"Chłopcy jedzą ciasteczka."

Translation:The boys are eating cookies.

December 26, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cstonebr17

I love that "cookies" was like the third food word we learned. The Polish course has its priorities straight.

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rimdus

In British English are biscuits?

November 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Yes, more or less the same.

November 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Beanybadger

I like your fieldfare. Fun fact: In Swedish it is a björktrast, meaning 'birch thrush'.

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CristinKoc

Ciasteczka is singular isn't it? Shouldn't the translation be "a cookie" not "cookies?"

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Latcarf

It can be either genitive singular or accusative/nominative plural. Here it's a direct object of the verb jeść which requires the accusative case, so it's plural.

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kozjol

is nominative plural always genitive singular?

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

It is common for neuter nouns, but even then it's not 'all of them'. But most of those that don't end with -ę in singular Nominative, seem to have those two forms you mentioned identical.

July 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Grendel88

You also find a similar trend in Latin.

August 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PonyDesu

It's plural.

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Skapata

Ciasteczka is the plural of ciasteczko. Both forms are both nominative and accusative. Ciasteczka can also be the genitive singular.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ciasteczko

August 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bnolet

Ci and cz both make the English ch as in chip sound?

November 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Ci (ć) and cz are totally different sounds for a Polish ear. "cz" could be transcribed as English "ch" (tsch), but ć is palatalized c. The palatalized sounds are difficult to pronounce for a non-native, people also have trouble even perceiving the difference. But they are definitely not the same.

November 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Grendel88

It's easier if you think of the former as having a half-hearted 'y' sound immediately following. Your tongue should be touching your palate when you articulate. Think of the difference between the 'l' in 'light' and the 'l' in 'pull'. All Slavic languages make this distinction between 'soft' and 'hard' consonants; so does Irish, but in Irish it's called 'slender' and 'broad'.

August 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rainbow912406

How on earth are we meant to learn all the cases for all the nouns DX

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EmirNazl

I can't write it

October 4, 2017
Learn Polish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.