"Der Vorname ist nicht schlecht."

Translation:The first name is not bad.

January 12, 2013

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/unknownhours

Does this mean it's good or that it's not horrible?

June 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/twiztedfate

as a native English speaker If someone says "Not bad" they mean it's not good or great, but not bad or horrible. It's interchangeable with "it's okay" or "it's alright"

October 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
Plus
  • 20
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

But it the UK it means "that may be the best thing ever", especially when said with raised eyebrows, whereas "brilliant!" often simply means an acknowledgement.

"I brought extra power cords for the laptops." "Brilliant."

Caveat: not a native English English speaker. I really feel like I could benefit from a full course in "UK English for USA English Speakers". :)

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

Perhaps we should petition Duolingo for one? I periodically feel the need for the converse: American English for speakers of English English. :P
(Note: Scottish English is different again...)

June 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BampaOwl
  • 21
  • 19
  • 15
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 202

But not any more different than some other regional forms of English, such as Yorkshire or West Country. unless you are talking about the Scots language, which is another thing altogether!

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

I would agree. Mainy regional dialects, when not being consciously moderated by their speakers for the benefit of outsiders, display strong variation from 'Standard English'.
I would say that Scottish English (which is strongly influenced by loanwords from Scots) differs only in the extent to which it is used in mainstream media; it is therefore more likely to be encountered than other regional forms.

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TyNoOutlet
  • 9
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Yes, I was thinking that there should be a Uk English for US English speakers in bed last night.

March 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/.b.e.e.

we should get Australian English too then to teach all the words we've added

May 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NickMarsto1
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 2

Fair dos cobber.

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilCockling
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 107

Were you thinking in bed last night, or just thinking about the needs of US English speakers who were in bed last night?

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/usallyb
  • 17
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 4

Misplaced modifiers are a great source of amusement!

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vanw39
  • 25
  • 19
  • 14
  • 9

Wir müssen nie vergessen, dass wir zwei Länder sind durch eine gemeinsame Sprache geteilt.

September 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 8
  • 14

If I remember correctly, Winston Churchill is supposed to have said that.

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NyamNyamNy1
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 17
  • 18

I'm afraid not. It seems that it stems from Oscar Wilde (a fairly safe bet for any unknown quotation), having said "...we have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language." The form in which it is given here is usually attributed to Bernard Shaw.

For further information, this was my source: https://quoteinvestigator.com/2016/04/03/common/ And this was my source: Brown.

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK158665
  • 25
  • 16
  • 8
  • 2
  • 445

This is one in a range of meanings which one has to determine from context. Along with "so-so," it can also be taken literally ("the food has not spoiled"), or it can be an understated way of saying "excellent," as another poster said.

November 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sprogg96

Using 'not bad' in English for 'good' is more of a colloquialism, so it wouldn't translate into German exactly like this. I think it's safe to assume that in this sentence it literally means 'not bad'

November 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/martofunes

Actually in Germany you hear it a lot, Nicht Schlecht as an idiom to mean good. I know what you mean, and with other languages it may be so, but it just so happens that it exists and its really spread in usage.

November 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Grayson76

I was wondering the same thing :)

July 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenni7771
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 3

"The first name is not wrong" is incorrect?

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/maranathaman

"schlecht" means bad (as opposed to good), not wrong (as opposed to correct). It's quite a subtle difference, yes, but saying "the first name is not wrong" implies that there is a correct answer of some sort, while "the first name is not bad" simply means the name is okay in a general way. I hope that makes sense and helps.

December 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/flow.flow

Why isn't it "Der Vorname ist schlecht nicht"? (trying to wrap my head around negatives still)

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mrrolandz2

because nicht precedes the adjectives (esp. "schlecht" in this sentence.)

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LydiaTan1

What's the difference between Name and Vorname?

September 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lariwestside
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 12
  • 4

"Name" is what is often used as a replacement for "Nachname" (last name) in German. Last names are generally more important in German than in English; employee nametags usually say Frau/Herr [Nachname] instead of using first names.

October 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FramedInBlue

Vorname is the fore-name or first-name and Name (a title, a name, etc) means the same in German as in English.

October 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Erikman
  • 22
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Just to see if it would be accepted, I tried 'the first name ain't bad.' It was marked wrong. Does Duo recognize "ain't" as a real word? I know that it technically isn't a word (even though it does appear in most of the dictionaries that I've seen), but it is so commonly used that it would make sense that it would be accepted.

November 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/GymFLD
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11

I think my mother just rolled over in her grave. :) She used to scold us if we said "ain't". She might be horrified if she learned that it is actually in the dictionary now.

September 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
Plus
  • 20
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

I am one.

I 'm one too.

I am not one.

I'm not one. And you are not one.

Oh, aren't I?

Whoa. How did we go from "am" to "are" here? Where's "amn't"? Stuff like this just flows for a native speaker, but when you really look at it ... we should all be constantly horrified, or maybe just amused.

October 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NyamNyamNy1
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 17
  • 18

Language is as language is used. Thus, any word must be entered into the dictionary if used with sufficient frequency, even if it has "colloquial" attached to it.

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/usallyb
  • 17
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 4

Somewhere I read that ‘ain’t’ actually comes from Old English. Who knew!

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeCisner

Is there a difference between der Nachname, der Zuname, und der Familienname? Are they used interchangeably?

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ndrwbrrw
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 9
  • 2
  • 448

This is an example of litotes

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CCusick

Why is 'Vorname' capitalized?

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kevin.hadley

Because Vorname is a noun, meaning "(first) name". (All nouns are capitalized in German.)

January 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Strobro3
  • 19
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Is a surname and a first name the same thing? I put surname and got it wrong

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
Plus
  • 20
  • 16
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

Forename is the more formal term for first name. The last name, the family name, is the surname.

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Strobro3
  • 19
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Oh, okay, thanks.

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/noaboboe

this sentence would only be bad if the first name was stupid

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DawsonDarl

"Stupid"?? That would be a horrible first name! Who would do that to their child??

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveCarew

Is Vorname the same as first name?

November 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emmanuel465503
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 5

Yes, it closely resembles the word "Forename" if you think about it

November 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ericdec85

WTF?

January 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DawsonDarl

Well thank goodness! "Schlecht" woukd be a horrible first name.

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebNissen

What's this even supposed to mean?

November 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/igeeko
  • 14
  • 13
  • 8

the first name isn't bad; it is supposed to teach us how to use nicht and schlect and vorname

November 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NickMarsto1
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 6
  • 2

No issue with the construction " nicht schlecht", but who would presume to say that of a person's first name?

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/joyce342675

that's what I typed, but I was marked wrong. Schlecht was translated as half bad

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertoHer876128

This doesn't make sense

December 5, 2017
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.