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"They do not help their colleagues."

Translation:One nie pomagają swoim koleżankom.

December 26, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashibaal

"Nie pomagają swoim kolegom" is not accepted! Reported. Favouring the use of personal pronouns is not very clever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel_Barahona

Not a native, but shouldn't it be "nie pomagają swoich kolegom" because "kolegom" is masculine-personal plural? I might be wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarjanvanK

what is the difference in this case between < ich > and< swoim > ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"ich": They (Susan and Bart) do not help their (Martha and Steve's) colleagues.

"swoim": They (Susan and Bart) do not help their (own) colleagues.

Any form of "swój" always refers back to the subject of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarjanvanK

thanks ! I suspected something like that, but I was not sure. Now I am


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlisonSinc

But isn't this more likely to be the second case here, ie a comment on how S and B don't help their (own) colleagues. We don't know anything about those of Martha and Steve....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"swoim" does sound a lot more probable. I guess there's no point in keeping "ich" as one of the starred answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J_Rzesiewicz

When do you use swoich? What woupd be an example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

why is this not correct? Oni nie pomagają swojemu kolegom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"swojemu" is for masculine singular. For plural (luckily here, both plurals) you need "swoim".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia394440

"Swoim" is correct,

On nie pomaga swojemu koledze./ Oni nie pomagają swoim kolegą.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

*swoim kolegom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanuszWoro3

Does "swoim współpracownikom" work here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Yes, it does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMlodoz

Why is this dative case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithStanley

You help (give help) to a person, so it's the indirect object. It's the same in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianH71

So here, the verb's demand for the dative overrules the "nie"s demand for the genitive? Is that the case for all verbs that demand a certain case (e.g. być)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

nie's demand for genitive works only for accusative. All other cases stay the same.

Also it does not change a case after preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darth_Elven

Dalczego "kolegom", a nie "kolegam"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602
    • dlaczego
  1. 'Kolegam' nie istnieje

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hot-Doggy

Can the Polish noun "kolega" also mean "mate" or "buddy"? If so, "mates" and "buddies" should be included as correct answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"buddies" worked already, added "mates".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Aliyev

Swoich vs Swoim. Hello, but shouldn't it be "nie pomagają swoich kolegom" because "kolegom" is masculine personal plural? This question drives me to the wall. Can you please give me a short explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

The words "swoich kolegom" do not match each other grammatically.

OK, "koledzy" is a masculine personal plural noun, true. Now, let's look at the verb: "pomagać" (to help) takes an indirect object (the 'receiver' of the action of helping) in Dative case.

Now, you either recognize the patterns well enough already or you can check on Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kolega#Polish), that the Dative plural form of "koledzy" is indeed "kolegom".

Now, let's see the same for "swój", remembering that it refers to a 'macsuline personal plural' noun. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sw%C3%B3j#Declension_2 shows that the Dative form for both plurals is "swoim".

"swoich" is just the wrong case here, being either Genitive or Accusative.

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