"Czy możesz przynieść chleb i wino?"

Translation:Can you bring bread and wine?

December 19, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GiacomoBia16

Written "can you bring bread and wine" Suggested "can you bring bread and wine" :D

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

What about 'could you bring bread and wine'? Or does 'musieć' mean physical ability to do something? If yes, how do you construct a similar sentence with the meaning of polite request ("could you...") ?

June 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

It's not 'musieć' (must, have to), it's 'móc' (may, be able to, sometimes 'can'). Just for the record, the declension is here.

The more polite version, corresponding to 'could you', uses conditional. A quick look in the declension table, and we arrive at "Czy mógłbyś przynieść chleb i wino?" :)

And then of course there's plural 'you', so respectively 'możecie' and 'moglibyście'/'mogłybyście' (first one for masculine personal, the other for not masculine-personal).

June 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gaskadsky

Doesn't "przynieść" mean "to fetch"?

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

this is another meaning - https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/fetch is translated as przynosić/przynieść

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

So actually it seems okay, at least without a context. Added "get" and "fetch".

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ajmaeen

how would one say, 'Can you bring some bread?' Just curious since there are no articles, is there a different way of saying 'can you bring the bread?, can you bring some bread? etc ' or are they the same

February 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

You use different case for that - see this thread. In short - '..przynieść chleba' (partitive case).

February 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrius5225

Not exactly. One needs to feel every specific phrase and possible cases/contexts of its use, and I do not find that sentence absolutely identical to this one. In that phrase, "some" adds a meaning which is a little bit unnecessary there, while in this one it would just make it sound more culturally English, I guess.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

I'd just say "trochę chleba", although yes, the partitive "chleba" is possible as well. I think it's rather not accepted in the course if "some" wasn't mentioned.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrius5225

May I ask if English is your native language, or if your sense of interpreting it comes from the culture nurtured in any English speaking country?

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

No, I'm Polish and I've spent my entire life here. My English is pretty good, I believe, but it's definitely not native-like. We have natives helping us decide in some cases, so unless the answer is totally obvious, usually my comment is written after a consultation.

Actually now we very often do accept "some". English seems to use it a lot more often than Polish uses "trochę". Some things simply change with time and things about our policy that I wrote months ago may not be true anymore.

So as for your longest comment: yeah, now we do not have anything against "some" anymore. "any" is also usually accepted if it makes sense on its own in English. It's just that our database is quite big and not every sentence has been edited yet. Added "some" here.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrius5225

Thank you for your reply, dziękuje. Honestly, I have no idea how Duolingo works inside. When I lose virtual hearts in the app in such cases as I've described, it almost hurts. I hope the more people drill through the course and provide their feedback, the more of fun it can become, provided there is also a technical team on the other side to make it perfect.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrius5225

How can "some bread" be viewed as a mistake here, when it sounds more ordinary English than the version suggested above (without "some")? There is often more than just one way of conveying the meaning of a phrase into another language, and it's the target language, not the source, which should matter most for fitting the standard of a good translation. This is a logical rule that professionals follow. It should be very objectionable to absolutize mechanical translations over the common sense interpretations, so I insist on the good English style being the highest arbiter in judging upon validity of translations INTO English. Please, consider all the following. English is a language that uses articles in front of nouns; Polish is not. There are some rules of grammar and good sense in English for using articles, and for not using them, as well as using words like "some" and "any" before nouns. There are many good references that can be found on this topic online. I refer just to one of them, run upon occasionally: http://www.grammar.cl/Notes/Countable_Uncountable_Nouns.htm
Please take note of the point H: ") It is very common in English to use some / any with plural nouns and uncountable nouns "

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim951881

Please allow "Are you able to bring bread and wine?"

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Okay.

June 25, 2018
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