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  5. "Pomidory są smaczne."

"Pomidory smaczne."

Translation:Tomatoes are tasty.

December 29, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikanokoi

Wow, hello, Indo-European relicts! są = sunt in Latin, sind in German, суть in something before Russian (Old Church Slavonic?) I'm so profane in these things, but I love seeing this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idanlipin

Polish has a large influence from Italian and Latin generally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ten_Pies_I_Brew

In addition to that, Polish, Latin and German were once a single language, and the words są, sunt and sind come straight from that language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/winandfx

Why 'before Russian'? We use the word суть sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikanokoi

Но слишком редко, чтобы считать его частью парадигмы слова "быть"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabinsoniczek

I can't figure out when to use the ending -i, -y, or -e for adjectives that go with nouns in masculine/plural. Is there a rule that would help me remember?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertMact1

Re Polish plural adjectives: "In plural, the form is the same as neuter singular, unless referring specifically to men or people in general." eg singular adj. {smaczny, smaczna. smaczne} > plural adj. {smaczne}. See LearnPolish24.com "Adjectives" -https://learnpolish24.com/home/artykul/1646/adjectives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertMact1

...but Polish plural personal masculine endings take -i, or with a root change, -y, eg singular (personal) adjective {czarny, czarna, carne} > plural personal masculine adjective "czarni" & {biały, biała, białe} > "białi". BUT, with a root change, singular (personal) adjective {wysoky, wysoka, wysoke} > "wysocy" & {drogy, droga, drogie > "drodzy". See LearnPolish24.com "Adjectives" -https://learnpolish24.com/home/artykul/1646/adjectives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xantarawho

I can't believe they're teaching us how to lie so early


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrCantus

Do people in Poland eat as many tomatoes as these lessons suggest? It seems to be a constant diet of cookies, apples, tomatoes, ducks, fish and sandwiches - and presumably many of those in sandwiches.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Holzhaendler

It's rather an instrument for teaching grammer lessons based on different types of nouns and food. Would you prefer to learn the whole dictionary in one lesson? ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gruamaire

what's the difference between sa and to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"to" may be used in an "X is Y" sentence, when both X and Y are noun phrases and use Nominative.

"są" means "(they) are" - it's the 3rd person plural of 'to be'. If in an X is Y sentence Y was a noun phrase, it would need to be in Instrumental. But as here it's just an adjective, it stays in Nominative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronaldo8000

It would be very helpful for beginners, such as myself, if the answers would include the case, for example: "Pomidory są smaczne." (Nominative) Tomatoes are tasty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoellfurk

Why is "the tomatoes are tasty." wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It's a correct answer, it should have worked.

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