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  5. "Мой кот хотел молока."

"Мой кот хотел молока."

Translation:My tomcat wanted some milk.

December 30, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Consciousness90

Explain the origin of the word "tomcat", please. I well know word "cat", but at first time see word "tomcat". What is it exactly mean? What is the different?

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

"Tomcat" is what this course uses to signify that the cat is male.

In reality it's very uncommon to refer to a male cat as a tomcat, you would usually just call it a cat.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

It is not very common in this course either ;) We translate it as a "tom" a few times just for fun, but mostly use "cat" and allow both кот and кошка when translating back to Russian.

The only problem here is that the word itself is very common, so pretending кот did not exist was not a good option. We still do not have дача and колбаса, which are nigh on untranslatable without really long footnotes.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elsantodel90

I googled "Дача" and indeed it does not seem so easy to translate (I would venture "country house" as a first approximation), but Wikipedia, Wiktionary and Google Translate all seem to imply that "колбаса" is simply "sausage", without any caveat. Is there some hidden trick here?

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Any of these is колбаса (except in the upper left corner and near the far wall).

None of these is колбаса. You only see сосики (thin) and сардельки (thick) on the photo.

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeydoritos

Is молока being in the genitive kind of like a partitive construction in French?

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Yes, exactly. It is the partitive use of Genitive, expressing an indeterminate amount of something (or an amount only determined by how much was actually used, consumed, bought etc.).

Genitive is a very popular case which comes in handy in many places and with many prepositions.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenny14684

Would it be plain wrong to use the accusative or would it be correct but change the meaning slightly and/or sound odd? In French you could say Le chat veut du lait = the cat wants some milk = partitive but you could also say Le chat veut le lait = the cats wants the milk -> it sounds a bit strange but it could be said , it just changes the focus from the amount to the product itself

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Both can be used. The difference is that shade of meaning between "wanted the milk, not something else" and "wanted to have some milk".

May 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loupy17

Why is milk genetive? I understand that genetive is to be used when speaking of amounts but wanting milk is not really an amount, or am I mistaken ?

August 7, 2018
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