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  5. "Nie lubisz tej koszuli?"

"Nie lubisz tej koszuli?"

Translation:Do you not like this shirt?

December 25, 2015

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniePl

Since "koszula" is fem., does it decline as "kobieta"? And if that's right, then the genitive form "koszuli" ends with -i , and not with an -y, because l is a soft consonant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scanatron

"Do you not like this shirt?" sounds unnatural. A more natural English sentence with a similar meaning would be "Don't you like this shirt?" or, for a little different meaning, "You don't like this shirt?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DireDragynski

"Do you not..." sounds completely natural to me, albeit a little old-fashioned or like in a fantasy. I say it a lot of the time with people I talk to, as do they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scanatron

Thanks for the reply. "Do you not" and "Don't you" aren't synonymous to me. "Do you not like" implies that they don't like it already, whereas "Don't you like" implies that they do already like it. They're two very different sentences and I feel that "do you not" is useful in fewer situations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paula531833

It sounds very stilted...not natural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y_ddraig_las

It's natural to me, 'Don't you' sounds a little odd to me. It's just English dialectical variation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FWCKt8T3

I'm American, and I would say "Don't you" is much more common than "Do you not." The difference in meaning is conveyed by the tone of voice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7Bach

"Do you not ..." is quite normal in Scotland, too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dont_tread_on_me

Why is it genitive, because of the negation? Shouldn't it be accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew_Phelps

Correct. Though it was not stated by any tips or notes, the object of a verb in a negated sentence is genitive, as opposed to accusative.

Ex: koszula

-> Lubisz koszulę. (accusative)

-> Nie lubisz koszuli. (genitive)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dont_tread_on_me

awesome, thx for the help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/94BlueLane

Why? Just why??!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anetagh

I tried to think of a smart way to explain it and I've failed :( Just to cheer you up - quite a few Poles have problems with Genitive/Accusative distinction, especially when it comes to masculine nouns. In my opinion in several hundred years the accusative will cease to exist :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mihxal

Actually, it seems to go otherwise. More and more inanimate nouns which have unmarked Accusative, that is Accusative = Nominative, start to behave like animate nouns, thus have Accusative marked similarly to animate nouns, that is Accusative = Genitive.

On the other hand, feminine nouns have Accusative form clearly different than Genitive and it doesn't seem to change.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anetagh

Well, I am not so sure. I keep getting spam like this: "Przestałaś nosić sukienek z powodu żylaków?" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hummingbird_

Wait. What?!?! Holy Batman... Could this be my missing link? Is the "genitive case applies to negation" rule just for Polish? Or did I also miss it in all the other classes I've taken? This would explain so much. MIND = BLOWN


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Which other classes did you take?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Don't take it too far. Negated Accusative results in Genitive. It's not like any negation implies Genitive. You can read more about it here: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/28545847


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelioFM

YES, dont_tread_on_me:

In Polish, every negative word requires the use of the genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hummingbird_

CelioFM... do all Slavic languages have this rule?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

It used to be in Russian but it's not anymore. Russian has some situations that still have negative genitives but otherwise it's archaic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelioFM

Hummingbird:

Polish does have this rule. About other slavic languages, I don´t know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

In Israel, Polish mothers have the reputation of Jewish mothers elsewhere. There’s a joke about a Polish mother who buys her son a red shirt and a blue shirt, so if she sees him wearing the red one she can say, ‘I knew you wouldn’t like the blue one…’ and vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sirwootalot

A huge portion of the Jewish Mothers so famous in NYC have their roots in Poland!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YariMsika

Haha I didn't know Jewish mothers had a reputation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CelioFM

The interesting and elucidating comment of BenYoung84 does not appear here, why? BenYoung84 wrote on "Nie lubisz tej koszuli?": Sure. The following are correct: Do you not like this shirt? Don't you like this shirt? Can she not help me? Can't she help me? Are they not listening? Aren't they listening? But if a contraction isn't used, it is incorrect to put "not" before the subject instead of after (like in the examples above). The following sentences are incorrect: Do not you like this shirt? Can not she help me? Cannot she help me? Are not they listening?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/germanmum

You do not like this shirt?? doesn't work because why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It's an accepted answer, it should have worked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoitaliano

How would you ask "Do you not like THAT shirt?"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"Nie lubisz tamtej koszuli?"

Although actually, "that" already works here. Forms of [ten/ten/tamten] are more or less equivalent to [this/that/that], so the middle forms overlap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

Scanatron said:

"Thanks for the reply. "Do you not" and "Don't you" aren't synonymous to me. "Do you not like" implies that they don't like it already, whereas "Don't you like" implies that they do already like it. They're two very different sentences and I feel that "do you not" is useful in fewer situations."

Despite this, I can´t grasp this subtle difference, to the point of "Don't you like" be considered as wrong ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"Don't you like this shirt?" should have been accepted, it works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnesh1

Don't worry, this makes no sense to me either. If they already like it, they wouldn't express dislike for it, and there would be no reason to say to them "Don't you like it?" Both versions are perfectly acceptable and completely interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reallygross

I also think they're different, do you not is more pessimistic. Don't you like it = you like it, right. Do you not like it = you don't like it, do you. I wouldn't be surprised if those extra connotations aren't there everywhere, but that's definitely how they're used where I'm from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

No, there isn't a difference in meaning between the two, except that "Do you not" sounds a bit stuffy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sujitkulkarni

When do I use tej and te?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

sujitkulkarni:

Ta koszula = This shirt (nominative) Kupiłem tę koszulę = I bought this shirt (direct object accusative) Nie kupiłem tej koszuli = I didn't buy this shirt (genitive required because of the negative word NIE).

In the plural it would be:

These shirts = Te koszule (nominative) I bought these shirts = Kupiłem te koszule (direct object accusative) I didn't buy these shirts = Nie kupiłem tych koszul (genitive required because of the negative word "didn't").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyLynxcat

This is me showing metal bands shirts to my non-metalhead friends lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"koszula" is rather a buttoned shirt, a t-shirt like your band shirts is "koszulka", so here: "Nie lubisz tej koszulki?" :)

Although that sentence is rather about a shirt that you own but somehow don't like. You'd rather ask your friend about their aesthetic view of your shirt: "Nie podoba ci się ta koszula?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamHaaland13

Why can't it be: Do u not lik dis shirt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

What language is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matthewczyz

why is it not "Nie lubisz ta koszule?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

The positive sentence "Lubisz tę koszulę" takes Accusative. It is "tę" in Accusative, not "tą", although using "tą" here is probably the most common mistake made by natives.

Then if we negate the sentence, Accusative turns into Genitive. Therefore: "Nie lubisz tej koszuli".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xenooon

It's wrong to say "do you not like..." It should be "do not you like..." Because when we ask "do you like" do is at the beginning,and "not" is a part that always goes with "do" or "is" if it's a negative sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

No that is just not how English works. When there is subject-verb inversion for a question, the negation "not" is not inverted, unless the verb is contracted because then the negation and the verb are inseparable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

Dear BenYoung84: It would be very useful, at least for me, if you give some example (s) of practical application of the norms that you exposed, saying explicitly which is right and which is wrong. Grateful. Celio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Sure. The following are correct:

Do you not like this shirt?
Don't you like this shirt?
Can she not help me?
Can't she help me?
Are they not listening?
Aren't they listening?

But if a contraction isn't used, it is incorrect to put "not" before the subject instead of after (like in the examples above). The following sentences are incorrect:

Do not you like this shirt?
Can not she help me?
Cannot she help me?
Are not they listening?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

Thank you very much!

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