https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

The Whistling Language

{@style=color: green} Recently, I was skimming through a magazine, and came across this very interesting article about the Whistling Language. Unfortunately, I could not find the same article on the web. I myself have never heard of this and thought I would share it with the Duolingo Community.

I do not take any credit for this article as it is in no way my words at all. This article was written by somebody else. I do not know who.

Enjoy reading! {@style=background-image: -webkit-gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );background-image: gradient( linear, left top, right top, color-stop(0, #f22), color-stop(0.15, #f2f), color-stop(0.3, #22f), color-stop(0.45, #2ff), color-stop(0.6, #2f2),color-stop(0.75, #2f2), color-stop(0.9, #ff2), color-stop(1, #f22) );color:transparent;-webkit-background-clip: text;background-clip: text;}

Deep in the mountains of Turkey, a piercing whistle sounds. The whistler makes the noise using his fingers, tongue, and teeth. To a non-native, the signal sounds like birdsong. But to a member of the village of Kuskoy, it means, "Do you have fresh bread?" A scientist named Onur Güntürkün traveled to the village of Kuskoy to study the "bird language." The language is based on Turkish words. That means the whistled tones don't work like a code a computer could follow. Instead, they work like a real language. In a normal, spoken language, words can mean more than one thing. People can use the word bank to mean place where monkey is kept safe. But they can also use it to mean mound of land beside a river. Words can also be used to mean things that aren't literal. If someone says, "It's going to rain cats and dogs!" you wouldn't expect cats and dogs to tumble from the sky. You'd just wait for rain to fall very hard. Most people can understand those difficulties of language. In fact, it's usually easy for them! But if your computer's code were written that way with one symbol that meant two very different things, you'd have a seriously confused machine on your hands. Did you know that you use the left side of your brain when you use language? Usually the right half interprets music. But Mr. Güntürkün's studies showed him something surprising. The natives of Kuskoy use both sides of their brains when they hear their whistled language. Mr. Güntürkün's discoveries showed him two things. First, the way our brains work is still a mystery! Second, learning more about whistled languages could teach us how to help people who have had strokes or other brain damage. In 1736, a doctor named Olaf Dalin treated a young man who could no longer speak. But then the man started singing hymns in church! His right brain worked even though his left brain didn't. Singing songs helps some people learn how to speak again. Now scientists want to know: Can bird languages do the same thing?

Here is a video link that will explain more. https://youtu.be/bQf38Ybo1IY

3 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje
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There is one in Spain too on the Canary Islands, Silbo Gomero.

According to Wikipedia:

Silbo Gomero (Spanish: silbo gomero [ˈsilβo ɣoˈmeɾo], 'Gomeran whistle'), also known as el silbo ('the whistle'), is a whistled register of Spanish used by inhabitants of La Gomera in the Canary Islands to communicate across the deep ravines and narrow valleys that radiate through the island. It enables messages to be exchanged over a distance of up to 5 kilometres. Due to this loud nature, Silbo Gomero is generally used in circumstances of public communication. Messages conveyed could range from being an event invitation to being public information advisories. [..] Silbo Gomero is a transposition of Spanish from speech to whistling.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Interesting. I hadn't heard of the one in Spain. I just found about this language yesterday. Thanks for sharing that!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje
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De nada :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
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There are some articles about it on BBC news, for instance, this one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Thank you very much for that! Very interesting! Those children may not realize it, but they are privileged to learn the whistling language!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje
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That's where I first heard of it! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Man! I feel left out. I never heard of it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/het_aapje
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You have now I guess :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Yeah....I guess. xD

I wonder what other unheard-of, unique languages such as this one are out there.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrazyKaderKat

Wow! that is just positively Amazing! i have never even heard about the Whistling Langauge before Today!

thank you MissThorson for sharing this!!

Whistling Language

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

It IS definitely amazing! You're welcome! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KrazyKaderKat

^_^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowlalexa

So cool!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Yes, it is. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowlalexa

by the way how did u do the color changing thingy?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Oh, I did not come up with that, Hyllning did. :)

Click here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truelefty
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That's sooo interesting!

Imagine a Duolingo course for it :O

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

A Duolingo course for a Whistling Language?! That would truly be awesome! The only thing is, {{blushing}}, (I can't whistle...)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleowlalexa

We should totally bribe the creators for it! XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingstonlanguage

Flo Rida - Whistle ool

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

What do you mean? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingstonlanguage

Just the name fits in it lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karenawa

Thay's intersting, really.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

Yes, it is. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karenawa

:)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhiteLupus

They are amazing. Thou I couldn't find any lessons to learn it online (

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQmF7kbOrmE

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hollomagollo
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2 weeks ago
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