https://www.duolingo.com/akreutzer82

Multiple languages simultaneously?

Hi all,

I'm new to this. I was born and raised by German parents in Germany (native language = German), but have lived in the US since 2009. I consider myself fluent in English, and am relearning Spanish and French from English. I took Spanish from 9th through 13th grade (yep, when I got my Abitur, there were still 13 grades in Germany), and French from 7th through 10th grade.

Should I complete one language first, then do the other, or would it be beneficial/sensible to relearn them at the same time. I was able to test out of the Spanish basics, but struggled with French.

Thanks, Andy

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

It's really up to you. Some people would rather complete one language first, then do the other, then again, some people would rather do both at the same time. Personally, I think I'd do both at the same time.

Something I did, (do) is one day, I will work on my Spanish tree, strengthening skills, learning skills, doing Immersion etc. etc. The next day I would do the same, but this time with my French tree. The same with Esperanto. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrazyKaderKat

I'm the type of person that does 1 at a time. With what you said though, it makes me think:

When you are done learning one language, and you go on to the next language, won't you forget the other language?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teenage_Polyglot

Review frequently. Another thing to do is "ladder". This is learning one language, from another, like Spanish for German speakers. You use the language you learned to learn another. I really like this method.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrazyKaderKat

hmm sounds cool, i might try it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

No, because you start over from the beginning. Sometimes it may be a bit confusing, but with persistence, the confusion will fade. Spanish and French may have some similarities, but at the same time are really quite different, in the accent and the spelling. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrazyKaderKat

;) ok thx

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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My best advice is to experiment to find out what works for you. Some people stick with one language and do it to death, others jump around. Some people race through the tree and then go back to consolidate, others only move forwards when the previous parts of the tree are all gold. These are all valid ways to study, and none of them is inherently better than another, so the best thing to do is to dip your toe in and find out for yourself what works for you. I could tell you all about how I approach things, but that doesn't mean what works for me will work for you :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samilnegor

I tried to do multiple simultaneously for a short time, and I realised that I could not do it, one was always more dominant, I spent most of my time on one. So I decided to do one by one. But I think that is up to you, if you can manage to do multiple simultaneously, then I think you should do so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/painai2
painai2
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You can do as many languages at a time as you want, just limited by the amount of time you have to devote per day to study . At least, that's my experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doostrunk
doostrunk
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The thing you need to know is that when you learn a language, the brain will keep thinking about what you learned even when you're done learning. That means that when you're motivated to learn a language, your brain is entirely dedicated to it and you won't even realize that you're learning faster and better.

Now, you can still learn several languages at the time but you have to set a border between the courses otherwise there are chances to mix them up. For instance, you can simply learn them at different times of the day or make an other activity between the courses such as sport.

That's my opinion, at least. I'm currently learning two languages that are quite similar (German & Afrikaans) and I'm able to not mix them up because of that. I was also learning Russian but I gave up until I become fluent in one of these two languages, but it's also a matter of time.

Whether you choose to learn one, two, or three languages at the time, I wish you good luck. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akreutzer82

Thanks for all your answers!

2 years ago
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