"They are going home."

Translation:One idą do domu.

December 24, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AdamMlodoz

So it's 'domu' because inanimate masculine nouns take an '-u' ending in the genitive?

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/luless

Not every noun does that: ołowek - ołówka (pencil), komputer-komputera (computer). But in many cases that is true.

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/neio75

maybe it depends on what letter the noun ends on?

October 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/IvarionScribe

So are "One" and "Oni" interchangeable? Or does one signify a group of men and one a group of women?

January 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

You're close. "Oni" means, that in the group there is at least one male human being. "One", for everything else. It shows that there is no male human being in the group.

Theoretically "one" could denote not only women/girls, but also boxes, cats or trees. In fact, it is really rarely used to denote something else than people (you just specify the subject, usually), so it's safe assume that's a group of women-only.

January 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IvarionScribe

This is awesome. Thank you so much!

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisFlynn12

I thought it was 'domu' because it is in locative as it refers to a location?

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Usually it would be, but not with "do". "do" needs Genitive. Which is the same in this example, but then you'd have "Idę do szkoły" (Genitive) and "Jestem w szkole" (Locative).

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ToddPhillips

What's the difference between chodz,a and id,a (can't do the polish characters). Well, really the two verbs in general because I don't know infinitives yet. Does one mean walk and the other go? They don't seem to be straight forward based on the sentences I have seen this far.

Thanks

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

"chodzą" (infinitive: chodzić) means: to go, to walk (generally, habitually) and sometimes also "to be going" (right now, but without any direction and purpose)

"idą" (infinitive: iść) means: to be going, to be walking (right now, with some direction)

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ToddPhillips

So, I understand that with longer sentences where there is more context, it could be easily chosen which word to use, but with short little sentences like "I go" or "I walk", is it fair to say that either verb could work?

December 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Both "I go" and "I walk" should be "(Ja) chodzę", as Present Simple implies that it's happening generally, habitually.

"I am going" and "I am walking" are obviously right now, so "(Ja) idę".

The only more difficult situation is when "I am walking" is basically the whole sentence (not "I am walking to school"), then it can be "Chodzę". It's like "Oh, I am just walking around..."

January 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Auste552290

czego do domu a nie do chaty?

February 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Well, "chata" is either a totally colloquial word for "house"... or it's literally a "shack".

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JeiJeiR

Isn't this "they are walking home"?

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Yeah, it could be, it works.

April 5, 2018
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