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"Él dejó la comida en mi casa."

Translation:He left the food at my house.

1
5 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

sometimes the article "the" seems to be required ( ie he left "the" food) and sometimes it doesn't ( ie "he left food...") - is there a rule when using articles like "el", 'la", etc that "the" is used?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaiusAugustus

I don't completely know the answer to this, but at least when Duolingo uses "the" in the sentence, they expect the article. There are also special cases, like the days off the week, that always require them. Not sure if there's a rule to help besides memorizing these.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

Thanks. I think I have seen DL use things like "La Primavera esta aqui..." and just translate it as "Spring is here..." but maybe not.....

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

This is true. I saw this too. Duo sometimes (but alas, not always) recognizes when English does not use a "the", which is the case in your example "Spring is here". We would not usually say, "The spring is here". However, when it's more of a choice, and it would sound good with or without the article, I've found that it's safest to inclde the article to match Duo's translations.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

Yes, I have noticed that when the noun is at the beginning of the sentence (or subject?) that the article is used in spanish ( LA Primavera) but not necessarily used in english ( ie Spring) but when it is not at the beginning ( or the object?) it is not used ( as much anyways) and if it IS it has to be used in the english translation ( ie THE food as opposed to just "food")...maybe this is just something I am imagining but...

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

There are also some words that just require an article in Spanish, like time-related words. El lunes, el verano, las tres y media, etc.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schatzie14

It is called"Duodingo" I do the same...

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

jjcthorpe- If you say, he left food at my house, it could be any food. I asked you to by food for a party, I say to my friend he left the food at my house, don't worry.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I was going to pont that out, myself. In this case, it is the same as in English. And as I was going to say, when you are talking about food in general an article is not used. But when you are talking about a certain or specific food an article is needed.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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That's true in English, but articles are sometimes used for general statements in Spanish.

La comida can also mean "the meal."

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Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpaceC
SpaceC
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I didn't even know this verb in the present tense... either I did not pay attention, or they gave one more new word in the past tense sector.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanjoyship

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. And did you notice that in this section they keep having sentences about food?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raguleader

Someone was preparing this lesson right before lunch.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/basicavacado

nah fam i just always think about food

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nick324147

Dejar has not been introduced either in the present or past tense yet so how are users supposed to recognise this spoken word?!

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenM566674

that's what I was thinking! I didn't even know what verb was being conjugated, how can you remember an irregular verb conjugation if you don't even know what the verb is?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

General past tense question: I have heard the term, "preterit" a lot on the forums. What is the difference between "preterit" and past tense? (Is there a difference?) Also, is the corre t spelling "preterit" or "preterite"? I've seen both.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Helen, For me, past tense is a general term for any past tense, whereas preterite / pretérito is the simple past. Simple means only one word involved, not two as in compound tenses. The preterite tense is not easy, and all the most used ones are irregular and just have to be memorized.

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Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenWende1

Thanks!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AAFlaca

This is the verb "dejar." Have they used it before? AND it's irregular. Do most people use supplemental material when they get to this point on Duolingo? Deje, dejaste, dejo, dejamos, dejaron ((Preterit tense of Dejar without accents)

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vsaturday

I have not used supplemental material to this point, but feel I may need to start.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes, I think most people do use supplemental material. My understanding is that Duolingo deliberately didn't add their own reference material, since everyone using Duolingo has access to the internet.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sina-90

Same here... So many new words and most verbs are irregular... These lections are killing me...

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kyra.rae

Can dejó mean 'He LEFT a while a go' and 'He LEFT the food' ? are they the same thing?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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No, the "went away" meaning of "LEFT" is "salió" (salir) or "se fue" (irse).

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GlennAshle

I put "he let food in my house." It was marked wrong. But my son lets his friends bring food into my house, even though it's against the rules. But how would you say that in Spanish?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

permitir - to permit, let, etc

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vlastaris

I thougt lesson one said dejó meant 'tell' but really means 'left'

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vsaturday

I thought so too. That is why I'm here to see if someone else thought that too.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

You are thinking of decir, I'm sure. It is irregular as heck in the preterit and does not carry a written accent. the él form would be dijo.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

Why can it not be ..."He left the food in my house" en = in , what changes it to at in this sentence ?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/g1hodg
g1hodg
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Could "quedar" also be used in this example?

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Reply11 months ago