https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn

So.. Let's like this post and write many coments to create the Galician Course.

Kreilyn
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A little time ago, I saw in previous forums that making famous the request for creating a new course helps a lot. I don't know if it is completely right (I really don't have idea), but I see no objection to the course not to be created.

<h1>Don't you know Galician?*</h1>

This is a beautiful phonetic language spoken in Spain (such as Catalan and other), The most interesting thing is that Galician was "Portuguese" until the fifteenth century, but actually they are not so close as you suppose: ◘ Galician vowels are always open as in Spanish

◘ LL is pronounced as in Spanish

◘ Spanish is not the only language with the letter ñ, Spanish in Galician is *español.

◘ Unlike Portuguese, Galician has relations with its direct and indirect object, that is they can go shortened: mo, to, so, llo, cho, etc.

Galician is a very beautiful language, full of synonymous words and there are many books and poems waiting for you to read them. So like this post and let Duolingo's staff know that you are interested in the richest language of the Iberian Peninsula.

2 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EricaHarley

Galician (Golego) is a Romance language spoken by about 3 million people in Galicia, in the north-west corner of Spain. Galician is more or less mutually intelligible with Portuguese but uses Spanish spelling conventions. In fact, whether Galician and Portuguese are separate languages or dialects of the same language, is a question that has been hotly debated for decades, and is loaded with political and cultural implications.

Galician emerged as a standardised literary language during the 19th century when there was a revival (rexurdimento) in the language and culture of Galicia. One person who was particularly active in the revival movement was Frei Martín Sarmiento. The publication in 1863 of Rosalía de Castro's poem Cantares Gallegos, which was written entirely in Galician, marked the beginning of the revival in the fortunes of Galician.

During early 20th century, an organisation known as the Irmandades da Fala (Brotherhoods of the Language) was set up to defend, promote and dignify the Galician language and a number of Galician language journals began to appear. An attempt in the 1930s to give autonomy to Galicia and official status to Galician was never promulgated due to the Civil War (1936-1939), and speaking of Galician in public was banned during Franco's dictatorship (1939-1975).

Galician gained official status in 1978 and is recognised as one of Spain's five official languages (lenguas españolas), along with Spanish (Castilian), Catalan, Basque and Aranese. Primary and secondary schools in Galicia teach bilingually in Galician and Spanish, and Galician is the main medium of instruction in universities in Galicia.

Some one thousand or so books are published in Galician each year and there is a Galician TV channel, established in 1985, a Galician radio station (set up in 1996), and a daily Galician language newspaper, O Correo Galego.

In cities in Galicia, more Spanish than Galician tends to be spoken. However, Galician is widely spoken in rural areas.


Anyone who wants to learn Galician, here are some online lessons, info and dictionaries (in that order):


Hope this helped!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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I love Rosalia de Castros, and this is ger best poem ever:

<pre>Adios, ríos; adios, fontes; </pre>

adios, regatos pequenos; adios, vista dos meus ollos: non sei cando nos veremos.

Miña terra, miña terra, terra donde me eu criei, hortiña que quero tanto, figueiriñas que prantei,

prados, ríos, arboredas, pinares que move o vento, paxariños piadores, casiña do meu contento,

muíño dos castañares, noites craras de luar, campaniñas trimbadoras da igrexiña do lugar,

amoriñas das silveiras que eu lle daba ó meu amor, camiñiños antre o millo, ¡adios, para sempre adios!

¡Adios groria! ¡Adios contento! ¡Deixo a casa onde nacín, deixo a aldea que conozo por un mundo que non vin!

Deixo amigos por estraños, deixo a veiga polo mar, deixo, en fin, canto ben quero... ¡Quen pudera non deixar!...

Mais son probe e, ¡mal pecado!, a miña terra n'é miña, que hastra lle dan de prestado a beira por que camiña ó que naceu desdichado.

Téñovos, pois, que deixar, hortiña que tanto amei, fogueiriña do meu lar, arboriños que prantei, fontiña do cabañar.

Adios, adios, que me vou, herbiñas do camposanto, donde meu pai se enterrou, herbiñas que biquei tanto, terriña que nos criou.

Adios Virxe da Asunción, branca como un serafín; lévovos no corazón: Pedídelle a Dios por min, miña Virxe da Asunción.

Xa se oien lonxe, moi lonxe, as campanas do Pomar; para min, ¡ai!, coitadiño, nunca máis han de tocar.

Xa se oien lonxe, máis lonxe Cada balada é un dolor; voume soio, sin arrimo... Miña terra, ¡adios!, ¡adios!

¡Adios tamén, queridiña!... ¡Adios por sempre quizais!... Dígoche este adios chorando desde a beiriña do mar.

