1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Polish
  4. >
  5. "Śpiewacie, bo jesteście wese…

"Śpiewacie, bo jesteście weseli."

Translation:You are singing because you are cheerful.

December 18, 2015

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

I like the almost-connection between the word "weseli" and the similar English term "wassail".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emwue

Superficial – 'wassail' comes from Old Norse, „wesoły” from proto-slavic *veselъ, so it's just coincidental they seem similar. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Oh yes, I quite get your point here. However, I like to look for connections, even though they might be superficial, or even in this case, totally spurious, as I find that such connections can act as useful aides mémoires.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emwue

Yeah, I know that – I just mentioned that, because with Polish huge catalogue of words with Germanic origin(German alone is 'responsible' for almost 30% of our words, and there are also numerous borrowings from Low German[during Hanseatic League period]; Old Norse/Swedish and so on), some might think the two are actual cognates, like say English 'thank'/German 'danken' and Polish „dziękować” or English 'rede'/German 'Rat' and Polish „rada”. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlehGerdy

"Gay" is a synonym to "cheerful", "merry". Here and in other exercises it is reported as an error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Checking the English wiktionary for "gay", we find that such usage is "dated". Checking further what exactly they mean by 'dated', we see: "Formerly in common use, and still in occasional use, but now unfashionable; for example, wireless in the sense of "broadcast radio tuner", groovy, and gay in the sense of "bright" or "happy" are all dated. Dated is not as strong as archaic or obsolete."

So... why use it? I know this usage of course, but I really think it could be interpreted as "You sing because you are homosexual, singing is gay and not for real men"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlehGerdy

"Dated is not as strong as archaic or obsolete."" Actually, in English literature it is used quite often. So why not, if it's still correct in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Well okay, "why not". If you want it, of course I'm gonna report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zimowski

"is gay and not for real men" hope you aren't seriously

I think this point of view on homosexuality is dated, not the word ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I meant a potential understanding, not my opinion ;) I think many non-natives don't even have a clue that the word 'gay' used to mean something else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CosmicAvatar

Is "weseli" an irregular masculine personal plural of wesoły? I think this is the first time I've come across it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Yes! See https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/weso%C5%82y and click "declension of wesoły" to see the full table of forms....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CosmicAvatar

Fab, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

You're welcome! Wiktionary is my first port of call with grammar questions such as the one you posed. It has to be remembered, though, like Wikipedia, it can be wrong sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I remember it being wrong literally two times so far, so I'd say it's pretty safe ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walkinthedog

Back in the day, wesele was a wedding as in,dzisaj wesele, jutro poprawiny. Bawdy affairs to say the least, the poor know how to party.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walkinthedog

Ali 1989, dzieki. Teraz wien dlaczego sie nazywa wtorek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothernobody

Is it a common occurrence in bars in Poland, when people just break out into song, or does the singing never really stop? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Can’t this be in the imperative too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tadjanow

The imperative would be 'śpiewajcie'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartpupa

I think "Sing, because you are happy" should be OK??? Here Śpiewacie would be used almost like a command.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

"śpiewajcie" is command

"śpiewacie" is you sing/you are singing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartpupa

Many thanks :-) Makes sense once you point it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walkinthedog

Would'nt the word happy also work in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

'happy' works already, although technically it's closer to 'szczęśliwi'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingouser621

Should "bo" always be preceded by a comma in the same way as "że"? Well, not always, but nearly always.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yes it should, it introduces another clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingouser621

Thanks. Slowly starting to make sense of this punctuation...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

Glad you accept happy but it is so much more common in English that I think it should be the main transslation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walkinthedog

I am wondering what the connection to , Wtorek is for Tuesday, Poniedzlek after monday, Sroda, middle, Piantek , fifth and the comes another, Sobota, what is the origin there??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Your commet appears to be off-topic, but I'll answer it anyway.

The root wtór- or wtor- means the second one, as in wtórny (secondary), wtórnik (duplicate), powtórzyć (to repeat, to do a second time)...

Sobota simply comes from the Hebrew word שַׁבָּת (English: Sabbath).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Poniedziałek is Monday, the day after ("po") Sunday. Niedziela is Sunday, the day of not working.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cynicist88

You forgot Czwartek (fourth day)!

Learn Polish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.