"Tu as un rendez-vous avec une fille ?"

Translation:Do you have a date with a girl?

1/11/2013, 1:58:10 PM

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/langlearn_FMS

( ̄ー ̄)

7/21/2014, 4:41:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelLe3139
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How to make the top bar as the eye? ^^

5/27/2018, 8:08:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Teddybear71
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"Meeting" and "appointment" should be okay for "rendez-vous". Who are we to judge the nature of this get-together?

4/28/2018, 4:06:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugan4
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Surely "Do you have a meeting with a girl" should be accepted as well. This is all context.

4/24/2018, 7:46:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
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Agreed. Actually it seems sexist to require a romantic translation here. Would the French wording be different if the sentence were addressed to a (straight) girl, and it was referring to a business meeting or study session?

5/6/2018, 3:44:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/pro-cacador

I believe that your correct. A meeting or an appointment with a girl should be accepted.

5/8/2018, 1:15:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisaskier

"Do you have a meeting with a girl" should be an accepted translation .

Please add it Duo.

Reported 15/5/18

5/15/2018, 7:06:34 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/xavikk

Stop asking mum!!

2/5/2016, 2:23:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
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In another sentence" un rendez-vous" was only accepted as" a meeting", not as "a date". I was informed by a Canadian French speaker that "une date" is more commonly used for "a date". Can a native French speaker comment on this subject? Merci...

8/5/2014, 1:39:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/simpy3
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That's not the case in French. Use rendez-vous for a date in that sense or sortir avec __

10/12/2014, 9:07:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/faraston3001

I put 'do you have an appointment with a girl'? and was marked wrong. My question is : how does one ask 'do you have an appointment with a girl?'. If i run a company, and have a few junior apprecentices lined up to join the company. I have to see each one of them in turn. A friend wants to know about my appointments and gender is casually brought up. How do they ask if i have an appointment with a girl?

4/20/2018, 11:06:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dimensional_dan

Is girl used in the same sense as it is in English as in for women of all ages, or is it only used for female children (similar to niña in Spanish).

1/11/2013, 1:58:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Remy
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It has a general meaning.

1/11/2013, 3:37:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/solaodut

"rendez-vous" means "Appointment OR Meeting" in proper word translation hence my answer should be accepted

6/13/2018, 11:54:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DansEnglishChat

"Fille" doesn't have an "L" sound, correct?

2/25/2013, 5:18:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Remy
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Right.

In French, "LL" is pronounced like a Y in words like "fille".

Please have a look at the following link:

http://french.about.com/od/pronunciation/a/ll.htm

2/25/2013, 3:55:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DansEnglishChat

Great, thanks. There's definitely a problem with the audio in that case.

2/25/2013, 9:37:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Remy
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I don't agree: the audio is correct.

2/25/2013, 9:39:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DansEnglishChat

I see. I was hearing an "l" sound but I guess it's more of a "y".

2/25/2013, 9:40:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Remy
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Exactly.

2/25/2013, 9:44:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/cestmoiap
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It is saying "fille" as 'fee - uh' which I hear those from Reims and North East France say. :)

3/5/2014, 10:29:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/d10MplTj

Lets not get so uppity. I think Duo is simply emphasising the fact that rendez-vous can have different meanings in different contexts.

9/9/2018, 3:05:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel589120

I have just received this email from Duolingo;

Hi Daniel589120,

You suggested “Do you have a meeting with a girl?” as a translation for “Tu as un rendez-vous avec une fille ?” We now accept this translation. :)

Thanks for the contribution, please keep it up!

  • Duolingo
10/6/2018, 9:00:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrienneHy1

Are you meeting a girl?

2/17/2019, 5:58:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Janet844717

Rendezvous can be used in English to suggest a romantic liason with a girl. Why isn't that acceptable as a translation?

2/17/2019, 11:48:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/sfishlock
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Why is "tu as" pronounced "tu a" and not "to az" here ?

10/26/2014, 11:05:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HenryWassermann

IN the fast playback you can hear the s/z but when "as" is pronounced in the slow playback you can only hear "a".

11/19/2014, 12:31:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Amy_Broeders
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Exactly basically if the next word starts with a vowel sound it "liaises" in which the consonant of the last word is said. However in the slow playback it's saying each word individually, thus not sounding the consonant on the end.

5/29/2016, 8:56:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MarianneSt4

I translated it Have you got an appointment with your girl? and it did not paśs because of the word "got". I thought " have got" and "got" were both correct English. Can a native English speaker explain this to me?

11/24/2014, 10:32:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisaskier

Maybe rather it was not the word "Got" but because you wrote "YOUR" girl instead of "A" girl?

5/15/2018, 7:09:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
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This is a complicated subject in English. It is used in colloquial speech by some Americans( I am not sure about the British or Australians) but for written work it is best to avoid. Stick with have or had to show possession. Got or gotten denote "come to have" and were incorrectly absorbed into spoken English to show possession.

11/24/2014, 1:42:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/simpy3
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It's not complicated at all and yes, it derives from Britain as it's roots are in Old, and Middle English and is extremely common here in the UK.

"Got" is the past form of the verb "get". In British English, it's highly common to hear "got" used for events past, present and future BUT, the latter two are informal, quite slangy usages. In formal English, one would only use "got" to refer to past happenings, e.g. "I got a bad feeling when I saw him yesterday".

11/24/2014, 10:57:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
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As a American, that usage sounds British to me. I still think it should be accepted though - the usage of "tu" and the subject matter indicate an informal context.

I would note that the French says "a girl" instead of "your girl", however.

5/6/2018, 3:41:50 PM
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