Non me olvides, queridiña, si morro de soidás... tantas légoas mar adentro... ¡Miña casiña!, ¡meu lar!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/araparseghian
araparseghian
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Copy and pasted Wikipedia, did ya?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricaHarley

Nope. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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But one of those websites, no? [maybe one is yours ?]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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Spanish vowels are not always open. In fact, they are always closed vowels. Check IPA phonetics.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Ohhhh, I mixed it all! But I'm glad you understood that Spanish vowels sound the same all the time!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza
CosmoKaiza
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When I was in Galicia, I didn't know that Galician was a language (Don't blame me, I didn't know I was in Galicia at this time, for me it was just a region of Spain). Anyway, I've read this sign in what I thought was Spanish but actually Galician, I think it was saying "Tienes Fame?" on a Mcdo add. My spanish friends told me it was the dialect of the region and it means "Are you hungry". But I did some research and I found out that I was in Galicia and that was Galician and not Spanish that I've read.

I have the feeling that Spanish people only consider Spanish as the only language of Spain. We had a conversation about Catalan and they said that it will be a dialect until Catalonia is independent. Same goes with Galician and Basque. I mean how can Basque be a dialect of Spanish ?

So I took interest on Galician and Catalan and I concluded that no they are not dialects and they should stop the madness. I think that a Galician for Spanish speakers would be really great !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmartinezrei
jmartinezrei
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You have a wrong feeling. Regional languages are exceptionally well regarded in Spain as compared to, for example, Italy, France or the UK, where there is only an official language and minority languages are not mandatory in school, nor protected at all. In fact, as far as I know, there is no country in the European Union with a higher degree of recognition of regional languages as Spain. All Catalan, Valencian, Balearic, Galician and Basque children have the obligation to learn their languages at school, and every citizen has the right to relate with the administration at their official language.

Ask some Breton, Occitan, Northern Irish or Sardinian about the situation of their languages and compare it with the ones in Spain.

So in fact, most Spanish consider Spanish, Galician, Basque and Catalan as the languages of Spain, as it is recognised by our Constitution.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza
CosmoKaiza
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I don't know if I have the wrong feeling. My friends from Spain (Madrid especially) don't want to say that Catalan or Basque is a language. It was a really intense debate that I had with them about regional languages (such as Catalan).I was trying to defend Catalan and Basque but all my friends were against me, except my Mexican friend who tried to back up my arguments but that was pointless. Maybe it was just them but even my brother who lives in Madrid is convinced that Catalan is a dialect and don't want to listen to me because he lives in spain so he is right. I am sure that people from Galicia learn Galician at school.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmartinezrei
jmartinezrei
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That Catalan and Basque are languages and not dialects is not something disputable or arguable. If somebody defends that they are not is pure ignorance, like if somebody defends evolution is not true.

In any case, it is not the majoritarian position, I doubt that more than 1% of Spanish people would say they are dialects, and most of the ones who do are politically far-righted people.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doktorkampi
doktorkampi
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I don't know if they truely think that are dialects instead of languages. It was a missuse of the term "dialect" during the Franco dictatorship. They talked about the "dialecto catalán", so nowadays some people still use it. But mostly when they want to be disrespectful. They even tell people to speak "en cristiano" (in "Christian") when you speak a language different than Spanish. But I guess that this is a minority thinking movement.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matfran2001
matfran2001
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You are absolutely right!

I have never met a person in Spain that thought Catalan or Basque was a dialect of Spanish (though there may be still some old ignorant people that may think that way).

Spain protects (by law) most of its different languages like no other country.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doktorkampi
doktorkampi
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You are partially right. Valencian children who take the "Castillian school" learn some Valencian but most of them end up the school with no real knowledge of speaking it. Same with Basque. I don't know the situation of Galician. Other languages spoken in Spain like Aragonese or Asturian are almost forgotten in school and are taught as a non-curricular subject. So yes, the situation for the regional languages is better in Spain than in France or Italy, but far from normalized.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EztizenS
EztizenS
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The difference between the linguistic rights of Basque speakers in Hondarribia and Basque speakers in Hendaya is quite big. Sadly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UneJamKuqEZi

I feel like modern Spain is like the old Soviet Union. Not the communism, but the fact that it will break up into many countries. The USSR split into Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. So, I think Spain will split up into New Spain (España Nueva), Catalonia, Basque country, Galicia, and Aragon. But that's just my opinion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmartinezrei
jmartinezrei
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What I see is precisely the opposite. All Europe becoming one single country, as the United States of America.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza
CosmoKaiza
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Europe will never be united. The whole European Union is only a fantasy, an illusion. There are too many cultural differences between the country and they will never be okay with the fact to be one country ruled by one main government. Even Spain has problems to unite their country with two independence movements (Catalonia and the Basque region).

I prefer the fact to be separated but united against a common enemy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmartinezrei
jmartinezrei
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I don't see how cultural differences may prevent a political union. Most of the biggest countries in the world have bigger cultural differences than Europe has.

