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https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

Danish dialects, with audio samples

If you want to learn more about the danish dialects, how they differ in pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary, you can get a lot of information from the university of Copenhagen and their site dedicated to the topic on http://dialekt.ku.dk/ -- the site is in Danish with no English translation that I know of.

I haven't checked out everything; mainly the region I'm from. The thing's I've looked at are fairly accurate, with a few things I don't recognize for my own region. I do come from an area that borders two regions that differ a bit on a lot of areas so that may be the reason.

The dialects of danish have grammars, pronunciations and vocabularies that can differ quite a bit from standard danish. If you already have a good understanding of standard danish, it may be worth to have a look at it.

2 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IanEvison

This is very cool, so have an up vote and a ligot. Good to understand that much of this is mostly of historical interest. Unless you plan on looking up the grandparents of those you meet, you are not likely to hear a lot of the accents so carefully mapped out here. Media and popular culture are quickly pushing the influence of the Copenhagen dialect starting tight the young across the country. (http://politiken.dk/kultur/ECE1892272/koebenhavnerne-har-magten-over-det-danske-sprog/). From what I hear, one good way to get an idea of what Danish is becoming is to listen to the teens on the metro line going North out of Copenhagen. Huge increase in use of English words and expressions, starting with use of our swear words with even more enthusiasm that we anglophones, and increasing tendency to leave out even more sounds.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

I have to disagree with you on the idea that this is mainly for historical interests. If you actually talk to people (especially after they've had a few beers) it's quite evident that the rumour that the dialects are going extinct is wildly exaggerated. People just tone done the dialects when talking to people from a different region. There are fewer dialects today than in the 19th century, but there are still a lot of them; especially in Jutland, and they do differ quite a bit from what is spoken in Copenhagen. It's not wildly important to know the differences since virtually everybody will be able to speak standard danish (or already use a dialect very close to it).

A relevant anecdote: a friend of mine, from Funen, went to northern Jutland on a summer holiday where she met one of the locals. They tried to speak to each other but failed to do so in danish; neither of them where able to understand what the other where saying. They had to use German to be able to communicate. This is not the only person I've heard about having the same experience.

Personally I haven't been in a situation where I wasn't able to understand what people where saying (except for a few words I didn't recognize) but I can easily see someone who has only learned standard danish, and never heard about any of the dialects, having problems if they went to Tønder and tried to make out what they where saying, even if they did try to use standard danish. Thisted probably wouldn't be much better.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aulawabbel
Aulawabbel
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A relevant anecdote: a friend of mine, from Funen, went to northern Jutland on a summer holiday where she met one of the locals. They tried to speak to each other but failed to do so in danish; neither of them where able to understand what the other where saying. They had to use German to be able to communicate. This is not the only person I've heard about having the same experience.

Lol and here all these years I thought this skit was pure fiction.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darchy77

xD I think your friend is a little bit exaggerated. I lived in Funen (was there where I begin to learn danish) and now in north jutland and it is not so different they talk... maybe people from "den mørk jyland" talk a little different (also in Funen they talk a little funny for the rest of the land), but danes can understand good each other

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

It is true that the dialects still exist and new ones arise, but I think it is safe to say that they are not as strong (or different to std. Danish) as they used to be. My grandparents from Funen spoke like some of those clips on the KU-website.

However listening to my cousins from Funen, they do not at all have the same nasal accents for instance on words like 'den' or 'gang'. They don't use three genders for nouns. My grandparents would say 'ei kat' - 'katti' instead of 'en kat' - 'katten'.

You can still hear by their dialects that they are from Funen, but is a dialect much closer to std. Danish than my grandparents'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

I don't think people from Funen would be a problem even if it was someone with a very heavy accent.

The three gender grammar is still used but it might not be as evident since the difference between ei and en is not that big and I'm not sure if people are actually aware of it.

