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  5. "Moja żona nie chce więcej zł…

"Moja żona nie chce więcej złota."

Translation:My wife does not want any more gold.

December 15, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anula193

That a strange wife! :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfwgator

Said no wife ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver815124

she prefers diamonds now ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SurrealSoul

Damn! I thought she didn't want more than 1 złoty :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiktorka234

Złoto może oznaczać 'coin,' prawda?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Not really. Maybe in some RPG games? Not sure. Sometimes players use the word "gold" in Polish and decline it: "Potrzebuję więcej golda".

"Złoty" (masculine singular adjective) is the name of our currency, maybe you refer to this?

The word for a coin is "moneta".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Euhan1

So many words are similar or identical to Italian. Moneta is exactly the same.

I understand that this has a very simple explanation (latin influence from the catholic church, academia and from the romans (via intermediary languages)) but still.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiktorka234

Przepraszam że nie odpowiedziałam wczesniej. Tylko chciałam tłumaczenie na 'coin,' i już dałeś mi to polskie słowo. I już wiem że ''złoty" znaczy waluta Polski. Jak zwykle, dziękuję za Twoją odpowiedź. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirko903131

...nigdy nie powiedział żaden mąż.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chce_polski

If you believe that, you're a moron.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MassoudSR

Probably her head was hit by a coconut :)))))))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

any more is normal in British English. Anymore is very rare and usually used of time. I can't come anymore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yeah, "anymore" is a completely different thing. That's why it surprises me that it's accepted, it shouldn't. I changed it to "any more" and put it in the main answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill660554

Any more is not the same as anymore. When spelled as two words, any more refers to quantities. ... When spelled as one word, anymore is an adverb that refers to time. It means “at present,” “still,” or “any longer.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

This is like dancing on the head of a pin. How.many English speakers would know, or care about, such a nicety


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/F4yY9kZj

The elite speakers, who have an outsize influence on the language, care.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill660554

Absolutely. I was just responding to the comment above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/F4yY9kZj

How do you say 'golden' (or 'gold' as an adjective)? (Sorry, I'm away from my dictionary.) It wouldn't be 'złoty', would it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It would, actually. So the Polish currency's name means exactly that: golden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceAdams14

What's wrong with "My wife does not want more money"? Do you need that written as "moneta"? I know Zloty translate literally as gold as well as being the currency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceAdams14

I note "My wife does not want more zloty" is also not accepted here. Why aren't zloty and gold interchangable in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

"Moneta" means "coin".
"Money" translates to "pieniądze", hence "więcej pieniędzy".

Złoty is not the noun used here, otherwise it would have been więcej złotych. This sentence features the noun złoto.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/z%C5%82oto#Declension_2
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/z%C5%82oty#Noun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob316894

C'mon, guys. Joking aside.. I've just asked my wife if she wanted any more gold and she answered "No, why?". Seriously. So.. there is always hope. Zawsze jest nadzieja :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mario627812

Capitalist husbands always want gold. Ask them.

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