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  5. "Jeg spiste for mye godteri."

"Jeg spiste for mye godteri."

Translation:I ate too much candy.

December 19, 2015

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nic698651

(Sigh: UK language use alert) We do have candy in UK, but it's more specialised than in US usage, and the illustration in the vocabulary exercise would be called a sweet, a sweetie or a wrapped chocolate / toffee. I could eat too much candy in US, but I ate too many sweeties in UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoidy287

Thinking about the American-British difference, where British would have 'a sweet', but American would have 'a piece of candy', would Norwegian be 'et godteri' or 'en bit godteri'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmering

I think it's many candies instead of much candy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingebj

"Godteri" means candy/sweets in general, so IMHO it is a better translation to put "too much candy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakerrison

It could just as easily be one big candy, in which case 'too much candy' would seem fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

English idioms actually derive from the use of quantifiers and possessive plural (originally ending in -a in Old English). Thus 'there is much gold' = 'þǽr is mycel golda', or in this case candy. Think of it as 'much of candies' or 'many a candy'.

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