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"Kies skribilo estas tio ĉi?"

Translation:Whose pen is this?

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/.soleil

Skribilo is kind of a cute word...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupladyofficial

It sounds like scribbler!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvelocity
tvelocity
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Why is this not "tiu cxi"? Since a skribilo is a specific thing...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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It's not really about whether it's an identifiable object but about whether it's one out of a group of objects of the same kind.

If you are just pointing to something, you might ask, "Kies skribilo estas tio ĉi?" (Whose pen is this = this thing here?)

But if you see a group of pens and you single out one of them and know it's a pen, then "Kies skribilo estas tiu ĉi?" (= tiu ĉi skribilo) (Whose pen is this one = Whose pen is this pen?) would be more appropriate.

In this case, since you know it's a pen (you're just asking whose it is), "tiu ĉi" would probably make more sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I agree. It should be "tiu ĉi".

This sentence turned up for me in a Google search and it jumped out at me as wrong. I'm going to run this up the flag pole and see what happens.

  • Of all the pens in the world, whose is this one here.

vs

  • From anything that you can possibly imagine, whose pen is this?
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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For what it's worth, in German I think I'd be more likely to say, Wessen Stift ist das hier? (= Kies skribilo estas tio ĉi?) than Wessen Stift ist der hier? (= Kies skribilo estas tiu ĉi?).

At least if there is just one pen lying on the table.

If there were several pens lying on the table and I deliberately pick up one of them, then it might make sense (to me) to identify the pen as "this one" (= this pen) rather than as simply "this" (= this thing).

And in fact, I think I'd have more or less the same distribution in English between "Whose pen is this?" and "Whose pen is this one?"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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"Whose pen is this" means "whose pen is this (pen)" even without an expressed "one".

In any event, other expert speakers have agreed with me here and I've been informed that based on that recommendation, this sentence has been removed from the course.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Wouldn't be the first time that languages do things a bit differently :)

Thank you for checking on the Esperanto aspect.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGXCB

I'm so glad duo has the logo popping up everywhere, instead of fixing basic errors like this one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricxjo_
Ricxjo_
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This drives me nuts. I don't know why I keep mistaking Skribilo for writing. Honestly I would just use Plumo, since it is similar to pluma in spanish and plume in english.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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A plumo is a feather... while those used to be used for writing, they're pretty rare in that use these days.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I say "plumo" for pen.

8 months ago