One of my neighbours from Odense use three genders and would say katti; he's 34 -- all of his 4 kids do the same. My 5 year old son has started to say katti and use three genders (which annoys me quite a bit since I don't).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

I don't have any problems with people from Funen. All I was saying is that I think on the basis of my own experiences that dialects - although I agree that they continue to exist and thrive - are becoming less different from std Danish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

I was not implying that you would have any problems with people from Funen (speech or otherwise), but I do see how you might have misunderstood me. Please excuse me if you thought I where.

I wanted to write a much longer comment but decided that it was getting a bit too close to politics. Enjoy the site if you think it's interesting or that it might help you in some way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poulpoul

@hertzum

Yes, let's leave it at this. We probably agree more than it appears to.

Yes, I like the site a lot. Used some time to explore it..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pierocasamia
Pierocasamia
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Very interesting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/basak.o

Wow, I didn't think there would be so many different dialects. I had only assumed maybe some small differences in Jylland vs Sjælland... Thank you, it was very interesting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

Do remember that you're not likely to feel the full impact of the dialects as a non-local -- I just thought it might be nice to prepare people so that they didn't expect every Dane to use standard Danish all of the time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/basak.o

Yes, you're right. Thank you, that was helpful. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ohheyitslilly
ohheyitslilly
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Synes ikke at den fra Østjylland rammer helt rigtigt. Jeg er heller ikke enig i at grammatikken er forskellig i landet som du skriver, men du har ret i at både udtale og ordforråd kan være helt forskelligt. Jeg har dog kun set folk skrive rigsdansk udelukkende.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hertzum

Mig bekendt er der ingen der bruger andet end standard dansk når de skriver. Der bliver ikke undervist i andet og der er en tendens til at se andre former for dansk som værende forkert. Holdningen er at standard dansk -er- dansk, ikke blot en form for dansk.

Det er som sådan ikke mig der skriver at grammatikken er forskellig i de forskellige dialekter men adskillige sprogforskeres årelange forskning. En smule erfaring med hvordan folk taler afslører også hurtigt at man faktisk har forskellig grammatikker rundt om i landet; det eneste man skal gøre er at lade være med at antage at folk forsøger at bruge standard dansk og fejler -- "fejlene" er systematiske og er derfor ikke fejl, men en måde at bruge sproget på der er forskellig fra standard dansk. Jeg vil gerne gøre opmærksom på at der kan være forskellige meninger om hvorvidt dialekterne er ved at uddø blandt sprogforskere; det lader til at de der arbjeder på KU har konstateret at der ikke er nogen der taler andet end standard dansk, imens dem fra Århus universistet finder frem til det stik modsatte.

Der er ingen der bruger standard dansk i dagligdagen -- kun noget der minder om det; alle har "fejl" i deres sprog. Jeg vil f.eks. gerne sige "han tog hans ske og spiste hans suppe" uden at mene at "han" spiser en anden mands suppe, med en anden mand ske. På standard dansk betyder det netop at han spiser en andens suppe med en andens ske; for at udtrykke det samme på standard dansk skal man formulere sig "han tog sin ske og spiste sin suppe". For at sige at han spiste en anden mands suppe ville jeg sige "han tog mandens ske og spiste mandens suppe".

Netop Østjylland mener jeg er godt beskrevet. Jeg kommer selv fra Vejle og kan sagtens genkende de grammatiske træk der er beskrevet, både fra mig selv, min familie og de personer jeg ellers kender fra området. Det samme gælder, især, udtalen. Nu er netop østjylland nok den der er sværeste at se er forskellig fra standard dansk af de ikke-sjællandske dialekter (og nok også inklusiv de sjællandske dialekte). Det er blandt andet her, det 2 kønssystem standard dansk har, kommer fra. TV-dansk siges også at være en variant af Århusiansk og hvis jeg skal være helt ærlig, så mener jeg ikke at de københavnske dialekter lyder særligt meget som standard dansk. For mig minder det mere om en bastard af århusiansk og nordsjællandsk.

2 years ago