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What's the most effective way to memorize verb conjugations?

From Spanish, I used a chart to rote memorize the verb conjugations and I was wondering if there is a better method. Also, are the romance languages the only ones that use verb conjugations?

2 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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I don't know about verb conjugations, but I found a great method for memorizing which words are masculine and which are feminine. Picture a house in your mind, a rather memorable house. Then select two important rooms out of the house. As for myself, I chose the sun room and the basement. One of those rooms will represent all things feminine, and the other room encompasses all things masculine.

Now, every time you are learning a new masculine/feminine word, put that word, with its masculine/feminine article, into the respective masculine/feminine room. For instance, I put 'la lampara' in the sun room because it is feminine, and 'el bolso' in the basement because it is masculine. If you can, try to visualize the thing itself as you are putting it into the room. This is harder to do with words that do not reference physical things, but rather abstract ideas like 'wisdom'. In such cases, imagine aspects of what the word represents, like a man with kind eyes and a beard who is deep in thought.

I'm currently trying to figure out a similar strategy for the verb conjugations, because this visualization method is so amazingly powerful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ii5wh0ii5

Look, Cover, Write, Check might help. Personally I like to remember the patterns in regular verb endings and irregular verb endings. And then keep a list of those in a notepad, etc.

Italian is known for the language of romance. So it could be true. But every language is beautiful. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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1) It really takes practice rather than passive memorizing. You have to make up some fake verbs or just use some regular words to practice it in your mind until you get to conjugate them fluently/automatically without thinking on it much. You can also use online conjugation excercises to practice it. https://conjuguemos.com/list.php

2) Try to make associations and shortcuts between these rules. For example in Spanish the future tense endings (é, ás, á, emos, éis, án) are the same as the irregular present endings of the verb haber (he, has, ha, hemos, habéis, han).

3) Try to rationalize the endings and divide them into logical parts. This is a very advanced level it can be confusing for some people but I think it can also help you understand it better.

Habla - habl (root) + a(3rd singular for present)
Hablaba - habl (root) + ab (imperfect ending) + a (1st and 3rd singular ending for imperfect)
Hablabamos - habl(root) + ab (imperfect ending) + amos (1st plural ending for imperfect)

4) Understand the logic of the accents and stress in Spanish words so that it makes sense to you where to put accents in the endings and when to change the root of the verb (sentir-> siente but sentir -> sentiré because it changes only when it's the stressed syllable)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loopulk

English conjugates verbs.

I am. You are. He is. We are. You are. They are.

Not all languages conjugate verbs, however.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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For example, Chinese doesn't.

And Japanese or Danish conjugates for tense and mood, but not for person or number. So they have "I is, you is, he is, we is, you is, they is" for the present but then "I was, you was, he was etc." for the past with a different form than for the present but which is still the same for all persons and number.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
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I have found the conjugations to be quite easy as most of them fall into regular patterns. There are exceptions, but those one can pick up with longer practice. This post explains it well.
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6162231

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mereade
Mereade
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the tables are a good thing but I'd recommend combining them with a few more things and to try what will work for you in particular, as we are all a bit different. 1.Looking up the rules both for conjugating and using the proper tenses in a reliable source. Not for memorisation necessarily, but for understanding the system. 2.SRSing the tables. For example, there are awesome Spanish courses by Edthird on memrise 3.Exercises in more context, often found in grammar workbooks. 4.Substitution drills, such as those in the FSI but you can easily practice on your own. 5.Tons and tons of input will make the conjugations much easier to remember and actively use, fast and correctly. That's actually one of the most important points for me :-)

They are not the only ones. The germanic languages still keep the conjugations, especially German. The slavic languages conjugate as well. As far as I know, the Ugro-finnic languages and Greek all conjugate. Leaving Europe, I think the semmitic languages conjugate as well but I don't have the direct experience. So, it is no weird phenomenon. And you might be grateful the modern romance languages do not declinate, unlike their Latin ancestor and most of the list mentioned above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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Indoeuropean languages have conjugations, even English. Agglutinative languages add suffixes and their conjugations are (more) predictable, well. not Basque.

Spanish conjugations of regular verbs are very simple. In present tense: -o, -as/es/es, -a/e/e, -amos/emos/emos, -ais/eis/is, -an/en/en. In irregular verbs there are patterns too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uroshu
uroshu
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I've found the following site extremely useful since it's the only one that offers pronunciation of over 35000 English, French, German, Italian and Spanish verb conjugation tables. Just type in the verb you would like to see conjugated and hear how each and every form of the verb of your choice is pronounced: http://conjugation.io/

2 months ago