And Europe is already united. We share the same laws, borders and currency. All that we need is a Government chosen by all European citizens.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JB_The_Towman
JB_The_Towman
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In the soviet union they didnt like being controlled by the soviets, and they were similar to peope in the region. All of europe united would never work

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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My guess is if Spain has to be united in anyway, it shouldn't called "Spain", but "Iberia", that would be more just with the other nations in this country, maybe a "United Kigdom of Iberia", just like we see in the UK of Great-Britain and Northern Ireland, which has many smaller nations inside it : England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Manx. However, to split Spain in smaller countries (Spain, Catalonia, Valencia, Basque Country and maybe Galicia) seems to be a better way for me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundgeirr
Mundgeirr
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Spain comes from Hispania (the whole peninsula), and nowadays it represent almost the whole peninsula (except Portugal) if you would like to divide Spain then it wouldn't be Catalonia, Basque country, Galicia and Spain, because there isn't a Spain within Spain. Spain is the whole. As a Castilian I agree on having a powerful union/country called Spain/Hispania/Iberia whatever, but then having autonomous regions (more than now): Castile, Andalusia, Asturias, León, Extremadura, Basque country, Murcia, Catalonia, Aragón etc. All regions have a distinct culture.

But anyway it's not the place to talk about politics, so I support a galician course here on Duolingo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmartinezrei
jmartinezrei
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I really don't see how that could happen in the near future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EztizenS
EztizenS
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Dialect and minority language are not equivalent terms. If you talked with people who have no idea of even the simplest Linguistics, then that only means they aren't very familiarized with Linguistic concepts, not with their political opinions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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Omg... People who say this doesn't have any sense of the diference between a dialect and a language. Dialect is just a variation of some language. The languages are classified based on linguistic families. Catalan is in the occitano-romance family and Spanish is in the Ibero-romance family, so say that Catalan is a Spanish dialect is exactly equal to say that French (which is in the gallo-romance family) is a Spanish dialect. Galician is a Ibero-romance language in the galician-portuguese subfamily, so say that galician is a Spanish dialect is equal to say that Portuguese is a Spanish dialect. Basque isn't even a Indo-european language, so say that it is a Spanish dialect is literally equal to say that Japanese (no joke) is a Spanish dialect... So... Yeah.

Examples of -real- dialects: Quebecois (French dialect), Brazilian Portuguese (Portuguese dialect), Urdu (Hindustani dialect), Andulusian (Spanish dialect), Valencian (Catalan dialect).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

This is not how language courses get created on Duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7
swingbeatnik7
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A lot of the courses in the incubator had a posting just like this one for Galician. Also, if it isn't, then enlighten us.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EztizenS
EztizenS
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How about you look how it is done? Nadie necesita esclavos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

You have my support. More original languages (Even if they are not from English, possibly even especially if that is the case) are something that will continue to improve the Duolingo diversity and experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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I want it! Get it made!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lea.1717
Lea.1717
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I am portuguese and i love the Galician language (well, i love many the languages...). Gallego and Português have the same ancestor, the Galaico-Portuguese language. I would like to see a Galician course on Duolingo :)

[ just a small correction: Galician was never "portuguese", but both languages came from the same language Galaico-Portugues] Good Luck with your course!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Hi Kreilyn,

A little time ago, I saw in previous forums that making famous the request for creating a new course helps a lot. I don't know if it is completely right

It is right that Duo asks to group all upvotes and comment in one (the first) discussion asking for said course and not to ask a course that has already been asked once.

If you want to make a [course] suggestion, we encourage you to visit the forums and making a search for suggestions that have been made in the past, and adding your vote and comments to those existing posts. That will make the request more popular and make it stand out more, encouraging more people to add their votes. :)

From Help Center: "How can I suggest a new language course?"
Note: Texts in between square brackets are additions of mine.

You'll find for example here a popular discussion about Galician for English speakers where you can add your vote and even comment.

But does it help to see the course sooner be added? Since a lot of courses (and not only for English speakers) have popular discussions asking for them... it is more likely that if Duo doesn't plan by itself to add a course and that nobody asks for it then it'll not be added. So having a popular discussion about a course may help the course to not not being added, I'd say.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olbapz
Olbapz
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I will throw my hat in with this post. Here's some beautiful music from Galicia. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EgpCh7j78g

Luar na Lubre Memoria da Noite - I think is the title. Sometimes you can't tell on youtube.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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Bem, na língua portuguesa a contração do objeto direto com o objeto indireto existe, apesar de não ocorrer na prática (pelo menos aqui no Brasil). Pode-se falar "diga-mo", "faça-lho" ou "entrego-ta" sem problemas. Sou totalmente a favor de um curso de galego, de preferência para falantes de espanhol ou até mesmo português :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Sim, eu já li muitos textos, mas "hoje" é como falar "eu amar-te-ei" ou "hei de amar-te para sempre". ninguém fala.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joao1362
Joao1362
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Eu diria que aqui em Portugal essas contrações são bastante comuns no dia-a-dia. Eu pelo menos diria "Entrego-ta" ou "dou-ta" sem problemas nenhuns :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
Kreilyn
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Uhmm, eu tenho um colega que é de Porto, uma vez eu perguntei se eu poderia dizer "eu quero comprar-to" ou "vamos apresentar-lhas" e ele disse que soa "espanhol". Mas o português que eu aprendi permite as contracções.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JlioGomes1
JlioGomes1
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I agree! You have my support to do it! Duolingo's staff need to add this course!

2 years ago
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