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  5. "Komórki mają baterie."

"Komórki mają baterie."

Translation:Cellphones have batteries.

December 27, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothernobody

Why is it not "baterii"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngfio

With "mają" and with "nie mają" you use different cases: "Komórki mają baterie. Komórki nie mają baterii."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothernobody

I should probably know this, but are they both Genitive? Or does "to have" make something Accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerardd88

Genitive always replaces accusative in negative sentences. That's why it's very common in Polish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngfio

If the forms of the nouns are different, then they are in different cases (but not the other way round: some verbs can have the same form in different cases); "mieć" goes with accusative, "nie mieć" goes with genitive (see https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bateria#Polish)...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wiktorka234

Popraw mnie jeśli nie mam racji, ale czy "komórki" mogą też oznaczać "cells" w ciele człowieka?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okcydent

Komórka, to mała komora. Ta ostatnia to pewnego rodzaju pomieszczenie. Nazwa komórka jest stosowana na oznaczenie komórek w ciele człowieka (cells). Ponadto telefon komórkowy (cell phone) w codziennym języku skraca się do samego tylko słowa komórka.

Samo cell bierze się z łacińskiego cella, gdzie oznacza ono komorę, pomieszczenie a skąd zostało zapożyczone do języka angielskiego.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanLania

Do people really say 'batteria' and not 'akumulator?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

"bateria" is generally a battery like the ones you use everyday. And the one in your phone.

"akumulator" is a rechargeable battery. And yes, obviously the battery in a cell phone is rechargeable, but I wouldn't call it like that and I don't remember hearing it. "akumulator" is either in your car, or it's a battery that you could recharge like in this photo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanLania

Clear. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alisa488338

When we speak in generl we may use nouns in plural without articles but if speak concreatly we must yse the article " the"/ This situation is unknown for us


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denny569527

I'm a bit confused here about this sentence being plural. How would the singular sentence look like and why is it wrong here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

When saying singular, do you mean "A cellphone has a battery" or "Cellphones have a battery"?

The first one is "Komórka ma baterię". The latter - "Komórki mają baterię", so there's only one letter of change: e->ę.

Well... it's a logical sentence, I'd say it's semantically correct (not like all cellphones share a battery, but they have one battery per cellphone), but technically it's not a translation of the English sentence with plural "batteries".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/george674494

I have been doing this for 3 years and I know what accusative and genitive mean but does one have to learn what the ending is for every Polish noun or say does every word end in say "u" for a particular case. I just write what feels right. English nouns are so much easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

There are definitely patterns, even if there are many of them. That's what makes you 'write what feels right', I guess. True, English nouns are definitely easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/george674494

Ok . Thanks for your patience. Jurek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anklefoot

Can't I use 'mobile' instead of 'cellphone'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

Yes, just make it plural ("mobiles").

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