"Jem zupę."

Translation:I am eating soup.

December 20, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bob20020

Let me get this straight. "Zupe" becomes "Zupę" here because it is in the accusative case?

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Yes and no.

Yes, "zupę" is accusative. But "zupe" is not a thing. The nominative is "zupa."

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill

To be more precise, "zupa" is gramatically feminine, not neuter (the "e" ending?). It is indeed a thing, or rather "stuff" as it is uncountable

For example "dziecko" is neuter, but not a thing. On fhe other hand, "kanapka" is a thing, but feminine, not neuter.

It is important to make this distinction, especially as we don't have grammatical gender in English. Not all that is neuter is "things", and many, probably most, "things" are not neuter.

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

You misunderstand. You seem to be taking "thing" as implying "neuter," which was not my intent. When I say that "zupe" is not a thing, I simply mean that there is no case in which "zupa" takes that form.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill

OK, I think I've got it. You mean perhaps that the word form "zupe" does not exist / nie istnieje? But I'm afraid that I've never before seen "is not a thing" used like that. In British English, at least, we say that something exists or doesn't exist, not that it is or isn't a thing. Or we might say that "there is no such word form as zupe". So, yes, I'm afraid I did misunderstand you, and I think it's just possible others might, as well.

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shiningaardvark

Yes, "is/isn't a thing" is a common expression in American English meaning that something is/isn't done a certain way.

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/pranav_spai

How can someone eat "a" soup.I'm quite sure soup is an uncountable noun since its a liquid.I've never heard someone say "a soup"

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Mass nouns for food can take the indefinite article in English when you're talking about them by the serving. E.g. "I would like to order a soup."

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gerillamarketing

I assume the "a" is goes for the "plate" which is not written but implied.

September 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/krygyz

I've never paid attention to that before...even though I know the sentence is still okay English, it just sounds weird now kek

March 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasTyme

I honestly dont see a difference in pronounciation between ę and a.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CiCi616431

I thought soup was zupa?

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Renardo11

Yes; but when you eat it you need the accusative.

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NickFleck

In american English we usually say that we sip or drink soup. Stew is eaten; soup is drunk.

April 16, 2019
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