"Anna und Lukas kommen aus Deutschland."

Translation:Anna and Lukas come from Germany.

December 26, 2015

69 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatheusFRib

Is "come from" in this meaning born there or arriving from somewhere?

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pfiff

It can mean both, although without context I would assume they were born there.

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJdeklerk

Why is it 'kommen' and not kommt

February 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nurgie

Ich kommE - "I come" or "I am coming"

Du kommST - "You come" or "You are coming"

Er/Sie/Es kommT - "He/She/It comes" or "He/She/It is coming"

Wir kommEN - "We come" or "We are coming"

Ihr kommT - "You(plural) come" or "You(plural) are coming"

Sie kommEN - "They come" or "They are coming"

Sie kommEN - "You(formal) come" or "You(formal) are coming"

April 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INDRAJITSAHA

So why Anne & Lucas are considered as "Sie kommen" rather than "Ihr kommt"?

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's sie kommen (small sie = they come) not Sie kommen (big Sie = you come).

ihr kommt would also be "you come".

Anna and Lucas come = they come.

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Couldn't Sie kommen refer to the plural formal you as well?

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes; it's formal you whether singular or plural.

But if you want to say "Anna and Lukas, you are coming", then you would set off "Anna und Lukas" with a comma, as in English: *Anna und Lukas, Sie kommen."

(Also, in general you wouldn't call people Sie that you address by their first name, but there are exceptions: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger_Sie )

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Danke, mizinamo.

I think I shall add "unfamiliar" (in the sense of not having a close relationship) as a connotation to Sie, along with "formal" and "polite". It makes sense to me that way, especially in light of how it makes me uncomfortable when people I don't know behave as if we are quite familiar with one another. E.g., cashier's calling me by my first name, waiters sitting down at my table to discuss the day's specials, hugs from someone I just met, etc, etc.

I suppose that's my German/Prussian heritage cropping up.

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akhileshpa28913

I m satisfyd

June 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EasterDomi

because "kommen" is prural and "kommt" is for singular.

sample: Peter kommt aus Brasilien. Peter und Petra kommen aus Brasilien.

March 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HobberDK

Heil is that something? never heard that in English

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

"Anna and Lukas hail from Germany" is an alternative translation. It will only show up if you enter an incorrect translation like "comes" instead of "come" and the system can't figure out what you were trying to write. It will attempt to show you a correct translation which is close to what you entered. Unfortunately, it's not very good at that. One criterion appears to be word length. Whenever something like this happens, double-check your grammar and spelling.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hail_from#English

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/hail-from

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hail#h4

August 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

You've never heard hail or Heil ?

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HobberDK

Like the german word "heil" as in Nazi Germany ofc, but Heil as in something before from, no. I had to write: "Anna and Lukas Heil from Germany". In my Very decent english understanding such a word is not commonly used. However i might be wrong ofc. I assume its a troll or something

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

What you mean is "hail" (link here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hail#Verb_2) not Heil (link here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Heil#Noun) which doesn't really have anything more to do with Nazi Germany than any of the rest of the German language.

But you're right, "hail" is not commonly used.

May 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumukhpuro

Why came from is wrong?

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JabezSS

It's in the past

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conner643234

Why is "Lukas and Anna come from Germany" considered wrong?

November 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

The wrong order. Should be Anna and Lukas come from Germany.

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MunaKumar

Does this sentence can be translated like this- Anna and Lukas are coming from Germany.?

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/famroy

Why do I hear the sound "ch" between 'und' and 'Lukas'? Is it well pronounced?

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sssheridan

I'm 95% sure that's just the robot tripping up

April 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNameIsGAM

That is because when the letter “d” in the German alphabet is the last letter of the word, it sounds as the letter “t” in the English alphabet.

Examples:

und (sounds like unt) - and Hund (sounds like hunt) - Dog Leid (sounds like layt) - suffering Deutschland (sounds like doych-lant) - Germany

When it is found at the start or middle of the word, it has the same pronunciation as in the letter “d” in the english alphabet.

http://joycep.myweb.port.ac.uk/pronounce/consond.html

December 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JabezSS

It's like 'd' sounds in 'und'

April 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yahisone

I acccidentaly typed fo instead of from and it said I got it wrong. it should have said you have a typo in your answer

September 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

And how is die Eule to know that you didn't accidentally type "fo" instead of "of"? Or "for"?

The simplest solution is to be more careful and not expect your errors to be overlooked.

Admit and accept your mistakes. Learn from them. Don't make them again. We all make them, but that doesn't mean they need to be ignored.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yahisone

your right

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Der-Michael

*You're

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anandrkanekal

Can someone explain me about the word "aus"? I couldn't understand the meaning

May 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aryamaan008

Aus means from

June 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Why not Ann and Luke come from Germany?

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Der-Michael

Because the names aren't "Ann" and "Luke". You can't just change the names, even if those names aren't common in the other language.

March 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

OK

March 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark958555

Although in other languages on Duolingo, we are expected or allowed to translate or transliterate. (Ελήνι is accepted as Eleni or Helen; יוסי wants "Yossi", even though there is clearly only one s in Hebrew; Marta in Polish is accepted as either Martha or Marta, and so on.)

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CATS52

deutschland is the same as germany why am i wrong??

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, they're not the same.

One is a German word, the other is an English word.

You'd have been marked wrong for Allemagne or Đức or ドイツ as well.

Use the English name of the country when writing an English sentence, and the German name of the country when writing a German sentence.

