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https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

Latin?

Are there any plans to add Latin to Duolingo courses in the future? If not, does anyone know a website where I can learn Latin, as an English speaker? Thanks.

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew-Macdonald

I don't believe Duolingo has any plans of adding Latin soon. However there is a site called Memrise where you can learn quite a few languages (including Latin). I recommend that you start out there with Basic Latin I and Basic Latin II (I study Latin on there and those two course are where I started off).

Here's a link to Memrise: http://www.memrise.com/home/

Here's a link to Basic Latin I: http://www.memrise.com/course/74845/basic-latin-i/

Here's a link to Basic Latin II: http://www.memrise.com/course/93231/basic-latin-ii/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

Thank you! I will give that a try.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solidgitarius
solidgitarius
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Luis von Ahn said a year ago that they are "definitely going to add Latin". See here: https://www.reddit.com/r/duolingo/comments/230umo/iam_luis_von_ahn_cofounder_and_ceo_of_duolingo_ama/cgsev5y

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

Oh wow, that's great! I had no idea. I'll be looking forward to that!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Hello Lutalicaa, please edit your post and move it to the Duolingo (English) forum. The Troubleshooting forum is only for glitch reports. Thanks! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

Ah, I am sorry, at the time I was not able to post elsewhere. I have moved it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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It would be GREAT to have Latin on Duolingo.

There aren't any sites like Duolingo that teach Latin, although on Duolingo there is an informal course being presented in these Discussions that is very nice.

Here's a cut-and-paste of a post from a week back, with a couple of additions, that gives study suggestions.

. . . Most Latin texts are old-fashioned grammar/translation methods. If you do not mind that way of learning there are many to choose from. Wheelock's Latin (although it has been jazzed up recently to no great advantage), Latin: An Intensive Course, by Moreland and Fleischer (it is intensive), Teach Yourself Latin, by G. Betts are good to excellent. The first has answers to only the "Optional Self-Tutorial Exercises" at the end of the book, and the Betts book has a key to all its exercises; the other two do not have keys. There are other methods available to buy that are probably as good.

For similar books online of the same sort but usually older, look at the "Latin Books with Keys" section on this page; many are good; the Adler book is quite thorough, if rather non standard (the English is dated, as he lived in the 1800s and was a friend of Herman Melville's, but the Latin is pretty good for the basics). Also the Betts book mentioned above is available to download, as is a predecessor by F. K. Smith, which also has a complete key. Most of these books can be bought inexpensively, used.

Some books to download and a useful forum are at textkit.

A very friendly listserv offers group "lessons" every so often, where participants read the text (usually the Wheelock primer mentioned above, or a primer of Biblical Latin), send in an assignment every week or two by e-mail and compare their answers; there are also groups there that read original Latin texts in the same way.

If you are willing to wait until next September, a very enjoyable course should start then, which works its way through the older Assimil Latin method, once a year. But I'd suggest you start now and then add the course in Sept.

A "natural method" book is Lingua Latina per se illustrata, which basically bootstraps Latin by using nothing but Latin, and it is well written and effective. This link presents the text of the first chapter with its audio. The whole book continues in just this way. If you think you would like it, I'd recommend getting the software ("Interactive Latin Course") if you can, which is just like what you see and hear in the video linked to--however, be warned that the programming is intensely primitive, and sometimes it's easier just to view the course's text in .pdf and listen to the audio on its own--both are on the CD. Look it up at amazon.com as the American publisher's webpage has it listed as "out of stock." It's now being distributed by a different firm in the U.S. , and it looks like the prices are being jacked up, so proceed with caution. But then again, there's always hope that the software of the course will be improved.

For practice you might try Bliu Bliu, which is free (but annoying because of their time slicing) or available for a low monthly premium (and not annoying).

So, how do you like to learn? If you do not mind an old-fashioned grammar/translation approach, you'll have by far the most choice. If you can hack Lingua Latina per se illustrata or the older Assimil course, they're both excellent, too.

I wish you the best of success! Please ask if you want clarification or more info. (FWIW, my Latin is pretty rusty, but I can still read it and am concentrating on improving it, instead of doing much on Duolingo.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

Wow, what a detailed response! Thank you. I am fine with an old-fashioned approach so I will definitely look into all of those. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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You're welcome. Latin and Greek are treasure troves for an old-fashioned approach, especially with the many answer keys and the mass of schoolbooks available, used..

Don't neglect Lingua Latina per se illustrata. You can see how you like it by studying with the YouTube link given, and be aware that as the vocabulary increases the similarity to "Dick and Jane" quickly vanishes, thankfully.

Also, if you want to meet people (virtually) who really like Latin, from beginner to adept, join the listserv (especially) and the "Assimil Latin method" mentioned.

Have fun! Latin is marvelous. In fact, it is what I should be doing now, rather than hanging out on the Duo forums. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Texangymnast

I don't think that there is, but there is going to be Klingon (for some reason, but it would be almost absolutely useless, and I think Latin would be more useful because it is the base of a lot of languages). I would also like Latin, but the only way to do it is if someone fluent in that language asked to help develope it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lutalicaa

I agree. Klingon is kind of a fun idea, but it seems to be purely for recreational use, and I think that Latin would be much more useful as a course. It's understandable that finding a fluent Latin speaker would be a bit difficult though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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no language learned is useless. and Latin being the base of a lot of languages does not make it inherently useful.

2 years ago