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viersch
  • a fruit is owoc (singular)
  • fruit is owoce (plural)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericraff

I must have missed that, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leax7

You're not the only one ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nepenti

Oh, all this time I thought "owoce" was a collective noun!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helcia3

Then how come fruit doesn't have an «s» if it's plurial?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Good question, but I'm afraid that's just one of the strange things about English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick283819

Sometimes it does in English, but it's not common. Fruits of labor is an example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobioJi

Why is it kanapkę but not owocę?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

different words ave different case endings.

Kanapka is feminine and singular - it has -ę as accusative ending. Owoc is singular masculine , in plural owoce is not masculine personal. It has accusative=nominative owoce.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel873062

Can someone please explain why this is an accusative case? Nothing is "being done" to the nouns. I agree they are not the subject of the sentence, so I understand this is not a nominative sentence, but I do not see why it should be accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yola448704

It is the verb, which dictates the case of the following noun. Many (not all... )
very common verbs, like "mieć", "widzieć", "jeść", "lubić", "kochać", go with the accusative. What is "done" to the noun here is that you "have it". It is a good idea to practice any new verb together with the noun in its respective case:

to have (who(m)? what? - Accusative) - mieć (kogo? co? - Biernik)

I have (what?) a sandwich/sandwiches - Mam (kogo? co?) kanapkę/kanapki
I can see (what?) a house/houses - Widzę (kogo? co?) dom/domy
I eat (what?) an apple/apples - Jem (kogo? co?) jabłko/jabłka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alice838021

Why it's wrong : I have a sandwich and A fruit.? Why it's suppose to be: I have A sandwich and THE fruit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idanlipin

Owoce is the plural of owoc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yola448704

Just like Polish noun "drzwi" indicates singular "one door" or plural "doors", English nouns, like "fruit", or "fish" indicate "owoc", "ryba", lub "owoce", "ryby".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyKreuch

Can it be translated as " I have A sandwich and SOME fruit"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

A sandwich - sure, but about 'some', we rather keep close to what exactly was written, and "some fruit" would equal "trochę owoców".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

I know that 'some' has a variety of functions in English - or, to put it another way, a variety of translations into Polish - but as a native speaker of English I can tell you that

"I have a sandwich and fruit" "I have a sandwich and some fruit"

... mean exactly the same thing. There's not reason to not allow what TonyKreuch suggests.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Sometime after I wrote that answer, we started to be a bit more lenient with "some". If it generally works in English in a given sentence, it can be accepted. And actually now I see that it already works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

Excellent. It's a tough one, because you could probably find example of English sentences where adding a 'some' changes the meaning somewhat, but then there are lots of cases where it makes zero difference. At the same time this is only a side issue to teaching Polish... so a hard balance to keep.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steampunkgiraffe

is "owoce" also supposed to be in the accusative form like kanapkę?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yes. For: 'not masculine-personal' plural (which is here), neuter singular and masculine inanimate singular, the Accusative form looks identical to Nominative.

So "Mam owoce" = I have fruit(s), "Mam owoc" = I have a fruit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sita41874

i have to type in polish what i hear, that is what i did. still incorrect answer because it says i typed in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

We've had some similar reports, however we really need screenshot as proof...

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