"Hunden vår pleier å være snill."

Translation:Our dog tends to be kind.

December 24, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993

How to tell if pleier means (usually) or (tends)?

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

"å pleie å X" deals with habit, and can usually be translated as either "usually" or "tends to", since if you have a habit of doing something you also have a tendency toward doing it.

"å pleie" can also be used in the sense of 'taking care of', in which case it can also be translated to "tend to", but with another meaning than in the above. As you see, this version of "å pleie" is used on its own rather than as a modifier of another verb, so it's not followed by a second infinitive mark (å):

"Sykepleieren pleier de syke."
"The nurse tends to the ill."

From my example above, you can see that our word for "nurse" is formed using this verb, literally referring to someone who takes care of the ill.

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hmada993

this is beautiful, thanks for clarifying

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

Bare hyggelig! :)

December 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtyomBondartsov

Can one also say "hunden vår bruker å være snill" instead? Because I remember someone here said that "å bruke å ..." also means something like "to tend to ...". Unless I'm mistaken, it was "Han bruker å bruke hammeren til å slå ting med" sentence

August 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

Yes, they both see frequent use. I believe most Eastern dialects have a preference for "å pleie å", but neither would sound out of place.

November 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtyomBondartsov

Takk for forklaringen din!

November 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

We have this word in old English. To Ply: verb (used with object), plied, plying.

<pre>to work with or at diligently; employ busily; use: ... to carry on, practice, or pursue busily or steadily: ... to treat with or apply to (something) repeatedly (often followed by with): ... to assail persistently: ... to supply with or offer something pressingly to: </pre>
November 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/neutronsoup

Ok this is a very basic grammat question but could one say "vår hund pleier å være snill"? Or does that sound weird?

February 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
  • 212

It's more common to put the possessive after the noun, unless you want to emphasize the ownership. So it would be more natural to say 'hunden vår' in most cases. 'vår hund' isn't incorrect. but it should be used in situations where you need to emphasize that it's your dog.

February 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/chelsea162395

What is the word for word of this?

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 163

"The dog (of) ours tends to be kind."

November 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Christian.920

What does "være" mean?

December 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MefromME

I don't know how helpful this is but Å være is the infinitive of the verb "to be". What weirds me out is describing a dog as being "kind" but that's what I love about duolingo. Some of the translations are not intuitive.

December 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

Reminds me of the phrase that NEVER is to be taken on trust "Oh, he wouldn't hurt a flea!"

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtyomBondartsov

Ahah! I've heard that before: "Не бойся, она не кусается!". If you hear that in russian,. don't trust it either :)

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyLowings

I find sometimes it is so odd, I learn something and then it turns up in a book ten minutes later! I read this yesterday then got into all kinds of trouble trying to say " I am USED to finding it difficult sometimes" ( å bli vant til)

September 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven

A dog "tending" to kindness is an odd concept in English. It would make more sense to say "is usually gentle."

February 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Annette0T4EvTJn

Yes, I know that “snill” literally translates as “kind” but that makes for an odd translation when referring to a dog. It’s frustrating that Duolingo often does not use literal translations, yet here I believe “friendly” is a better translation to describe a dog, but that was not accepted.

January 21, 2018
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