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  5. "Я устала."

"Я устала."

Translation:I am tired.

December 15, 2015

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finndj

If the person that is "я" were a man, would it be "Я устал?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Wait, so what’s ‘I was tired’ or ‘I got tired‘?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slycelote

Technically, Я устала = "I got tired", and "I am tired" = Я уставшая, but no one talks like that, so you have to use "Я устала" here too. And since Russian doesn't have a "Past Perfect" tense, "I was tired" is also translated as Я устала.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

So you wouldn’t say Я была уставшая?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthur0703

It just doesn't sound like proper Russian.

Everyone would say "Я устала" in all cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnTesla

Why not? "Я была такая уставшая, что не стала готовить ужин".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthur0703

Hm, I suppose you're right.

However we can't use уставшая in all cases. For example, a person who is tired would rather say "Я устал!" than "Я уставший!" Especially when the word is alone (without такая etc). So I think it is easier for the Russian learners to memorize only one but flexible and always appropriate way to express it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spleens88

The infinitive of 'to get tired' is уставать


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/curt

уставшая is a participle, maybe that's why people don't prefer it here; participles are more common in written and/or formal Russian, not so much in conversation (though there are exceptions like следующий 'next' or бывший 'former'). I have a few videos about them here (http://preview.tinyurl.com/z3obl53), but people who are just starting out with Russian shouldn't worry about them too much at the beginning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trixterii_

It's funny how they say it as a girl version of the word, but they used a man's voice in the actual question in a lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dschilmoeller

But it's 'Ya Ustal' for guys, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Surfpals

I like how it was a dude saying hes tired with a feminine ending. Those quirky Russians


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David374220

If "Я устал" means "I AM tired", then how do you say "I WAS tired"? "Я был усталым"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanChekhov

"Я устал" is used in both cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertDenver

Male voice is using a female ending??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

Why not "I've got tired"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scubadog_

I think the only way that would work is if you said "I've gotten tired"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taffarelbergamin

Thanks. I'm not native, so I get some of these things wrong... I was thinking on sentences like "I've got to go" and "I've got something for you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie114840

"Gotten" is American English. The rest of us say "got"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeMacDon18

Must chime in that "gotten" is the older form. Using "got" as the participle is more recent in English. Not saying people who use "got" are wrong, just that "gotten" was in use as a participle in every English speaking region before "got"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngochung72

Устал и устала are past forms, right? Then why "i was tired" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa932425

I suppose, "I was tired" requires some additional past time indicator. For example, "I was tired yesterday" would be OK, but it means "Я была уставшей вчера". "Я устала" without any time indicator suggests that I got tired and I am tired in the present moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elen.baker

It can be used in all cases. i am tired, I was tired. It's the same but only that word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Why isn't it " я устаю́" since it is "I am tired', not " I was tired"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavino90163

Isn't устал(а) past tense? Why is past tense used to say "I AM tired"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SlayTheLegend

Is there any difference between saying "я устал" and "я усталый"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

"Tired" in "I am tired" is not a verb, it's a predicate adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey387055

Почему ответ "я устал" засчитан как неправильный? Правильным считается только: "Я усталА". "I am tired". Где здесь половые признаки?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveH780456

У женщины низкий голос!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/holderwd93

мне нравится твоя фотография


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZezeFortun

Don't Russian people get tired in the present?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertDenver

It's that woman with a man's voice again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethan30211

Yikes, this is really confusing me. I can't really understand how "I am tired" and "I was tired" are interpreted the same. They're not the same - at least not too me. "I am tired" - still currently tired (present). "I was tired" - was tired at the time (past). There has to be some way of distinguishing between the two, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FolkSng

why does duolingo make me tired always hearing "устал" Stop repeating there should be more verbs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladDanilo10

I think that "I got tired" is more correct here as a Russian talker (my family from Ukraine) ;) basically, she said something that happened to her in the past... why? because you can use that in a sentence in Russian when "I got tired yesterday after the work" It's my opinion, but that option 100% should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejlens

Confusing to use 'to be tired' so many times in this lesson. I understand that it is the past tense but in English is seems like the present tense (even though 'tired' is a past participle so in a way it is past tense in English too! Maybe think of it as 'I tired' rather than 'I am tired') It would have maybe been better had Duolingo chosen a more straightforward example of the past tense for a first lesson about this topic, no?

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