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https://www.duolingo.com/LovroV

10 language courses at once

LovroV
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I see some people doing up to 10 language courses at the same time so I was wondering how does that work for you? Do you get confused all the time or something and is it bad to learn more than one new language at once?

2 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DougB123
DougB123
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People have different learning styles so some do better with only the same one over and over again while others enjoy the motivation and excitement that comes with the challenge of getting your feet wet with a few more.

I don't see any harm in taking a look at other languages and trying a few lessons to see how you take to it. Some will come easier than others in my experience and yet there are language learning skills you can pick up and naturally develop just by taking a few at the same time.

For me, the beauty of studying several is how more of the world seems to open up because of understanding more of the world's languages. In addition to the languages I'm studying here, I'm also studying Mandarin Chinese and I've signed up to be notified when a few new DuoLingo languages in incubation are ready to be released for beta, but technically I'm only studying nine.

The great thing is, no one can force you to do a certain number of lessons each day in any number of languages. When you study them at your own pace, they'll always be there for you when you're ready to pick them back up again later.

I'm certainly glad I chose to study more than one because of the exposure to the languages that will only serve as a benefit in the future.

There is no law or rule that says you can't travel anywhere in the world you choose physically and likewise, there is no rule to forbid you from allowing your mind to visit and learn different languages.

In my opinion, the knowledge and tools to own it for yourself is here for us and it's completely up to each of us as to how we choose to approach it.

If you decide to explore more than one at a time, it's not like you are blind to the fact and someone pulls a "switcheroo" on you where it takes you by surprise.

You'll go into this adventure and know which one is which language.

If you were worried about mixing up languages, the solution is to simply dedicate some extra "practice" time with that language before moving to more advanced lessons until you are able to beat the clock when you complete the twenty timed practice questions to strengthen that lesson.

Another tip may be to -- approach these languages as your friends, each with their own individual personalities and quirks that make each language unique. This way you don't confuse any of them just like you don't confuse any of your human friends once you meet them and get to know them better.

There are certainly plenty of well crafted arguments, defenses and reasons for either sticking to only one language until you completely master it -- or for exploring several at your own pace.

One of the many great rewards of multiple language learning for me is when I encounter new words in languages that are similar in several. Instead of confusing, I actually find the previous language learning makes it easier and more enjoyable to study a new one.

(What a shame and loss it would have been for me if I had allowed the words of a few who said it wasn't a good idea to study more than one at the same time to discourage me from exploring new ones. I would have needlessly denied myself the opportunity to discover the new worlds within this world and how much smaller and larger the world can seem than before at the same time! Larger because more of it is more understandable and therefore open to me now and smaller for the same reason.)

Who knows?...

You might find learning languages easier than some other people and there's no reason to let anyone talk you out of exploring a few more to really find out for yourself the only way you can know for sure.

I hope this conversation may help you as you consider all the opportunities we have as language learners with DuoLingo and best wishes to you no matter which road or roads you choose to travel on your next chapter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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It is not difficult as people think, it is just not confuse between similar languages, like Portugese, Spanish and Italian, Swedish, Norwegian and Danish. That's it :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LovroV
LovroV
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Well good luck with not confusing 16 languages. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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Thanks ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/centime
centime
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I am maxed-out learning just one new language while retaining my native language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marwill123

I'm learning 4 languages now and I start a new one each two weeks and this way I can get the basics of all these languages. The struggle is to get the time to do all of them each day, well I think 4-5 a day is enough. Good luck and merry Christmas!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lingotgiver
lingotgiver
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Merry Christmas! Have 15 lingots.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muddycat160

That be really difficult

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

I have a lot of language started but I'm only actively working on five of them, with the majority of my time split 70/30 on my top two courses. Some version of this is probably true for other people. But, there are certainly some people who do work seriously on many separate courses at once and I would think then that it's not too confusing if they are unrelated languages. (Working on Spanish, Portuguese and Italian at the same time is pretty rough.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enidkeaner
enidkeaner
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I'm not doing 10, but I am doing multiple and it's honestly not as difficult to keep them separate as one might think. I do notice that I do tend to go days focusing on certain languages at the expense of others, but it's not too bad.

I find it helpful to learn multiple languages at once as it keeps me from getting bored and I find that it keeps my mind primed for language learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italianboy96
italianboy96
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Even though I'm learning 3 langs at once (Latin, Esperanto, and Spanish) it's not too difficult. The only problem is that you can sometimes mix words but besides that, it's not overly difficult. Even though Duolingo says I'm learning five, I'm not very interested in Italian (took it for school), I'm only experimenting with Turkish, and I've unfourtnely put French on the sidelines.

EDIT: Apparently Turkish isn't coming up but I'm am learning it on Duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

Impressive, Latin/Spanish/Esperanto are all very similar in some ways. I know a teeny tiny bit of Spanish and when I was first learning Esperanto it was really messing with me. It still does occasionally.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7
swingbeatnik7
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Yay :) yes it should be encouraged more

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avrichard
avrichard
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I get confused between similar languages. For example, I wouldn't try to learn Spanish and Italian at the same time as a beginner... Pick one, and get at least halfway fluent in that, before you attempt the other.

But other people seem ok with that.

Some of the Duolingo languages I'm not actively learning - I just took the placement test and was able to clear half the tree using knowledge from other languages I can already speak. For example, I spent some time learning the Danish tree, then took the Norwegian and Swedish placement tests basically just answering in Danish. I obviously wasn't perfect, but with some educated guesses I tested out of quite a few skills.

I've been a recreational language learner for a long time. I am a native English speaker (Australian), and teach German, French and Chinese at high school level. Also took Russian and Spanish at university (early 2000s), and REALLY wish duolingo had existed back then.

The Russian course I did at university was really old-school... Lots of grammar, no development of conversational skills. The Spanish course was much better. So was more fluent after 1 year of Spanish classes than after 3 years of Russian classes.

Have developed more conversational Russian ability in a few weeks of Duolingo than in the whole of the time I was taking classes.

Also learnt a little Greek (started with the Pimsleur audio course, then practice with Greeks here... there are a lot of Greeks in Australia, especially Melbourne). I also know basic Japanese from my time at high school also, it's a common language in Australian schools.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyglotED
olyglotED
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Confusion < Fascination. Never stop learning, that's the trick.

2 years ago