Things are different for modern people: Anna und Lukas will usually stay "Anna and Lukas" rather than turning into "Anne and Luke".

But many countries and some cities have different names in different languages, so München should turn into "Munich", for example, but a smaller place such as Seevetal stays "Seevetal" and doesn't turn into "Seevevale".

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INDRAJITSAHA

Can this be translated to "Anna & Lucas are from Germany"?

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Maybe.

I'm not a course maintainer and don't know whether they decide to accept it or not.

If in doubt, stick with the direct translations kommen aus D = "come from G" and sind aus D = "are from G".

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PoodlePuppo

Would it be acceptable for a person learning German to refer to proper nouns as their form in his or her original language? I suppose the question's root being: Is Deutschland an actual word in German that would not be understood in it's English form, and would it be considered rude or lazy for a English speaker to refer to Germany as such?

March 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Deutschland is a word in German. Many German speakers might understand the word "Germany" because they speak English -- but not all German speakers do. A bit like how German speakers might understand the word "horse" or "dog", but when you're speaking German, you'd be better off using the German words, Pferd and Hund.

Would you know which country a Korean speaker refers to with Miguk? That's America. Which of those two names would be more appropriate in an English-language sentence, do you think? "I have not been to Miguk before." or "I have not been to America before."

Or from a Japanese who is speaking English, would it be better to say "I will visit Igirisu next week." or "I will visit England next week."

I'm not sure whether "rude" or "lazy" would be the correct words; I think "wrong" and perhaps "impedes communication" would fit it better.

"Acceptable" is also tricky. If you're learning a language, you're bound to make mistakes, so those are often accepted. It's still a mistake, though.

Learning the correct words is part of learning the language.

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anjar_Husain

Is 'kommen' taken as 'comes' in English? The answer recommends 'Anna and Lucas hail from Germany'. But I think it should also accept 'Anna and Lucas comes from Germany'. Please correct me if I am wrong cause I am fairly new on learning Deutsch.

May 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"Anna and Lucas" are two people.

We don't say "they comes" but instead "they come". So "Anna and Lucas come from Germany" could be accepted, but "Anna and Lucas comes" is wrong.

May 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaysterooster

i dont understand i got this wrong because komma for some reason means hail what does hail even mean

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Komme (not "komma") does not mean "hail", but rather "come". "Kommen aus" means "come from", and that is what "hail" means.

You might find an online dictionary/resource, such as Wiktionary or dict.cc to be helpful, although in this case, neither make it terribly obvious how "hail" is used in the sense of "kommen aus".

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaysterooster

cool thank gave u 2 lingots

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeyHarve

It told me the correct answer was Anna and Lukas hail Germany. Think someone at Duolingo thinks that's a funny joke or something? Lol

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

" . . . hail FROM Germany". Not a joke, just another valid translation.

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yalda13728

what is "hail"? I never heard it before and why "comes from" is wrong?

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

One cannot use "comes from" because the verb must be conjugated to match the subject in number.

  • Plural: He and she come from . . . .
  • Singular: He comes from . . . .

As far as "hail": that question has been asked and answered. You should always read through the comments to find out if your question has already been addressed.

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yalda13728

Thank you , some times it's really hard for me as I'm not good at English. specially grammar.O﹏o

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SPNKenzy

Do they mean that they are from Germany? Or that they came(are coming) from Germany? Can it also mean both?

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Beide.

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LupinRaedwulf

So "kommen" means "come" in one sentence and in the next it means "hail"? How is someone who is a beginner learner supposed to know these things. I think there needs to be a section where it expands on things like this.

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

There is a section about this, and you have stumbled right into it: here, this discussion page.

If you will read through the comments, you will find several threads that discuss this question and one that specifically addresses how it is "kommen aus" which means "hail from".

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lili699284

Hmm why cant it be "comes from" but hail

August 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It can't be "comes from" because "Anna and Lukas" are two people.

So you would need to say "come from", like "they come from" -- not "comes from" like "she comes from".

August 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aditya848978

I think it can be " Anna and Lukas comes from Germany".

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Nein. Es kann nicht.

"Anna and Lukas" is a compound subject, i.e., plural. The verb must agree in number, and thus must be "come", with no -s. Anna comes from Germany. Lukas comes from Germany. Together, though, they come from Germany.

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FamousLiveGamer

REMEBER!

kommen aus : are from komme aus : am from

December 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pontus528829

Pretty sure it should be comes from and not hail....

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, "they comes" is not correct English, nor is "Anna and Lukas comes".

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/falco-8

oh, come on!! I wrote: "Ana and Lucas are from Germany" - and it's wrong?!?! Duo coloured word Ana in red, like: THIS IS WRONG!! I missed a "n" in name, what kind of error it that? I'm not native English speaker, my sister's name is Ana so I just wrote that automatically :( I don't think this should be a mistake!! :(

December 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

You also misspelled "Lukas", falko-ate.

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yahisone

yes i agree it does get annoying sometimes. what it should say is "you got a typo in your answer." not"you got it wrong" ;-)

September 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Or one could welcome the opportunity to have more practice by answering the question a second time, taking care to be correct.

September 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarisNazri

why am i getting "hail from germany"? I thought it was "comes from"

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"comes from" is wrong because "Anna and Lukas" are two people, so you cannot use the verb form for "he" or "she"; you have to use the verb form for "they": "they come" and so "Anna and Lukas come".

June 13, 2017
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