"Вы знаете её книгу?"

Translation:Do you know her book?

2 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FayezEltah

i dont understand the cases and the more i read abiut them here on doulingo the more confused i become. can some one recommend a good source. or perhaps they can improve the explanation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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The short version is that nouns change their shape depending on what role they play in a sentence.

In the sentence "The boy goes to the store with his mother to buy a book" you have a subject who does the action (boy, nominative case) , a direct object that is the thing acted upon (book, accusative case), and two objects that are objects of prepositional phrases (to the store and with the mother).

Different languages treat these differently; for example, English only distinguishes between pronouns (I/me, he/him, she/her, etc.) and other nouns do not change their shape depending on where they are in the sentence, while Russian identifies six different "roles".

If you want a much longer version try here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FayezEltah

thank you very much. your explanation plus the link helped a lot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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Glad it helped!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hfh777
hfh777
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Would the sentence in Russian be (using Yandex translate):

"Мальчик идет в магазин с мамой купить книгу"?

Google translate has a slightly different version:

"Мальчик идет в магазин с мамой, чтобы купить книгу"

Can you say if both versions are ok? Thanks in advance!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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I don't really know. I was just explaining the difference between the different functions that nouns can have in a sentence and picked a sentence that had a bunch of examples. Slight differences in translation into Russian is way beyond me at this point.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnny_MMX

both are OK, the latter preferable

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hfh777
hfh777
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Благодарю вас.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parchessey
Parchessey
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I find this site to be pretty helpful and it is also free. I haven't gone deep into the lessons about cases yet but the other lessons I've done were informative. Hope this helps! http://www.russianforfree.com/lessons-russian-language-contents.php

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diogogomez

Thank you for the link. It seems a really good tool for Russian learners.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mantpaa

The book is hers. The book is in accusative then, yes? Or do i misunderstand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanisaChatte
JanisaChatte
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Yes, book is in accusative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2E3S
2E3S
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Yes, знать takes an object in Accusative (as the most verbs I think given without a preposition).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AzerMasood

The sentence is unnatural.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

What's the meaning of this phrase ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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It needs some context, but the general meaning is whether or if the person being asked is aware that she wrote and published a book, if the person has some knowledge of what the book is about, and whether the person may or may not have read it.

There are many aspects about the book which the person may or may not know: how successful it has been, how well-known, what effect it has had, whether it is regarded as a good book or not, etc.

"Knowing" a book implies some unspecified amount of familiarity with it, but may be as simple as only having heard it was published. The person could respond, "Oh, I heard something about that. Is it selling a lot of copies? How have the critics reviewed it?"

Alternatively, the answer could be, "Oh, yes, I've read it twice and I loved it! What a great novel - her second, I believe. She is such a good writer."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yadwinder_gadari

Thanks

1 year ago
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