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  5. "Ein Vogel frisst den Apfel."

"Ein Vogel frisst den Apfel."

Translation:A bird eats the apple.

December 18, 2015

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiva417114

Why we use den instead of der?

September 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

Apfel is the direct object of frisst in this sentence. That puts it in the accusative case, and the accusative article for masculine nouns (der words) is den.

September 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoleenFord

Why is "is eating" wrong but "eats" is correct. Are they not one in the same?

August 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    What was your whole sentence?

    November 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LFish6

    My translation answer is given as “A bird is eating the apple.”

    November 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariusVrbu

    I still dont get it why 'den' is ok here, and not 'einen'. A few sentences back i got it wrong while saying 'den apfel' instead of 'einen apfel. Now its a similar translation and its wrong using 'einen'. Ughhh, you germans, why you make it so hard to learn it.

    November 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bishop6

    "Den" is always referring to a specific object. The apple.

    "Einen" is referring to some unspecified object. An apple.

    With "den" (or "the") the presumption is that the speaker and listener know which particular apple is being discussed. With "einen" it could be any apple, but you don't care.

    November 26, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/16rossdavi

    Fressen refers to eating in an animalistic fashion so devour should be first choice if not at least correct.

    December 18, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr_Eyl

    There's nothing animalistic implied by 'devour'- it simply means to eat quickly or greedily.

    I don't think English even has a direct equivalent to fressen- that is, a word for 'to eat' that is neutral when applied to animals but derogatory when applied to humans.

    December 18, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Delta1212

    I think the closest equivalent is 'to feed (on something)'

    December 19, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr_Eyl

    Definitely!

    When applied to humans, 'to feed on' often has a slightly sinister implication. For animals, it just sounds like they naturally prey on something.

    December 19, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryClayton

    Bust fressen applies to herbivores as well.

    June 13, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    Sheep feed on grass.

    April 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daleen735952

    Afrikaans has a word for animals 'eating' just like German has a specific word. So when you see the word Frisst it means its an animal doing the eating.

    March 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    Yes, German fressen is related to Dutch vreten (Afrikaans vreet) and even English "fret" in the sense of "to devour".

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fressen#German

    [2019/04/23]

    April 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camelia_ac

    Why is it "einen hund" but "ein vogel"? Are they not both "der"?

    August 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ApisBe

    "Ein" is the masculine nominative form of "a," where "einen" is the masculine accusative form. Nominative is for subjects, accusative is for direct objects. "Der" is the masculine form of "the."

    August 9, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camelia_ac

    Thank you.

    August 9, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    Keep in mind that both Vogel and Hund are capitalised since they're nouns. The words "vogel" and "hund" don't exist in German.

    [2019/04/23]

    April 23, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbhijithYK

    If vogel is masculine then why isn't einen used instead of ein vogel!?

    February 24, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ApisBe

    "einen" is the accusative form, which is reserved for direct objects. "Vogel" in this sentence is nominative, which means we use "ein."

    August 9, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1otK

    "Hauschtier" is wrong!! It is also not a dialect word. My mother tongue is German.

    February 1, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeverleyRa3

    Listened twice and still sounds like einen....typed den when einen and einen when den Doh!!!

    April 5, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dolyttle

    Why is it wrong to answer this translation with "The bird is eating the apple"? the bird, is still A bird... is it that wrong?

    November 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bishop6

    "The bird" is "Der Vogel", "A bird" is "Ein Vogel". A and The mean different things!

    November 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dolyttle

    Well yes and no, in english perse lol. Both interchange. Le sigh these trip me up so much sometimes! But thank you =)

    November 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsmeindi

    I believe I typed "a bird is eating the apple," and it was accepted. Using "eats" should be fine as well though hmm...

    November 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BudHines1

    Couldnt it also mean a bird is eating an apple. I think both should be marked as correct.

    December 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bishop6

    No, because "den Apfel" explicitly means "the apple", not "an apple". "Den" is like "the": it's the definite article, not "an" which is the indefinite article.

    December 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve945968

    i could have sworn he said ...ein apfel at the end of that sentence. i didnt hear den at all

    January 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

    There is no word applesf. For some weird reason my apple was corrected in a flash (as the answer was entered) by my phone to applesf. Ain't technology great!!!

    April 3, 2019
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