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  5. "Jeg må arbeide i helgen."

"Jeg arbeide i helgen."

Translation:I need to work on the weekend.

December 13, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolgast

With i kveld and i morgen referring specifically to tonight and tomorrow, does this also refer to coming weekend and not just any weekend? And if so, would any weekend be om helgen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nanwithaplan

I'm also wondering this--how do you say "I have to work this weekend"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camril

Doesn't "i helgen" mean "this weekend"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HTVWI

In English it is usually "at the weekend" or "over"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

In *British English. At sounds very off to my American ears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleantrash

I'd just say over or during.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loekild

I wrote 'i have to work the weekend' and it was wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blaeksbiofor

"I have to work on the weekend." worx


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amyhasnolife

How do i hear the difference of arbeide and arbeider? Or like what is the difference between the 2 words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e-lt

is it arbeide or jobbe??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

I THINK you can use either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Van_Nocturne

What is the difference between "må" and "trenger" for the word "need"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claire650173

why is this I need to, rather than I have to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nic698651

Sorry to come back to this again. "I have to work on [it]" (where [it] is something) means I have to improve my knowledge or technique or plans. So if I don't know what the plan is for the weekend, I might say: I'll work on [planning] the weekend. Is this what "Jeg må arbeide i helgen." means? Do I need to work on [learn] it?

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