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  5. "She loves her husband."

"She loves her husband."

Translation:Hun elsker sin ektemann.

December 20, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

You shouldn't use hennes ektemann here because it could possibly mean the husband of someone else other than the woman the sentence is talking about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Unless that's exactly what you mean to say. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

Who knew :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

Would 'Hun elsker ektemannen sin' be okay?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Yes, that works as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chromalogue

How does one decide, in cases like this, when to use "sin" and when to use "hennes" (or "hans" as the case may be)? It looks like they are both allowed here, but are they always interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

"Sin/Sitt/Sine" points the ownership back to the subject of the sentence, which in this case is "henne". So "Hun elsker sin ektemann" means that she loves her own husband, while "Hun elsker ektemannen hans" means that she loves somebody else's husband.

The English sentence "She loves her husband" is ambiguous, and can translate to either of the Norwegian versions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kimasuzana

But if you use sin, does is have to come before ektemann? Could you say, "hun elsker ektemannen sin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Either placement works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaeskee

Why now is ektemann instead of Mannen to refer to husband?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Either works here, but while "ektemann" will always mean husband, "mann" needs the right context (and usually a possessive) to have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Creature_xx

Shouldn't 'Hun elsker ektemann sin' also work, or does it need to be 'ektemannen sin' for that to work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

It must be 'sin ektemann' or 'ektemannen sin'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TornadoOfSouls

Ektemann sin is marked incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

It is either ektemannen sin or sin ektemann.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gidget84

In the vocabulary listing at the beginning of the lesson is the word 'ekte-'. Is there a meaning for just that prefix?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Quoting Wiktionary:

"Borrowed from German echt (“real”). The German term originates from Middle Low German echt (“lawful, genuine”), contraction of ehacht, variant form of ehaft (“lawful, pertaining to the law”) from ê(e) (“law, marriage”)."

In this lesson, we teach it as a prefix in "ektemann", "ektefelle", and "ektepar". In that context, it can be understood as "lawfully wedded" in English, but you wouldn't explicitly translate it as such outside of your wedding vows.

"Ekte" as a standalone adjective, meaning "real" or "genuine", is taught in Adjectives 3: lesson 5.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matt469116

Are ektemann and ektefelle interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

"Ektefelle" is neutral, like "spouse", so you can use it in place of both "ektemann" and "kone". It's a bit on the formal side, but definitely usable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 132

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielleDean

I will never get this stuff: why is it sin ektemann and not ektemannen sin? I am in despair ):


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

It can be either.

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