https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

How would you translate this sort of sentence?

Examples "She made me do that" "My mom made me clean my room"

The verb I need is "to make someone do something" for translating some lyrics of a song into Esperanto.

Dankon anticipe,

Dave

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rubatavolo
rubatavolo
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I would use devigi (PIV: fari, ke iu devu). If someone used force to make someone do something, I might use truddevigi instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

So that would be "Shi devigis min fari tion" and "Mia patrino devigis min purigi mian chambron" or are there errors in constructing that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rubatavolo
rubatavolo
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Yeah, that looks good! No errors at all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Dankon!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudolfFischer

"to make someone to do something" is in Esperanto "igi"

Mia patrino igis min purigi mian chambron.

Only to force someone ... is "devigi"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swisle

I have a similar predicament. How would i translate "Please, don't force me to work!"?

I first thought it would be "Bonvolu, ne devigi min labori!" but when i say that i have to use the accusative "min" as both a subject and a direct object.

Can someone help me confirm or deny whether this translation is right or wrong? And if wrong how can i translate such sentences using three verbs in this way?

Similarly how would i say "Don't force me to force him to work!"? I think it might be "Ne devigu min devigi lin labori!" but it also looks ugly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudolfFischer

"Bonvolu ne devigi min labori": This sentence is right, but without comma.

"min" is only the direct object of "devigi", NOT also the subject of "labori".
If you insist to have a subject for "labori", say "Bonvolu ne devigi min, ke mi laboru." Because in Esperanto there are many ways to express the same, you can also say: "Bonvolu ne devige laborigi min." or "Bonvol_e_ ne devige laborig_u_ min."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
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Someone just gave me a link to a page that addresses the use of -ig- with two objects.

According to http://pages.ucsd.edu/~dkjordan/eo/colloq/colloq120.html , if you want to say:

  • She made him buy a house.

you translate him to al li, like this:

  • Ŝi aĉetigis al li domon. (She made him buy a house.)

A few more examples:

  • Ŝi farigis al mi tion. (She made me do that.)
  • Mia patrino legigas al mi tiun libron. (My mother makes me read that book.)
  • La knabo manĝigas al la hundo viandon. (The boy feeds the dog some meat.)

The sentence:

  • My mom made me clean my room.

is a little tricky, however. That's because purigi is already the -ig-derived form of the adjective pura. Therefore, as discussed in the thread at https://www.duolingo.com/comment/13360793 , I would say:

  • Mia patrino igis min purigi mian ĉambron. (My mother made me clean my room.)

I hope this helps, Dave.

2 years ago
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